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Full text of "Cornell University- New York Hospital School of Nursing Announcement"

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Digitized by the Internet Archive 
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http://archive.org/details/cornelluniversit19711976corn 



Cornell University 
Announcements 

Cornell University-New 

School of Nursing 

1971-72 



Cornell University 



Cornell University-New York Hospital 

School of Nursing 

1320 York Avenue 

New York, New York 10021 

1971-72 



Cornell University Announcements 



Volume 63 of the Cornell University 
Announcements consists of twenty-three catalogs, 
of which this is number 10, dated August 6, 1971. 
Publication dates: twenty-three times a year 
(four times in August and October; three times in 
March and November; twice in July and 
September; once in January, April, May, June, and 
December). Publisher: Cornell University, 
Sheldon Court, 420 College Avenue, Ithaca, 
New York 14850. Second-class postage 
paid at Ithaca, New York. 



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Contents 



Academic Calendar 5 

Cornell University-New York Hospital 

School of Nursing 7 

History of the School 7 

Accreditation 8 

The Professional Program 8 

Admission 9 

Academic Standing and Grades 10 

State Registration for Graduates 11 

Expenses 11 

Financial Assistance 12 

General Information 13 

Facilities for Instruction 14 

Description of Courses 17 

Register 19 

Further Information and Application 27 

Index 25 

List of Announcements 28 



The courses and curricula described in this 
Announcement, and the teaching personnel 
listed herein, are subject to change at any time 
by official action of Cornell University. 




Mr**] 



Academic Calendar 



1971-72 



Orientation, entering class, begins 9:00 a.m. 

Orientation, entering class, ends 4:00 p.m. 

Labor Day holiday 

Registration and Advisement, all classes, 
9:00 a.m.-12:00 noon 

Fall term instruction begins, all classes, 1:30 p.m. 

Opening convocation 

School holiday 

Midsemester grades due, 5:00 p.m. 

Instruction suspended, 1:00 p.m. 

Thanksgiving recess 

Instruction resumed, 7:30 a.m. 

Fall term instruction ends, 5:00 p.m. 

Christmas recess 

Course completion period begins, 8:00 a.m. 

Course completion period ends, 5:00 p.m. 

Final examinations and clinical evaluation begin, 
9:00 a.m. 

Final examinations and clinical evaluation end, 
5:00 p.m. 

Midyear recess 

Registration, all classes, ends 9:00 a.m. 

Spring term instruction, all classes, begins 
9:00 a.m. 

Midsemester grades due, 5:00 p.m. 

Spring recess 

Instruction resumed, 7:30 a.m. 

Spring term instruction ends, 5:00 p.m. 

Course completion period begins, 8:00 a.m. 

Course completion ends, 5:00 p.m. 

Final examinations and clinical evaluation begin 

Final examinations and clinical evaluation end, 
12:00 noon 

Final grades in, class of 1972, 5:00 p.m. 

Memorial Day holiday 

Convocation and commencement 

The dates shown in the Academic Calendar are subject 
official action of Cornell University. 



Thursday, September 2 
Friday, September 3 
Monday, September 6 

Tuesday, September 7 
Tuesday, September 7 

Monday, October 25 
Friday, October 29 
Wednesday, November 24 

Monday, November 29 
Wednesday, December 22 

Thursday, January 6 
Tuesday, January 11 

Wednesday, January 12 

Friday, January 14 

Monday, January 24 

Monday, January 24 
Friday, March 17 
Saturday, March 18 
Monday, March 27 
Friday, May 12 
Monday, May 15 
Friday, May 19 
Monday, May 22 

Friday, May 26 
Friday, May 26 
Monday, May 29 
Wednesday, May 31 

to change at any time by 



Cornell University- New York Hospital 
School of Nursing 



History of the School 

The Cornell University-New York Hospital School 
of Nursing was established as a school in Cornell 
University in 1942, on the sixty-fifth anniversary 
of the founding of The New York Hospital School 
of Nursing, one of the earliest nursing schools in 
the country. The School is part of the New York 
Hospital-Cornell Medical Center, which includes 
also the Cornell University Medical College and 
the various buildings of The New York Hospital 
extending from Sixty-eighth to Seventy-first 
Streets on the East River. 

The Center is a joint undertaking of The Society 
of the New York Hospital and Cornell University, 
committed to a fourfold purpose in the (1) care 
of the sick, providing the same wisdom and skill 
to rich and poor; (2) education of doctors and 
nurses, research workers, technicians, and others 
who will work in the field of medical science; (3) 
research to extend the boundaries of knowledge 
in the health fields; and the (4) promotion of 
public health through the development of pre- 
ventive medicine. 

The New York Hospital is the second-oldest 
voluntary hospital in this country, its Royal Charter 
having been granted in 1771, in the reign of 
King George III. The first patients were soldiers 
wounded in the Revolutionary War. At that time 
the Hospital was located on the lower end of 
Manhattan, the only part of the city then settled, 
and on early maps the location was designated 
simply as "the Hospital." 

Cornell University, with its campus in Ithaca, 
New York, received its charter in 1865. Three 
circumstances contributed to the founding of the 
University in the eventful years that marked the 
close of the Civil War. In the first place, Ezra 
Cornell, a citizen of Ithaca, had come into a large 
fortune from his holdings in the newly formed 
Western Union Telegraph Company and had de- 
voted much thought to the good that might be 
done by giving his wealth to education. A second 
circumstance was the fact that the state of New 
York had received a substantial land grant, under 
the Morrill Act of 1862, for the support of colleges 



teaching agriculture and the mechanical arts. The 
third circumstance was that Mr. Cornell had as a 
colleague in the state legislature of 1864-65, a 
young senator named Andrew D. White, later to 
become the first president of the University, who 
had the vision of preserving the state's land grant 
intact for a single great institution which should 
teach not only agriculture and the mechanical arts 
but the humanities and the sciences as well. The 
Medical College, the School of Nursing, and the 
Graduate School of Medical Sciences are the 
divisions of the University which are located in 
New York City. 

The Hospital had been operating for over one 
hundred years before a school for the training of 
nurses was opened. Early steps had been taken, 
however, to improve the care given to patients; 
in 1799 Dr. Valentine Seaman, a scholar and 
prominent physician, had organized a series of 
lectures, combined with a course of practical in- 
struction in the wards, for the women whom 
the Hospital had engaged as "watchers" and 
"nurses." Although the theoretical content was 
meager and the practical instruction not systemat- 
ically planned, these classes focused attention on 
the fact that women who had some preparation 
for their work gave better care than those without 
instruction. When, in 1873, the first training school 
in this country on the Nightingale pattern was 
opened in Bellevue Hospital, the Governors of The 
Society of the New York Hospital contributed to 
its support. Four years later, in 1877, when the 
Hospital moved to new buildings, The New York 
Hospital Training School for Nurses was opened 
in quarters which were considered to have all the 
modern improvements of the times. The School 
moved to the present location when the Medical 
Center was opened in 1932. 

The health needs of the community and country 
have been the guiding force in the development 
of the School, which has modified its program to 
keep pace with these needs. Today, the work of 
the professional nurse requires much more self- 
direction and leadership ability than in the past, 
and, in recognition of this, the University program 
was established in 1942. Since 1946, all students 



8 Accreditation 



admitted to the School have been candidates for 
the degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing. 

The Cornell University-New York Hospital 
School of Nursing Alumnae Association, originally 
the Alumnae Association of The New York Hos- 
pital School of Nursing, was organized in 1893. It 
was one of the ten alumnae associations which 
helped to bring about the national professional 
organization of nurses, now known as the Amer- 
ican Nurses' Association. In 1945 the Alumnae 
Association became a part of the Cornell Univer- 
sity Alumni Association. 



Accreditation 

The School is accredited by the Department of 
Baccalaureate and Higher Degree Programs of the 
National League for Nursing as a generic college 
program leading to a baccalaureate degree. 

The School is registered by the State Education 
Department, Division of Professional Education 
of the University of the State of New York. 



As a professional person he recognizes the 
need to continue to develop his personal and pro- 
fessional competence through the formal and in- 
formal educational structures which are best 
suited to his needs and abilities. 



Objectives 

Upon completion of the program the graduate 
will- 
function as a beginning-level professional nurse 
practitioner in a variety of settings; 

use the intellectual skills of observation, assess- 
ment, planning, and evaluation to establish and 
implement nursing goals; 

understand how man functions in relationship 
to himself and others in health and sickness; 

apply principles of leadership in directing nurs- 
ing care of patients; 

function as a colleague with members of an 
interdisciplinary team; 

possess a foundation for continuing profession- 
al development in nursing. 



The Professional Program 

The School accepts its responsibility for the 
preparation of a professional nurse by offering a 
curriculum based on the following philosophy and 
objectives. 



Philosophy 

Education is a process which helps the individual 
to develop his potential so that he may function 
productively within existing and changing social 
systems. This is a dynamic process involving the 
active participation of the learner and the teacher. 
The school provides the environment in which the 
learner can test his abilities and evaluate his 
progress. 

The liberal arts courses provide the foundation 
for the professional courses of the nursing major. 
The integration of these areas enables the student 
to understand himself, his social and physical 
environment, and the role of the professional 
nurse in society. 

The professional nurse recognizes the right of 
the individual to attain and maintain his optimum 
state of health. He actively participates with in- 
dividuals and families to establish and evaluate 
health goals and intervenes to alter these goals 
with appropriate action when necessary. 

The professional nurse assumes responsibility 
for maintaining optimum standards for the plan- 
ning and the delivery of nursing care. He is able 
to do this in a variety of settings not only as an 
individual but as a member of the interdisciplinary 
health team. 

He recognizes the need to speak on both com- 
munity and professional issues which are within 
his field of competence and assists in promoting 
the public interest in health by defining and 
clarifying health issues. 



The Nursing Major 

The nursing major, consisting of four semesters 
of full-time study, is offered in two programs 
identified as Program I and Program II. Both pro- 
grams are based upon the philosophy that liberal 
arts courses provide the foundation for the pro- 
fessional courses of the nursing major. In keeping 
with this philosophy, course requirements in the 
humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences 
have been identified as prerequisites for both 
programs. Sixty liberal arts credits are required 
for admission to Program I. In addition to pre- 
senting the required prerequisites for the nursing 
major, students who enroll in Program II are 
required to hold a baccalaureate degree in an- 
other discipline before admission to the pro- 
fessional program. Both programs lead to the 
degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing. 

Each student entering the school is expected 
to complete the entire program for which he is 
enrolled. To meet the objectives of the program, 
students will have clinical experiences in a variety 
of hospital and community settings. In order to 
be eligible for the degree from Cornell, the last 
year must be spent in full-time study in one of 
these programs. The faculty reserves the right to 
make changes in the curriculum which it believes 
are in keeping with the changing needs of society 
or the best interests of the student and the school. 

The programs are planned so the student 
moves from less-complex situations in the care 
of individuals and families, to those situations 
which test his ability to provide leadership in the 
delivery of health services. 

Initially attention is focused on the acquisition 
of nursing skills and the role of the professional 
nurse in the care of adult patients. 

In the courses of the second and third semes- 
ter, the student studies the patient in the hospital, 
the home, and the community. The content of one 
semester deals with the family in which the preg- 



The Nursing Major 9 



nant woman and the child provide the focus for 
the learning experiences. The content and experi- 
ences offered in the alternate semester provide 
the student with the opportunity to explore the 
needs of patients and families who are facing 
problems of short- and long-term physical and 
emotional illnesses. Study of the effect of the 
environment upon health and disease is cor- 
related with the content of this semester. 

In the final semester the student has the op- 
portunity to test his leadership ability in the 
delivery of patient care. 

Courses in the biological and social sciences 
are offered concurrently with the nursing courses. 

Plan of Program I 

Detailed descriptions of the courses listed below 
are found on pp. 17-18. 



Third Year 

Fall Semester 
Nursing 153 
Nursing 160 
Biological Science 130 



Spring Semester* 
Nursing 154 
Social Science 107 
Biological Science 131 



Fourth Year 

Fall Semesterf 
Nursing 155 
Public Health 246 
Biological Science 132 



Hours 

10 

2 

4 

16 

10 
2 
3 

15 



Spring Semester 
Nursing 250 
Social Science 108 
Social Science 207 



11 
2 
3 

16 

12 
3 
2 

17 

* Two-thirds of the class will elect these courses for 
the fall semester of the fourth year. 
t Two-thirds of the class will elect these courses for 
the spring semester of the third year. 

Plan of Program II 

For detailed descriptions of the following courses, 
see pp. 17-18. 



First Year 

Fall Semester 
Nursing 156 
Nursing 160 
Biological Science 133 



Hours 

10 

2 

3 

15 



Spring Semester 
Nursing 157 
Social Science 107 
Biological Science 134 



Second Year 

Fall Semester 
Nursing 256 
Biological Science 135 



Spring Semester 
Nursing 257 
Social Science 108 
Social Science 207 



10 
2 
3 

15 



10 
2 

12 

10 
3 
2 

15 



Admission 

General Requirements 

The number of applicants with minimum qualifica- 
tions exceeds the number of students that can be 
admitted to the two programs of the nursing major 
each year. Selected each year are those appli- 
cants who, in competition with others seeking 
admission at the same time, have demonstrated 
by their qualifications that they are well fitted for 
the nursing profession. 

Evaluation of the candidate's ability to profit 
from the instruction at the School of Nursing is 
based on his secondary-school and college rec- 
ords, the recommendations of school authorities, 
and the results of standardized achievement tests. 
Evidence of the candidate's ability to make effec- 
tive use of free time, as well as his capacity for 
leadership and concern for others, is given due 
consideration. These are evaluated on the basis 
of extra curricular activities, references, and an 
interview. An extensive medical report is required 
because of the nature of the professional program. 

A student already enrolled in the nursing major 
of another college or university may request the 
evaluation of his college record for possible trans- 
fer to this School. 

It is the policy of Cornell University actively to 
support the American ideal of equality of op- 
portunity for all and no student shall be denied 
admission or otherwise discriminated against be- 
cause of race, color, creed, religion, or national 
origin. 



Specific Requirements for Program I 

Students who have completed a minimum of sixty 
semester hours in any university, college, or junior 
college accredited by one of the regional associa- 
tions of colleges and secondary schools may 
apply for transfer to the nursing major of Program 
I. 



10 Admission 



The following distribution of courses is to be 
used as a guideline in planning a program for the 
first two years of college. Records will be re- 
viewed on an individual basis and adjustments 
made. 

Communications, 6 credits: composition, public 
speaking, or speech 

Humanities, 20-30 credits: art, language, litera- 
ture, music, philosophy, religion 

Natural science and mathematics, 12 credits: 
mathematics, biology, chemistry, physics (Col- 
lege-level biology and chemistry are considered 
essential prerequisites. Based on individual evalu- 
ation an advanced high school course in either 
biology or chemistry may be accepted, in which 
case other college science and mathematics will 
be accepted.) 

Social science and history, 12-22 credits: soci- 
ology (3 credits required), psychology (3 credits 
required), political science, anthropology, eco- 
nomics 

Specific Requirements for Program II 

Persons who hold or are to be awarded a bac- 
calaureate degree by an accredited senior college 
or university may be considered for admission to 
this program of the nursing major. Applicants to 
this program will be required to take selected 
proficiency examinations. 

The following distribution of courses is required 
for admission to this program. 

Humanities, 10 credits 

Social Science, 10 credits 

Natural Science, 8 credits (Although records are 
reviewed on an individual basis college-level 
biology and chemistry are considered essential 
prerequisites.) 

Applications 

Prospective students should write the Office of the 
Registrar, Cornell University-New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1320 York Avenue, New York, 
New York 10021, for forms to be used in making 
application for admission. 

Important Dates 

The following information and dates apply to ap- 
plicants to both programs of the nursing major. 

Requests for applications may be made any 
time after April 1, 1971, for admission in Septem- 
ber 1972. 

Admissions applications are due by October 1 
for early review and by February 15 for regular 
review. Applications will be accepted after Feb- 
ruary 15 only if places remain in the class to be 
filled. 

Early review decisions are announced January 
1. Decisions made by regular review are an- 
nounced in March and April. Applications sub- 



mitted after February 15 will be acted upon as 
they are completed. 

Financial-aid applications for all applicants are 
due by February 1. Decisions are announced May 
1. 

Each applicant accepted by regular review must 
advise the School of his decision regarding ad- 
mission and financial aid by May 15. Early review 
applicants will be advised of this date upon ac- 
ceptance. 

Visits to the School 

Members of the staff are available to meet with 
prospective applicants to discuss the School's 
admission requirements, application procedures, 
and the appropriateness of the applicant's liberal 
arts education in satisfying the requirements for 
admission. Although appointments for these visits 
are not required, prospective applicants are urged 
to call the Registrar's Office before visiting the 
School. 

An informational visit does not take the place 
of the required interview which is scheduled after 
application materials have been submitted. 



Academic Standing and Grades 

The Academic Standards Committee, composed 
of faculty representing the two nursing programs 
and the Dean or her representative, meets at least 
two times each year to review the academic 
records of students in the School. The Committee 
is responsible for reviewing the records of stu- 
dents whose suitability for nursing is in question 
and of students whose cumulative average does 
not meet minimal standards for promotion or 
whose cumulative average has dropped seriously 
since the previous semester. 

The Committee recommends to the faculty the 
promotion of all students, and the candidates for 
the degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing. The 
Committee acts on the records of those students 
who qualify for the Dean's List (semester average 
of 3.25) and who are to be considered for gradu- 
ation with distinction. 

A student who receives a grade of D or F in a 
course at midsemester will be notified by the 
Registrar in order to give him the opportunity to 
seek guidance in his work during the remainder 
of the semester. The student may be seen by 
ether his adviser or the dean to establish a plan 
to complete the remaining academic work of the 
particular semester. 

A student who receives a semester grade of F 
or an Incomplete (I) in a required course will be 
considered on an individual basis regarding his 
continuation in the School. A student who receives 
an Incomplete in a course is required to complete 
the course within one year unless it is prerequisite 
to another course. In this instance it must be 
completed before registering for the subsequent 
course. A student who receives a D in nursing 
theory or practice at the end of the semester will 
be reviewed on an individual basis. 



Academic Standing and Grades 11 



The faculty of the School of Nursing reserves 
the privilege of retaining only those students who, 
in their judgment, satisfy the requirements of 
scholarship, health, and personal suitability for 
professional nursing. A student who does not at- 
tain the required cumulative average of a semes- 
ter may remain in the school on academic warning 
for one semester. If at the end of the semester 
his cumulative average has not reached the level 
required for the semester in which he is regis- 
tered, he will be required to withdraw from the 
School. A student may be asked to withdraw 
without previously having been on academic 
warning. 

Parents and guardians do not receive regular 
notice of the student's grades. They are advised 
when a student is placed on academic warning 
or is asked to withdraw from the School. 

A student is eligible for honorable withdrawal 
at any time he may elect to leave if his academic 
and personal record meet the standards of the 
School and if his financial record has been 
cleared in the Office of the Dean. 

Minimal Cumulative Averages Required 



Semester 


Program 1 


Program II 


1st 


1.6 


1.6 


2nd 


1.76 


1.78 


3rd 


1.82 


1.84 


4th 


1.83 


1.88 



The established pattern for grading is based on 
the following 4.0 scale: A (3.5-4.0); B (2.5-3.4); 
C (1.5-2.4); D (0.5-1.4); and F (0.0-0.4). 

Sigma Theta Tau 

In 1968 the School received a charter for the 
Alpha Upsilon chapter of Sigma Theta Tau, the 
National Honor Society of Nursing. The purposes 
of the Society are to recognize the achievement 
of scholarship of superior quality, to promote the 
development of leadership qualities, and to en- 
courage creative work while fostering high pro- 
fessional ideals. Finally, it is hoped that the com- 
mitment of the individual to the ideals and pur- 
poses of professional nursing will be strengthened 
by participation in the Honor Society. 

Students who have completed one-half of the 
nursing major with a cumulative average of 3.0 
or better are considered for induction. In addition 
to demonstrated superior scholastic achievement, 
a candidate must give evidence of professional 
leadership potential and possess desirable per- 
sonal qualifications. 

Degree Requirements 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing is 
granted by Cornell University. In order to qualify 
for the degree, the student must have attained 
the required minimum cumulative average for the 
total program and must have completed satis- 
factorily all of the theory and clinical laboratory 
courses outlined in this Announcement or required 
by decision of the faculty. 



In keeping with practice throughout the Uni- 
versity, students in the School of Nursing may be 
granted the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Nursing with distinction. To qualify for this honor 
the student must have attained a cumulative aver- 
age of 3.25 in the nursing major. An average of 
"B" in college courses taken prior to transferring 
to the School of Nursing is required to qualify for 
this honor. 



State Registration for Graduates 

Graduates of the School are urged to take the 
state board examination for licensure which is 
administered by the Regents of the state of New 
York. Each graduate is expected to take the first 
examination for licensure which is administered 
after he has completed the Nursing program. 
Graduates who plan to work outside of New York 
State should determine whether that state has a 
mandatory licensure law. If so, the graduate is 
urged to establish a date of employment based 
upon his expected date of licensure. Satisfactory 
completion of this examination licenses the gradu- 
ate of the School as a Registered Nurse (R.N.). 
The application for the examination is released 
by the Office of the Registrar during the final 
semester in which the student is registered in 
the School. 



Expenses 

The costs of attending the School of Nursing fall 
into two general categories. The first category 
includes certain fixed charges for tuition, fees, 
deposits, and related charges for services pro- 
vided by the School. The second category in- 
cludes living costs and items of personal expense. 
To help students estimate individual expenses the 
following table should be consulted. 



Estimated Total Expenses 

Although expenses, excluding tuition, fees, and 
room, vary for the individual students, the budget 
is estimated for those who plan to be resident 
students. Applicants and students who intend to 
become nonresident students should write to the 
Chairman, Financial Assistance Committee, for the 
commuting student's adjusted budget. 
The following figures are for the academic year. 

Item Estimate 

Tuition and Fees $1,750 

Room 500 

Meals 900 

Books, supplies 200 

Clothing, laundry, cleaning 300 

Incidentals, recreation 300 
Transportation* 

Uniform supplies (entering students) 200 

* Transportation for clinical experience: third-year stu- 
dents should add $30 to their budget; fourth-year 
students $100. 



12 Expenses 



Fees 

Application Fee. (For applicants registered in a 
general education program.) A fee of $15 must 
accompany the application for first admission. 

Transfer Fee. (For applicants registered in a 
baccalaureate nursing program). A fee of $25 is 
charged to evaluate the record of a student al- 
ready registered in a baccalaureate nursing pro- 
gram who wishes to apply for transfer to this 
School. 

Reinstatement Fee. (For students previously reg- 
istered in this school). A fee of $10 will be 
charged to evaluate the record of a former student 
seeking to reregister in this School. 

Acceptance Fee. A nonrefundable fee of $50 
must be paid by each person at the time he is 
notified of this tentative acceptance in the school. 

Late registration fee. A fee of $5 is charged to 
each late registrant. First-semester registration 
closes 12 Noon, September 7, 1971. Second- 
semester registration closes 9 a.m., January 24, 
1972. 



Payment of Bills 

Bills for fixed charges are distributed approxi- 
mately two weeks prior to each semester. The bill 
is due and payable at registration each semester, 
unless special arrangements have been made with 
the School. The amount, time, and manner of 
payment of tuition, fees, or other charges may be 
changed at any time without notice. 

Provision is made for the payment of bills dur- 
ing the registration period at the beginning of 
each semester. Financial assistance awarded by 
the School, except loans, will be applied directly 
to the fixed charges. No reimbursement of assist- 
ance offered as a grant is anticipated unless 
the student voluntarily leaves the School during 
the course of a semester. In this case, one-half 
of the amount of the grant is to be reimbursed. 

A student completes arrangements for a loan 
authorized by the School by signing a note and 
receiving the check during the registration period. 
The proceeds of a loan must be applied first to 
the balance due on School charges but may not 
be claimed as an exemption from the bill. 

New York State scholarships and incentive 
awards may not be claimed as an exemption from 
the tuition and fee bill since the State prepares 
individual checks, which are payable to the stu- 
dent, and sends them to the School for distribu- 
tion. Checks for these awards will not be available 
at the time tuition and fees are due. When an 
extension of time for payment of part or all of the 
tuition and fees is granted, based on a New York 
State award, it is with the understanding that 
should the State for any reason fail to prepare a 
check for the amount of the award, the student is 
personally responsible for the amount due. 

In order for a student to remain in good stand- 



ing, receive an honorable withdrawal from the 
School, or participate in the commencement 
exercises, all bills must be paid and satisfactory 
arrangements made for the future repayment of 
loans. 

Students who have questions regarding their 
bills, or the payment of grants or loans after the 
registration period, should see the administrative 
assistant in NR-210. 

Refunds 

Part of the tuition and fees will be refunded to 
students who officially withdraw during the first 
half of the semester. The refund will be based 
on a deduction of 10 percent per week on all 
charges, as of the first day of the semester. No 
refund will be made after the midsemester. 



Financial Assistance 

In general, students plan to meet the cost of their 
education through self-help (loans and employ- 
ment). To the extent that is possible, parents are 
expected to contribute to the cost of a student's 
education. 

The Cornell University-New York Hospital 
School of Nursing participates in the College 
Scholarship Service (CSS) of the College En- 
trance Examination Board. Participants in CSS 
subscribe to the principle that the amount of 
financial assistance granted a student should be 
based upon financial need. The CSS assists col- 
leges and universities and other agencies in 
determining the student's need for financial as- 
sistance. Each entering student who seeks finan- 
cial assistance is required to submit a copy of the 
appropriate Confidential Statement form to the 
College Scholarship Service by March 1 designat- 
ing Cornell University-New York Hospital School 
of Nursing as one of the recipients. The Confi- 
dential Statement should be obtained from the 
School of Nursing. 

Financial assistance is offered to students 
usually as a combination of scholarship or grant, 
loan, and employment. The scholarships and 
grants administered by the School are described 
below. These are assigned on the basis of need 
rather than academic rating. 

Loans are available from a fund established 
jointly by the School and the federal government 
under the terms of Part B of Public Law 88-581, 
Nurse Training Act, of 1964. No more than $1,500 
may be borrowed by a student during an aca- 
demic year. The Health Manpower Act of 1968, 
enacted by the Ninetieth Congress, amended the 
original act to include scholarship grants as well 
as loans. To be eligible for either a grant or a 
loan, a student must intend to be enrolled full 
time and demonstrate the need for financial assist- 
ance. In addition, he must be a citizen or national 
of the United States, or have such immigration 
status and personal plans as to justify the con- 
clusion that he intends to become a permanent 
resident of the United States. 



Financial Assistance 13 



Application for Financial Assistance 

An entering student who will need financial assist- 
ance should return the Financial Assistance Ap- 
plication with her application form by February 1. 
This will be forwarded to the chairman of the 
Financial Assistance Committee. The Confidential 
Statement should be filed through the College 
Scholarship Service by March 1 of the year the 
applicant anticipates his admission to the School 
of Nursing. 

Students enrolled in the School who expect to 
register for the next academic year and who 
anticipate the need for any form of financial as- 
sistance, should make appointments to see the 
chairman of the Financial Assistance Committee 
before December 15. All students receiving finan- 
cial assistance will be seen by the chairman of 
the Committee during the fall semester to review 
their awards. Students who may or may not be 
receiving financial assistance and whose family 
situations change during an academic year, 
should feel free to discuss their problems with the 
chairman of the Committee. 



Financial Assistance Administered 
by the School 

Fund of the Committee for Scholarships. A fund, 
established and maintained by a committee of 
women interested in the School of Nursing, to 
assist young women who need financial help in 
order to prepare for nursing. Awards from the 
fund are made to entering students and to stu- 
dents enrolled in the School. 

Allstate Foundation Grant. A grant is made avail- 
able to the School each year to assist a student 
throughout the program. 

The Switzer Foundation Grant. A grant of $1,200 
is made available to the School each year. This 
grant is intended to assist a student who is an 
American citizen living within fifty miles of New 
York City and who has financial need. 

Davison/Foreman Foundation Grant. Grants from 
this Foundation are allocated in the spring se- 
mester for the education of women working for 
a college degree. The awards are made to stu- 
dents enrolled in the School. 

Woman's Florist Association, Inc., Scholarship. 

Under a scholarship plan established in 1949 by 
the Woman's Florist Association, Inc., a nursing 
student who has satisfactorily completed one year 
of his nursing major is eligible for a scholarship 
not to exceed the sum of $200. This scholarship 
is to be used for tuition by a student in financial 
need. Since 1959, two of these scholarships have 
been made available to the School of Nursing 
each year. 

Cornell Women's Club of New York. In the spring 
of the year a scholarship is made available by 
this Club for the ensuing school year. It is 



awarded either to an entering student or a student 
enrolled in the School. 

Vivian B. Allen Scholarship Fund. Established as 
an endowed fund by gifts from the Vivian B. Allen 
Foundation, Inc., income from which is used to 
provide scholarship aid annually for one or more 
students in need of financial assistance. 

Juliette E. Blohme Scholarship Fund. Estab- 
lished as an endowed fund by Dr. and Mrs. 
George H. Van Emburgh as a memorial to Juliette 
E. Blohme of the class of 1922 through a gift of 
$6,000, the interest on which may be used in 
whole or in part each year. 

Samuel J. Moritz Scholarship Fund. Established 
in 1960 as a memorial to Samuel J. Moritz, and 
made possible by a gift from Edward Moritz and 
LeRoy Moses, executors of his estate. The income 
provides scholarship aid annually to one or more 
students in need of financial assistance. 

The Christian C Yegen Scholarship Fund. Estab- 
lished in the spring of 1965 as a memorial to Mr. 
Christian C. Yegen, father of an alumna of the 
Cornell University-New York Hospital School of 
Nursing. 

Emmajean Steel Fuller Fund. This fund, begun 
by the class of 1952 in memory of Emmajean Steel 
Fuller, a former member of the class, is available 
for an occasional scholarship. 

Financial Assistance Administered 
by Outside Sources 

New York State Regents Scholarships, 
Grants, and Loans 

The following scholarships are available for resi- 
dents of New York State. The applicant should 
apply through his high school principal while he 
is still a student in high school. 

For more information on any of these, write to 
the State Education Department, State University 
of New York, Albany, New York 12224 requesting 
the leaflet Opening the Door to College Study 
through the New York State Regents Scholarship 
Examination. 

Regents Scholarships for Basic Professional Edu- 
cation in Nursing. Amount, $200-$500 a year 
depending upon financial need. Applicable only 
to period in the School of Nursing. 

Regents College Scholarships. Amount, $250- 
$1,000 a year depending upon financial need for 
a maximum of five years. Applicable to first two 
years of college and to period in the School of 
Nursing. 

Regents Scholarships in Cornell. A tuition-re- 
ducing scholarship ranging in amount from $100 
to $1,000 a year depending upon financial need 
for a maximum of five years. Applicable to first 



14 Financial Assistance 



two years 
of Nursing 



of college and to period in the School 



Regents Scholarships for Children of Deceased 
or Disabled Veterans. Amount, $450 a year for 
four years. Applicable to first two years of college 
and to period in the School of Nursing. 

New York Higher Education Assistance Corpora- 
tion sponsors a program through which students 
may obtain loans from local savings banks. 

Scholar Incentive Program. Grants of $100-$500 
yearly, depending on need and tuition paid, with 
minimum yearly grant of $100. For those students 
who demonstrate a capacity to pursue a degree 
and plan to attend college, and those who are 
presently in college and maintain satisfactory 
academic performance. 

Armed Services 

Army and Navy Nurse Corps Student Programs. 

Students in either of the basic nursing programs 
may apply for appointments in the Army Student 
Nurse Program, six to eight weeks prior to en- 
trance to the School, or to the Navy Nurse Corps 
Candidates Program prior to March 1 for fall 
entrance. The student must have had receipt of 
acceptance to Cornell University-New York Hos- 
pital School of Nursing before the applications 
will be considered. The appointments carry gen- 
erous financial allowance. A student who partici- 
pates twelve months or less serves on active duty 
in the respective service for twenty-four months. 
If two years of support has been given, the stu- 
dent serves thirty-six months. 

Public Health Nursing, New York State Depart- 
ment of Health Scholarship Program 

Students interested in public health nursing may 
be eligible for New York State Public Health 
scholarships. The scholarships are administered 
in the form of a tax-free stipend paid biweekly 
directly to the student during the senior year of 
the program in nursing. 

To be considered, the applicant must be recom- 
mended to the State Department of Health by 
the faculty of the School. In addition the applicant 
must be willing and able to accept full-time em- 
ployment for at least one year, beginning within 
one month following graduation in a local official 
health unit exclusive of the five boroughs of New 
York City. 

Applications are available at the School and 
should be filed early in the second semester of 
the fourth year. 



through cooperation with fellow students and 
faculty; to encourage in the student body maturity 
in matters of scholarship and personal conduct; 
to provide an all-inclusive organization through 
which business pertaining to the whole body of 
students may be transacted; and to foster an 
attitude of involvement in student life and de- 
velopment in the nursing program. 

Residence 

In general the School of Nursing is considered 
a resident school within the limits of its facilities. 
The Nurses' Residence has facilities for un- 
married, female students who are expected to 
live in unless a request to live out is made in 
writing. The request must be accompanied by a 
letter from a parent or guardian indicating knowl- 
edge and approval of the plan to live outside of 
the Residence. Single male students will be as- 
sisted to find housing within a reasonable distance 
of the School. Unfortunately married students 
cannot be guaranteed the same kind of assist- 
ance. Therefore, married students are urged to 
assume the responsibility for finding living facili- 
ties in the metropolitan area. Married women may 
live in the Residence, as long as they comply with 
regulations for living and pay the residence fee 
required of all female students. 

All students who live outside of the Residence 
must keep the Office of the Registrar informed of 
his or her correct address and telephone number. 
Each one is expected to maintain a mailbox in 
the Nurses' Residence, which he is responsible 
for checking once each day. The Student Hand- 
book should be checked for details of rules 
governing students who live in the Residence 
and those who do not. The Student Handbook 
also has information regarding the facilities of the 
Residence. 



Recreational Facilities 

Because the School believes that the education 
of young men and women today includes health- 
ful social relationships, provisions have been 
made for the development of such relationships 
in the life of the student. 

A social committee is responsible for a full and 
varied social calendar, which includes such 
activities as dances, skating parties, coffee hours, 
and suppers. Other activities in which students 
may participate are the yearbook and singing 
groups. The director of student relations is avail- 
able at all times to advise students in the organ- 
ization of discussion groups and in the planning 
of social and cultural activities. 



General Information 
School Government 

Any student entering this School is automatically 
a member of the student organization. The func- 
tions of this organization are to enhance the 
professional education of the individual student 



Health Services 

Good health is of the utmost importance and 
students have readily available a well-organized 
health service maintained in cooperation with the 
Personnel Health Service of The New York Hos- 
pital. 
A physical examination by a physician from 



Facilities for Instruction 15 



the Personnel Health Service, a tuberculin test, 
and a chest x ray are required upon admission. 
Subsequently, the student has either a chest x 
ray or tuberculin test every six months. Elective 
surgery and dental work are not included and, if 
not taken care of before admission to the School, 
must be done during vacations. 

Students who are ambulatory, with short-term 
minor illnesses, may receive meals in their rooms 
in the Nurses' Residence on recommendation of 
the physician in Personnel Health Service. Medi- 
cal supervision is provided through the Personnel 
Health Service. If students are more seriously ill, 
they are cared for in The New York Hospital 
within the limits of the Hospital's policy on ad- 
missions and bed usage. Students are required 
to enroll in the Associated Hospital Service plan 
available to all students in the Medical Center. 

If, in the opinion of the School authorities, the 
condition of a student's physical or emotional 
health makes it unwise for him to remain in the 
School, he may be required to withdraw, either 
temporarily or permanently, at any time. 

Counseling Services 

The School maintans active counseling services 
which are available to any student who needs 
assistance, either in connection with routine mat- 
ters that may come up in his work in the School 
or in connection with special personal problems. 

The director of student relations assists stu- 
dents in every way possible in their educational, 
personal, and social adjustment. She also co- 
operates with the faculty in helping the students 
in these areas and directs the students to those 
members of the staff who are best qualified to be 
of assistance in relation to the particular problem 
at hand. 

Group therapy is available to assist students 
whose effectiveness and adjustment are impaired 
by personal concerns. 



Facilities for Instruction 

The facilities of The New York Hospital-Cornell 
Medical Center provide the setting for a consider- 
able portion of the learning experiences offered 
to students in the School of Nursing. These in- 
clude classrooms, laboratories, clinical services, 
and libraries, set in an environment which pro- 
motes a spirit of inquiry. Additional learning ex- 
periences are provided through observations and 
practice in community agencies and other health 
service agencies. 

Clinical Facilities 

The clinical facilities of The New York Hospital 
provide unusual opportunity for the care and 
study of patients. The New York Hospital com- 
prises five clinical departments, largely self-con- 
tained. Each of these is provided not only with 
facilities adequate in every way for the care of 
both inpatients and outpatients, but also with 



facilities for teaching and the conduct of research. 
Many specialized clinical services are therefore 
available which are seldom found within a single 
organization. The Hospital has 1,100 beds and 
90 clinics. Approximately 34,000 patients are 
hospitalized and 50,000 treated as outpatients 
each year. The conduct of research in all clinical 
departments gives the student an opportunity to 
become increasingly aware of the part which the 
nurse must be prepared to play in research 
projects. Authenticity of the findings in many 
studies depends to no small degree on the ac- 
curacy with which the nurse carries out tests and 
procedures and observes and records reactions. 

The Medical and Surgical Departments include, 
in addition to general medicine and general sur- 
gery, pavilions devoted to the specialties of neu- 
rology and metabolism; urology; ear, nose, and 
throat disorders; plastic- and neurosurgery; and 
ophthalmology. The Lying-in Hospital has a ca- 
pacity of 163 adults and 77 newborns and pro- 
vides for obstetric and gynecologic patients. Each 
year, nearly 4,000 babies are born in this Hospital. 
Since this Center was founded in 1932, over 
100,000 babies have been born here. 

The Department of Pediatrics includes 117 
beds, with five floors for the care of infants, older 
children, and premature babies. Facilities for the 
recreation of convalescent children and the serv- 
ices of an occupational therapist offer oppor- 
tunities for the student to study the development 
and guidance of convalescent as well as sick 
children. 

The Payne Whitney Clinic for psychiatric care 
has a bed capacity of 108 patients, admitted from 
all socioeconomic groups and from all over the 
world. It is an intensive treatment center for 
psychotherapy, and its staff and resources are 
unusual. The student, therefore, has an oppor- 
tunity to participate in the care of patients with 
a variety of mental health problems. 

The Outpatient Department with its ninety 
clinics provides opportunity for the study of a 
large number of patients who come for general 
health supervision, for diagnosis of disease, and 
for treatment of disease that can be conducted 
on an ambulatory basis. Each year more than 
230,000 patient visits are made to this Depart- 
ment. Arrangements for continuity of care through 
use of referrals to public health nursing agencies 
are an essential part of all experiences. Oppor- 
tunity is provided for participation in the teaching 
of expectant parents through special classes and 
individual conferences and for study of the family 
approach to health maintenance and care of 
children. 

Public health nursing field experience is pro- 
vided in the following agencies: the Visiting Nurse 
Service of New York, the Visiting Nurse Associa- 
tion of Brooklyn, and the Bureau of Public Health 
Nursing, New York City Health Department. These 
agencies provide opportunity for the student to 
learn the application of public health principles 
in both voluntary and official agencies. 

Representatives of various governmental, vol- 
untary, and coordinating agencies plan with the 



16 The Library 

faculty for appropriate ways to contribute to the The reading room of the Library is located on 

student's knowledge of the community and of the first floor. Adjoining the reading room are the 
community organization for human services. sections for current journals, reference works, 

and monographs. The book stacks and carrels 
are on two floors below the main reading room. 
The clinical nursing departments have small 
The library, in the Samuel J. Wood Library and libraries containing literature pertaining especially 
Research Building, is shared by the students and to the subject matter of the department. These 
the faculties of both the School of Nursing and the collections, interlibrary loans, and photoduplicate 
Medical College, and the staff of The New York copies from other libraries, including the National 
Hospital. Library of Medicine, supplement the main library. 



The Library 



Description of Courses 



Nursing Courses 

153 Foundations of Nursing. Fall. Credit five hours 
theory, five hours laboratory. Miss Cotterell, chairman, 
and faculty. 

The course is composed of two units. The first is 
concerned with learning and practicing nursing skills 
basic to providing nursing care. In the second unit 
the nursing process will be introduced and applied 
to the care of adult patients with representative health 
problems. The clinical laboratory will be utilized to 
apply concepts and skills in caring for patients with 
these and other health problems. Pharmacology, nu- 
trition, and diet therapy are integrated throughout the 
course. 

154 Maternal-Child Nursing. Fall and spring. Pre- 
requisite: Nursing 153. Credit five hours theory, five 
hours clinical laboratory. Mrs. Natapoff, chairman, and 
faculty. 

Designed to utilize a family-centered approach to meet 
the nursing needs of pregnant women, and the needs 
of children in health and illness, from birth through 
adolescence. Emphasis is given to the preventive 
aspects of illness. Mental health concepts are inte- 
grated throughout the course. Clinical experiences will 
be provided in the hospital and other community 
agencies. 

155 Nursing for the Activation of Potential. Fall and 
spring. Prerequisite: Nursing 153. Credit six hours 
theory, five hours clinical laboratory. Miss Hansen, 
chairman, and faculty. 

Deals with the concepts and skills needed to work 
therapeutically with patients who have long-term emo- 
tional and/or physical illnesses. It emphasizes the 
behavioral approach toward the care of patients with 
neuromuscular and psychiatric disorders. Clinical ex- 
periences are provided in the home, a rehabilitation 
center, and an acute psychiatric setting. 

156 Introduction to the Nursing Process, Care of the 
Adult Patient. Fall. Credit five hours theory, five 
hours clinical laboratory. Miss Bielski and faculty. 
The course is composed of two units. The first is 
concerned with learning and practicing nursing skills 
basic to providing nursing care. In the second unit 
the nursing process will be introduced and applied 
to the care of adult patients with representative health 
problems. Pharmacology, Nutrition, and diet therapy 
are integrated throughout the course. The clinical 
laboratory will be utilized to apply concepts and skills 
in caring for patients with these and other health 
problems. 



157 Maternal-Child Nursing. Spring. Prerequisite: 
Nursing 156. Credit five hours theory, five hours 
clinical laboratory. Mrs. Natapoff, chairman, and 
faculty. 

Designed to utilize a family-centered approach to 
meet the nursing needs of pregnant women, and the 
needs of children in health and illness, from birth 
through adolescence. Emphasis is given to the pre- 
ventive aspects of illness. Mental health concepts are 
integrated throughout the course. Clinical experiences 
will be provided in the hospital and other community 
agencies. 

160 Interpersonal Processes in Nursing. Fall. Pre- 
requisite: psychology, three credits; sociology, three 
credits. Credit two hours. Miss Klimenko. 
Elements of the nurse-patient relationship will be 
examined with emphasis on techniques of interviewing, 
the professional commitment, stages of the relation- 
ship, therapeutic communication, and the utilization of 
the supervisory process. 

250 Transition to Nursing Practice. Spring. Prereq- 
uisite: Nursing 153, 154, 155. Credit five hours theory, 
seven hours clinical laboratory. Mrs. Hugo, chairman, 
and faculty. 

Provides students with the opportunity to further de- 
velop their nursing practice in selected health areas. 
The study of current and projected trends in nursing 
practice will serve as a basis for exploring the respon- 
sibilities of the professional nurse to himself, the 
patient, his profession, and his society. 

256 Community Health: Care of Patients with En- 
vironmentally Related Health Problems. Fall. Pre- 
requisite: Nursing 156, 157. Credit five hours theory, 
five hours clinical laboratory. Miss Keith and faculty. 
Focus is directed toward increasing students' under- 
standing of the role of the professional nurse in the 
care of individuals and families whose health problems 
necessitate a comprehensive community approach. In- 
cluded will be the basic principles of community 
health organizations and current and future trends in 
health care. Clinical experience in community health 
agencies, extended care facilities, and psychiatric 
facilities will be provided. 

257 Dimensions of Nursing. Spring. Prerequisite: 
Nursing 156, 157, 256. Credit two hours theory, eight 
hours clinical laboratory. Miss Miller and faculty. 
This course considers various aspects of professional 
nurse practice: caring for patients with multiple and 
complex nursing needs; having responsibility for nurs- 
ing care of many patients; and giving leadership to 



18 Description of Courses 



others participating in nursing care. A variety of hos- 
pital, home, and community settings will be utilized 
for clinical practice. 

Social Science and 
Related Courses 

107 Human Behavioral Development. Spring. Credit 
two hours. Dr. Lee Salk. 

The interaction of physiological, genetic, and environ- 
mental factors in conjunction with developmental 
stages will be presented in studying human behavioral 
development, with emphasis on the development of 
psychopathology. This will include all stages in de- 
velopment from early infancy through old age. Specific 
emphasis will be placed on child-rearing practices. 
Patients will be presented to demonstrate interviewing 
techniques and the child's emotional response to hos- 
pitalization. 

108 Introduction to Research. Spring. Credit three 
hours. Faculty to be appointed. 

The student is introduced to the basic skills needed 
for the critical evaluation of research material. Under- 
standing statistical concepts and biostatistics are in- 
cluded in the course. 

207 Nursing in the Social Order. Spring. Credit two 
hours. Dr. Lambertsen. 

The structure and function of both formal and informal 
social organizations are considered, especially as they 
influence the work of the professional nurse in the 
delivery of health services. 

246 Public Health. Fall. Credit two hours. Public 
Health nursing faculty. 

A study of community health needs and designs for 
meeting these needs. Programs and organizations 
participating in the formal and informal community 
health structure will be examined using an epidemio- 
logic framework. 



Biological Science Courses 

130 Biological Science. Fall. Credit four hours. Dr. 
Rubenstein. 

An introductory course designed to identify funda- 
mental concepts of structure and function in the 
human organism. Selected underlying anatomical and 
physiological disturbances that occur in man will be 
correlated with the clinical nursing course 153. Bio- 



chemical principles of metabolism, electrolytes and 
acid-base balance are integrated. 

131 Biological Science. Fall and Spring. Credit 
three hours. Dr. Rubenstein. 

A study of the reproductive cycle in man. The mecha- 
nisms of fertilization, the birth process, growth and 
maturation are included. Principles of heredity, and 
general embryology are explored. The causes of muta- 
tions in man and medical genetics are surveyed. This 
course will be correlated with the clinical nursing 
course 154. 

132 Biological Science. Fall and spring. Credit three 
hours. Mrs. Stolar. 

Morpholic and functional study of the nervous system 
in man with special reference to interference of normal 
pathways. Neurone physiology, neuroanatomy, receptor 
physiology, neural pathways as a basis for integrative 
activity and neuromuscular relationships are included. 
Degenerative processes in basic tissues will also be 
explored. Selected disturbances that occur in man 
will be correlated with the clinical nursing course 155. 

133 Biological Science. Fall. Credit three hours. 
Mrs. Stolar and faculty. 

An introduction to the properties and physiological 
processes common to all animals. Protoplasmic organ- 
ization, membrane characteristics, energetics, control 
systems, and cell division will be covered. The cardio- 
vascular-pulmonary and gastrointestinal systems will 
be studied. Emphasis will be placed on interference of 
normal function, mechanisms of compensation, tissue 
change, and sequelae. Hormones will be surveyed to 
understand their control of biological processes. 

134 Biological Science. Spring. Credit three hours. 
Mrs. Stolar and faculty. 

The reproductive cycle in man will be studied. Prin- 
ciples of heredity, general embryology, and develop- 
ment of organs and systems will be included. There 
will be a survey of the microorganisms detrimental to 
man. This course is designed to acquaint the student 
with communicable diseases that are endemic to so- 
ciety. Principles of immunity will be covered. 

135 Biological Science. Fall. Credit two hours. Mrs. 
Stolar and faculty. 

A survey of the microorganisms detrimental to man. 
Morphology, physiology, distribution, pathogenicity, 
and control will be included. This course is designed 
to acquaint the student with communicable diseases 
that are endemic in society. The correlation between 
disease patterns and social climate will be identified. 



Register 



Administration 
Cornell University 

Dale R. Corson, President of the University 
Robert A. Plane, University Provost 
W. Donald Cooke, Vice President for Research 
Lewis H. Durland, University Treasurer 
William D. Gurowitz, Vice President for Campus Affairs 
W. Keith Kennedy, Vice Provost 

Samuel A. Lawrence, Vice President for Administration 
E. Hugh Luckey, Vice President for Medical Affairs 
Thomas W. Mackesey, Vice President for Planning 
Paul L. McKeegan, Director of the Budget 
Arthur H. Peterson, University Controller 
Richard M. Ramin, Vice President for Public Affairs 
Neal R. Stamp, Secretary of the Corporation and Uni- 
versity Counsel 



The New York Hospital-Cornell 
Medical Center 

E. Hugh Luckey, M.D., President 

August H. Groeschel, M.D., Vice President 



The New York Hospital 

David D. Thompson, M.D., Director 
H. Henry Bertram, Director of Personnel 
Muriel R. Carbery, Director of Nursing Service 
Susan T. Carver, M.D., Associate Director 
George J. McBride, Comptroller 
Richard J. Olds, Associate Director 
Melville A. Piatt, M.D., Associate Director 
H. Mefford Runyon, Associate Director 
Cosmo J. LaCosta, Assistant Director 



Joint Administrative Board 

Representatives from the Board of Trustees of 
Cornell University 

Arthur H. Dean 

Stanton Griffis 

Dale R. Corson, Chairman 1972 

Robert W. Purcell 



Representatives from the Board of Governors of 
the Society of the New York Hospital 

Kenneth H. Hannan, Chairman 1971 
Francis Kernan 
Frederick K. Trask, Jr. 
John Hay Whitney 

Member at Large 

Walter B. Wriston 

Ex Officio Member 

E. Hugh Luckey, M.D. 

Cornell University — New York Hospital 
School of Nursing 

Eleanor C. Lambertsen, Ed.D., D.Sc.(Hon.), R.N., Dean 
Louise S. Hazeltine, M.A., R.N., Assistant Dean (A.B., 
Bucknell University, 1946; B.S., Cornell University- 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1949; M.A., 
New York University, 1959) 
Florence Tritt, M.A., R.N., Assistant to the Dean, School 
of Nursing (Diploma in Nursing, Winnipeg General 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1940; B.N., McGill Uni- 
versity, 1949; M.A., Columbia University, 1953) 
Meimi Joki, A.B., Administrative Assistant (A.B., Cor- 
nell University, 1948) 
Mary Elisabeth Riddick, Registrar 
Edna Johnson, Director of Student Relations 



Faculty 



Emeritus Professors 

Virginia M. Dunbar, M.A., R.N., Professor Emeritus of 

Nursing and Dean Emeritus 
Verda F. Hickox, M.A., R.N., Professor Emeritus of 

Nursing 
Mary Klein, M.A., R.N., Professor Emeritus of Nursing 
Margery T. Overholser, M.A., R.N., Professor Emeritus 

of Nursing 
Bessie A. R. Parker, B.S., R.N., Professor Emeritus of 

Nursing 
Veronica Lyons Roehner, M.A., R.N., Professor Emer- 
itus of Nursing 
Henderika J. Rynbergen, M.S., Professor Emeritus of 

Science 
Agnes Schubert, M.S., R.N., Professor Emeritus of 

Nursing 



20 Register 



Professors 

Muriel R. Carbery, M.S., R.N., Professor of Nursing; 
Director, Nursing Service (A.B., Hunter College, 
1933; Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School 
of Nursing, 1937; M.S., Catholic University of Amer- 
ica, 1951) 

Eleanor C. Lambertsen, Ed.D., D.Sc. (Hon.), R.N., Pro- 
fessor of Nursing; Dean, School of Nursing (Diploma 
in Nursing, Overlook Hospital School of Nursing, 
1938; B.S., Columbia University, 1949; A.M., 1950; 
Ed.D., 1957; D. Sc. (Hon.), Alfred University, 1969) 

Associate Professors 

Helen M. Berg, M.Ed., R.N., Associate Professor of 
Nursing; Department Head, Medical-Nursing (B.S., 
Bucknell University, 1948; B.S. in Nursing, Cornell 
University-New York Hospital School of Nursing, 
1951; M.Ed., Columbia University, 1968) 

Mary T. Bielski, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of 
Nursing (B.S., Cornell University-New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1949; M.A., Columbia University, 
1958) 

Dorothy Ellison, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of 
Nursing; Department Head, Operating Room Nursing 
(Diploma in Nursing, Colorado Training School for 
Nurses, 1946; B.A., University of Toronto, 1948; M.A., 
Columbia University, 1957) 

Marilyn T. Hansen, M.P.H., R.N., Associate Professor 
of Nursing (B.S.N., College of St. Rose, 1952; M.S. 
in Education, Siena College, 1960; M.P.H., Harvard 
University, 1970) 

Antonia Klimenko, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of 
Nursing (Diploma in Nursing, Mt. Sinai Hospital, 
1955; B.S., Hunter College, 1961; M.A., New York 
University, 1964) 

Marjorie A. Miller, M.S., R.N., Associate Professor of 
Nursing (Diploma in Nursing, Lutheran Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1948; B.S., Bryan College, 1949; 
M.S., Columbia University, 1954) 

Doris Schwartz, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of 
Nursing (Diploma in Nursing, Methodist Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1942; B.S., New York University, 
1953; M.A., 1958) 

Laura L. Simms, Ed.D., R.N., Associate Professor of 
Nursing; Department Head, Surgical Nursing (A.B., 
Texas Women's University, 1940; Diploma in Nurs- 
ing, Parkland Hospital School of Nursing, 1945; 
M.Ed., Southern Methodist University, 1950; Ed.D., 
Columbia University, 1963) 

Margie Warren, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of 
Nursing; Department Head, Outpatient Nursing (Di- 
ploma in Nursing, Protestant Deaconess Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1942; B.S., Indiana University, 
1950; M.A., Columbia University, 1957) 

Assistant Professors 

Marion Peters Braxton, M.P.H., R.N., Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Nursing (Diploma in Nursing, Lincoln 
School for Nurses, 1947; B.S., St. John's University, 
1962; M.P.H., School of Hygiene and Public Health, 
Johns Hopkins University, 1963) 

Margaret Cotterell, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of 
Nursing (Diploma in Nursing, Nuttall Memorial Hos- 
pital School of Nursing, Jamaica, W.I., 1950; B.S., 
Hunter College, 1958; M.A., Columbia University, 
1961) 

Alice DonDero, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Nurs- 
ing; Department Head, Pediatric Nursing (Diploma 
in Nursing, Long Island College Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1941; B.S., New York University, 1951; M.A., 
1959) 



I. Darlene Erlander, M.A., R.D., Assistant Professor of 
Nutrition (A.B., St. Olaf College, 1952; A.D.A., 1953; 
M.A., Columbia University, 1962) 

Elenora Haas, M.S., R.N., C.N.M., Assistant Professor 
of Nursing (Diploma in Nursing, Bishop De Goes- 
briand School of Nursing, 1944; B.S.Ed., Hunter 
College, 1958; M.S., Columbia University, 1961; 
C.N.M., Maternity Center Association, 1961) 

Eleanor Krohn Herrmann, M.S., R.N., Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Nursing (B.S., Adelphi University, 1957; 
M.S., University of Colorado, 1960) 

Alice A. Hugo, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Nurs- 
ing (Diploma in Nursing, The Roosevelt Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1946; B.S., New York University, 
1954; M.A., 1957) 

Gladys T. Jones, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of 
Nursing; Supervisor, Recovery Unit Nursing (Diploma 
in Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1944; B.S., Columbia University, 
1950; M.A., 1962) 

Jo Ann Keith, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Nurs- 
ing (B.S., Ohio State University, 1951; M.A., New 
York University, 1963) 

Helen M. McDowell, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of 
Nursing (Diploma in Nursing, Bellevue Schools of 
Nursing, 1956; B.S., New York University, 1956; M.A., 
Columbia University, 1960) 

Agnes Morgan, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of 
Nursing (Diploma, St. Vincent's Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1943; B.S., Columbia University, 1955; M.A., 
1963) 

Janet Nielson Natapoff, M.S., R.N., Assistant Professor 
of Nursing (B.S., Alfred University, 1960; M.S., Bos- 
ton University, 1963) 

Janet S. Reinbrecht, M.Ed., R.N., C.N.M., Assistant 
Professor of Nursing (B.S.N., University of Penn- 
sylvania, 1953; M.Ed., Columbia University, 1965; 
C.N.M., Graduate School of Midwifery Frontier Nurs- 
ing, Hyden, Kentucky, 1954) 

Reva Scharf Rubenstein, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of 
Science (B.S., Brooklyn College, 1959; Ph.D., Poly- 
technic Institute of Brooklyn, 1967) 

Vera Stolar, M.S., R.N., Assistant Professor of Science 
(Diploma in Nursing, Mount Sinai Hospital School 
of Nursing, 1947; B.S., Hunter College, 1961; M.S., 
1963) 

Marie D. Strickland, M.Ed., R.N., Assistant Professor 
of Nursing (B.S., Cornell University-New York Hos- 
pital School of Nursing, 1947; M.Ed., Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1965) 

Eleanor Taggart, M.S., R.N., Assistant Professor of 
Nursing (B.S., Cornell University-New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1957; M.S., Case Western Re- 
serve University, 1970) 

Edna E. Tuffley, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of 
Nursing; Department Head Private Patient Nursing 
Service (Diploma in Nursing, The Memorial Hospital 
School of Nursing, Pawtucket, R.I., 1933; B.S., New 
York University, 1948; M.A., 1949) 

Rita Reis Wieczorek, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor 
of Nursing (B.S., College of Mt. St. Joseph on the 
Ohio, 1964; M.A., New York University, 1966) 

Gloria E. Wilson, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of 
Nursing (Diploma in Nursing, Harlem Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1945; B.S.N.E., Duquesne Uni- 
versity, 1949; M.A., Columbia University, 1952) 

Instructors 

Eddie Mae Barnes, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Nursing; 

Director of Nursing, Payne Whitney Psychiatric 

Clinic (B.S., Dillard University, 1960) 
Patricia A. Donnellan, M.Ed., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 

(B.S.N. , Seton Hall University, 1958; M.A., St. Mary's 

College, 1963; M.Ed., Columbia University, 1969) 



Register 21 



Pamela J. Galehouse, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 
(B.S.N. , St. Olaf College, 1965; M.A., New York Uni- 
versity, 1969) 

Bernice Horner, M.S.N., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 
(Diploma in Nursing, St. Elizabeth Hospital, 1954; 
B.S.N., Catholic University, 1964; M.S.N., 1965) 

Anne Barbara Keane, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 
(B.S., Boston College, 1963; M.A., Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1968) 

Nancy Mayes, M.S., R.N., Instructor in Nursing (B.S., 
University of Oklahoma, 1964; M.S., 1970) 

Elaine Siu, M.Ed., R.N., Instructor in Nursing (B.S., 
University of Rochester, 1964; M.Ed., Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1969) 

Sharon Stowe, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Nursing (Di- 
ploma in Nursing, Kaiser Foundation School of 
Nursing, Oakland, Calif., 1958; B.S., University of 
Washington, 1964; M.A., New York University, 1968) 

Madeline S. Sugimoto, M.Ed., M.A., R.N., Instructor in 
Nursing (B.S., Cornell University-New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1958; M.A., Columbia University, 
1968; M.Ed., 1969) 

Eloise Lynch Werlin, M.S., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 
(B.S.N., Saint John College, 1966; M.S., University 
of Michigan, 1969) 

Frances J. Williams, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 
(Diploma in Nursing, Bellevue Schools of Nursing, 
1961; B.S., New York University, 1961; M.A., 1969) 

Associated with the Faculty 

Assistant in Instruction 

Marion Phyllis Cunningham, B.S., R.N., Assistant in 
Instruction (B.S. in Nursing, College of St. Teresa, 
1961) 

Staff of Coronary Care 
Nurse Training 

Nina T. Argondizzo, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of 
Medical Nursing (Diploma in Nursing, St. Elizabeth 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1944; B.S.N., St. John's 
University, 1954; M.A., Columbia University, 1958) 

Administrative and Supervisory 
Personnel (Nursing Service) 

M. Johanna Foster, M.A., R.N., Assistant Director 

Elizabeth Brooks, M.A., R.N., Assistant to the Director 
(Long-Range Planning) 

M. Eva Paton, M.A., R.N., Assistant to the Director, 
Home Care 

Marjorie Evans, M.A., R.N., Administrative Assistant, 
Nursing Studies 

Margaret Collins, R.N., Administrative Assistant, Nurs- 
ing Studies 

Claire Meyerowitz, M.A., R.N., Administrative Assistant, 
Nursing Studies 

Diana Vietor, B.S., R.N., Administrative Assistant, 
Nursing Studies 

Helen Doyle, A.B., Residence Director 

Lucille Wright, M.S., R.N., Nurse Epidemiologist 

Helen V. Miller, R.N., Administrative Assistant 

Isabel Cameron, B.S., R.N., Administrative Assistant 

Mary McCarthy, B.S., R.N., Coordinator, Nursing 
Service DeWitt Nursing Home 

Virginia Dericks, M.A., R.N., Consultant, Clinical Nurs- 
ing Specialist 

Lilian Henderson, M.A., R.N., Consultant, Clinical Nurs- 
ing Specialist 

Madeline Petrillo, M.Ed., R.N., Consultant, Clinical 
Nursing Specialist 

Barbara Rogoz, M.S., R.N., Consultant, Clinical Nursing 
Specialist 



Margaret H. Terry, M.A., R.N., Assistant to the Director 
for Staff Education 

Rosemary Branagan, M.A., R.N., Instructor, Staff Edu- 
cation 

Beatrice Panico, M.A., R.N., Instructor, Staff Education 

Lefa Rose, R.N., Instructor, Auxiliary Staff Education 

Francis Sheedy, B.S., R.N., Instructor, Auxiliary Staff 
Education 

Eleanor Young, R.N., Instructor, Staff Education 

Helen Gerchak, R.N., Assistant Instructor, Auxiliary 
Staff Education 

Jane D. Curtis, B.S., R.N., Administrative Assistant, 
Medical Nursing Service 

Katherine Blizzard, R.N., Supervisor, Medical Nursing 
Service 

Susan Myerson, M.A., R.N., Supervisor, Medical Nurs- 
ing Service 

Patricia Jones, B.S., R.N., Supervisor, Medical Nursing 
Service 

Anne Mattison, B.S., R.N., Supervisor, Medical Nursing 
Service 

Anna Olsen, B.S., R.N., Supervisor, Medical Nursing 
Service 

Diane Tose, C.N.M., R.N., Nurse Midwife, Obstetric 
Nursing Service 

Evelyne Paterniti, R.N., Supervisor, Medical Nursing 
Service 

Jeanne Dorie, M.A., R.N., Supervisor, Medical Nursing 
Service 

Elizabeth Traynor, M.A., R.N., Supervisor, Medical 
Nursing Service 

Christina Haas, M.A., R.N., Clinical Nursing Specialist, 
Medical Nursing Service 

Jo Ann Perry, B.S., R.N., Nurse Clinician, Medical 
Nursing Service 

Barbara Boyce, B.S., R.N., Nurse Clinician, Medical 
Nursing Service 

Mildred Burlingame, R.N., Supervisor, Obstetric and 
Gynecologic Nursing Service 

Grace Hammond, B.S., R.N., Supervisor, Obstetric and 
Gynecologic Nursing Service 

Mary Audrey Meehan, B.S., R.N., Supervisor, Obstetric 
and Gynecologic Nursing Service 

Eleanor M. Cato, B.S., R.N., Supervisor, Obstetric and 
Gynecologic Nursing Service 

Ruth Merkatz, B.S., R.N., Supervisor, Obstetric and 
Gynecologic Nursing Service 

Dorothy Metzger, M.A., R.N., Supervisor, Obstetric and 
Gynecologic Nursing Service 

Magdalene Mullin, B.S., R.N., Supervisor, Obstetric 
and Gynecologic Nursing Service 

Marjorie Sealey, B.A., R.N., Supervisor, Obstetric and 
Gynecologic Nursing Service 

Elizabeth D. Smith, M.A., R.N., Supervisor, Obstetric 
and Gynecologic Nursing Service 

Frances McCaulay, R.N., Nurse Clinician, Obstetric 
and Gynecologic Nursing Service 

Deborah Farber, B.S., R.N., Nurse Clinician, Obstetric 
and Gynecologic Nursing Service 

Virgene Richards, R.N., Administrative Assistant, Gen- 
eral Operating Room, Nursing Service 

Salome Husted, R.N., Administrative Assistant, General 
Operating Room, Nursing Service 

Dorothy Weightman, R.N., Administrative Assistant, 
Operating Room Nursing Service 

Frances Zokal, R.N., Administrative Assistant, Operat- 
ing Room Nursing Service 

Wanda Burley, M.A., R.N., Supervisor, General Operat- 
ing Room Nursing Service 

Doreen James, R.N., Administrative Assistant, Operat- 
ing Room Nursing Service 

Anna Ondovchik, M.S., R.N., Supervisor, Operating 
Room Nursing Service 



22 Register 



Eloise Cooke, R.N., Supervisor, Gynecologic Operating 
Room Nursing Service 

Roseanne Toter, R.N., Administrative Assistant, Out- 
patient Nursing Service 

Helen King, M.A., R.N., Administrative Assistant, Out- 
patient Nursing Service 

Carolyn Wagner, M.A., R.N., Administrative Assistant, 
Outpatient Nursing Service 

Mamie Wang, M.A., R.N., Administrative Assistant, Out- 
patient Nursing Service 

Mary Bartlett, M.A., R.N., Clinical Nursing Specialist, 
Outpatient Nursing Service 

Constance Derrell, M.A., R.N., C.N.M., Supervisor, Out- 
patient Nursing Service 

Alberta Evans, R.N., Supervisor, Outpatient Nursing 
Service 

Ena Fisher, R.N., Supervisor, Outpatient Nursing Ser- 
vice 

Marie Frohman, R.N., Supervisor, Outpatient Nursing 
Service 

Patricia O'Regan, M.A., R.N., Supervisor, Outpatient 
Nursing Service 

Carol Hanna, M.A., R.N., Administrative Assistant, 
Pediatric Nursing Service 

Phyllis Allen, M.A., R.N., Supervisor, Pediatric Nursing 
Service 

Geraldine Glass, M.A., R.N., Supervisor, Pediatric 
Nursing Service 

Barbara Morris, B.S., R.N., Supervisor, Pediatric Nurs- 
ing Service 

Mary Richardson, R.N., Supervisor, Pediatric Nursing 
Service 

Diana Newman, B.S., R.N., Acting Coordinator, Pre- 
mature Institutes 

Susan Blackburn, B.S., R.N., Nurse Clinician, Pediatric 
Nursing Service 

Gay Page Kelly, B.S., R.N., Nurse Clinician, Pediatric 
Nursing Service 

Eugenia Piszczatowska, M.A., R.N., Staff Assistant, 
Private Patients 

Rosemarie Bosco, B.S., R.N., Staff Assistant, Private 
Patients Nursing Service 

Gladys Dykstra, M.A., R.N., Staff Assistant, Private 
Patients Nursing Service 

Jane Geoghan, M.A., R.N., Supervisor, Private Patients 
Nursing Service 

Ursula MacDonald, R.N., Supervisor, Private Patients 
Nursing Service 

Shirley Richardson, B.S., R.N., Supervisor, Private 
Patients Nursing Service 

Kathleen M. Young, B.S., R.N., Staff Assistant, Private 
Patients Nursing Service 

Theresa Caron, M.A., R.N., Administrative Assistant, 
Surgical Nursing Service 

Grace Brown, M.A., R.N., Supervisor, Surgical Nursing 
Service 

Tillie Cherhoniak, R.N., Supervisor, Surgical Nursing 
Service 

Loretta Kilfoyle, M.A., R.N., Supervisor, Surgical Nurs- 
ing Service 

Ludvina Kroemer, B.S., R.N., Supervisor, Surgical 
Nursing Service 

Mary Pozniak, M.S., R.N., Supervisor, Surgical Nursing 
Service 

Amy Chou, M.A., R.N., Clinical Supervisor, Surgical 
Nursing Service 

Sally Everson, B.S., R.N., Nurse Clinician, Surgical 
Nursing Service 

Alene Haas, B.S., R.N., Nurse Clinician, Surgical Nurs- 
ing Service 

Emelia Luddy, M.A., R.N., Nurse Clinician, Surgical 
Nursing Service 

Mary Ann Schmidt, B.S., R.N., Nurse Clinician, Surgical 
Nursing Service 



Cooperating Groups 

Advisory Committee on Prenursing 
Students on the Ithaca Campus 

Placement Service 

Mrs. Ann Rogers, Assistant Director, Placement Ser- 
vice (Women's Placement) 

Guidance and Testing Center 

Howard G. Andrus, Professor, Guidance and Personnel 
Administration 

College of Human Ecology 

Jean Failing, Professor, Associate Dean for Under- 
graduate Education 

College of Arts and Sciences 

John M. Anderson, Professor of Zoology 

College of Agriculture 

Howard S. Tyler, Professor in Personnel Administration 
(Vocational Guidance and Placement) 

Office of Admissions 

Robert Storandt, Director of Admissions 

Alumnae Association 

Eleanor Taggart, '57, President 

Committee for Scholarships 

Mrs. Robert F. Shuping, President 



Class of 1972 

The name of the student is followed by his home 
address. The college or university from which he 
transferred is given in parentheses. 

Program I 

Adams, Lois Carol, West Caldwell, New Jersey (Juniata 
College) 

Bavaro, John A., Inwood, New York (State University 

at Stony Brook) 
Bayer, Lynn Josephine, West Hempstead, New York 

(Hofstra University) 
Benjamin, Brenda Delores, Springfield Gardens, New 

York (Hunter College) 
Bilski, Ellen Dianne, Jermyn, Pennsylvania (Marywood 

College) 
Boemi, Marlene, Englewood, New Jersey (DePauw 

University) 
Brosnan, Maureen Ann, Bay Shore, New York (D'- 

Youville College) 
Budrius, Charlene, Woodbury, Connecticut (Bay Path 

Junior College) 
Butt, Kathleen Therese, Wantagh, New York (D'You- 

ville College) 

Caldwell, Dorothea, New York, New York (Manhattan 
Community College) 

Carr, Susan Shelby, New York, New York (Centenary 
College) 

Cheng, Nora, Beechhurst, New York (C. W. Post Col- 
lege) 

Cherowitzo, Judy Chock, Brooklyn, New York (City 
College) 

Dietz, Elizabeth, Valley Stream, New York (Upsala 
College) 



Register 23 



Donnarumma, Barbara Anne, Westwood, New Jersey 
(College of New Rochelle) 

Engh, Sharon Anne, Sycamore, Illinois (Bucknell 
University) 

Fairchild, Anne-Marie, Tenafly, New Jersey (Alfred 
University) 

Ferguson, Elisabeth Alexandra, Scarsdale, New York 
(Middlebury College) 

Fleming, Barbara Benson, Chatham, New Jersey (Con- 
necticut College) 

Fox, Jane Ann, Douglaston, New York (Good Counsel 
College) 

Goldsmith, Bonnie Dale, Brooklyn, New York (Brooklyn 
College) 

Grace, Mary Jane, Freeville, New York (Cornell Uni- 
versity) 

Hargrove, Luradine, New York, New York (Cornell 
University) 

Hickey, Deidre Anne, Hawthorne, New York (St. Bona- 
venture College) 

Hill, Susan Ann, Elbridge, New York (Cornell Uni- 
versity) 

Hirshberg, Rosilyn Ruth, West Orange, New Jersey 
(Montclair State College) 

Hubbell, Marcia Mitchell, Fall Church, Virginia (Drew 
University) 

Humble, Janet Ruth, Cherry Hill, New Jersey (Douglass 
College) 

Iddles, Andrea, Harwich, Massachusetts (Lasell Junior 
College) 

Jacobs, Lynn, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (Boston Uni- 
versity) 

Jeffreys, Victoria Anne, Pelham, New York (Green 
Mountain College) 

Johns, Jane Struthers, New York, New York (Drew 
University) 

Jordan, Karen Lee, Willingboro, New Jersey (Douglass 
College) 

Lange, Jan Holly, Yonkers, New York (Concordia Col- 
legiate Institute) 

Lewis, Karen Meredith, Levittown, New York (Cornell 
University) 

Linton, Mary Louise, Setauket, New York (State Uni- 
versity at Stony Brook) 

Littman, Lillian Sarlotta, Manhasset Hills, New York 
(American University) 

Lundgren, Linda Jean, Glen Cove, New York (Hofstra 
University) 

Lynaugh, Kathleen F., Bronx, New York (Fordham 
University) 

Mattison, Carolyn Ann, Brooklyn, New York (Elizabeth 
Seton College) 

McBride, Catherine Elizabeth, New York, New York 
(D'Youville College) 

McGrory, Francine Ann, New York, New York (Eliza- 
beth Seton College) 

McNamara, Virginia Anne, New York, New York (Eliza- 
beth Seton College) 

Mulder, Margaret Eileen, Glen Cove, New York (Mary- 
wood College) 

Nakamoto, Ann, Kaneohe, Hawaii (University of Hawaii) 
Needleman, Darlene H., Wantagh, New York (Boston 

University) 
Nordberg, Mary Jean, Emporium, Pennsylvania (Nyack 

Missionary College) 



O'Neill, Sharon Ann, East Norwich, New York (College 
of Mount Saint Vincent) 

Orans, Sherry Lee, Brookline, Massachusetts (Boston 
University) 

O'Sullivan, Maureen Katherine, Rosemont, Pennsyl- 
vania (Dunbarton College) 

Ozoroski, Michaelene, Point Pleasant Beach, New 
Jersey (Newton College) 

Pacyna, Sharon Elizabeth, New Britain, Connecticut 

(Newton College) 
Parrasch, Susan Lynn, River Edge, New Jersey (Elmira 

College) 
Perley, Rosemary Bernadette, Larchmont, New York 

(Centenary College) 
Perry, Arlene Ida, West Rutland, Vermont (The King's 

College) 
Plunkett, Nancy Christine, Yonkers, New York (Le- 

Moyne College) 
Presser, Linda Merle, New York, New York (Hunter 

College) 

Radioli, Mary Ann E., Brooklyn, New York (St. Joseph's 

College) 
Reilly, Katherine Ann, Brooklyn, New York (Marymount 

College) 
Rock, Barbara Jeanne, River Edge, New Jersey 

(Douglass College) 
Rubin, Karen Janet, Brooklyn, New York (Brooklyn 

College) 

Sanders, Lorraine, Brooklyn, New York (Manhattan 
Community College) 

Sayle, Suzanne F., Cleveland, Ohio (Briarcliff College) 

Scholl, Catherine Midge, Tafton, Pennsylvania (Penn 
State University) 

Scionti, Victoria Marie, Wallingford, Connecticut (Al- 
bertus Magnus College) 

Siegel, Andrea L., Plattsburgh, New York (Stephens 
College) 

Singer, Sharman Lila, Bayside, New York (York 
College) 

Slattery, Donna Marie, Ithaca, New York (Cornell Uni- 
versity) 

Strauss, Marcia Tunick, Harrison, New York (York 
College) 

Sweeney, Nancy M., Cranford, New Jersey (Connecti- 
cut College) 

Szczepanski, Mary Alice, Buffalo, New York (D'You- 
ville College) 

Usher, Rhonda Bernstein, Scarsdale, New York (Benn- 
ington College) 

Vaughan, Margaret Fenley, Grosse Pointe, Michigan 
(Earlham College) 

Watson, Sarah Ann, Stockbridge, Massachusetts (Cor- 
nell University) 

Program II 

Burton, Leslie Ann, South Boston, Massachusetts 
(Emmanuel College) 

Duchen, Katherine Louise, Des Moines, Iowa (Univer- 
sity of Iowa) 

Elliott, Robert Lloyd, Hancock, New York (Houghton 
College) 

Gill, Mary Ellen Dorothy, Fort Lee, New Jersey (Mary- 
mount College) 

Haenn, Barbara Marie, Haverford, Pennsylvania (St. 
Mary's College) 



24 Register 



Hoecke, Louise E., New York, New York (Houghton 
College) 

Kaiser, Linda S., Yonkers, New York (City College) 
Klein, Penny Kaplan, Brooklyn, New York (Brooklyn 
College) 

Lilja, Paul Stuart, Lindenhurst, New York (State Uni- 
versity at Buffalo) 

Limbacher, Edith Maud, Ridgewood, New Jersey 
(Mount Holyoke College) 

McKee, Louise Sykes, Nashville, Tennessee (Centre 

College) 
McLaughlin, Cyrille A., Whitestone, New York (Notre 

Dame College) 
Miller, Bonnie Rosemarie, Granby, Connecticut (New 

York University) 



Nolan, Thomas Francis, Bronx, New York (St. John's 
University) 

Tenney, Joyce Bennett, Hanover, New Hampshire 
(Mount Holyoke College) 

von Hellens, Sister Anita Marie, New York, New York 
(Marymount College) 

Warwick, Elizabeth Lyyli, New York, New York (Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts) 

Waters, Stephen Edward, Queens Village, New York 
(St. John's University) 

Werner, Cathy Laraine, New York, New York (Occi- 
dental College) 

Wheeler, Ann Judson, Darien, Connecticut (Sweet 
Briar College) 

Winkler, Julie, Northport, New York (University of 
Kansas) 



Index 



Academic standing, 10 

Acceptance, dates of, 10; fee, 12 

Accreditation, 8 

Administration, 19 

Admission, 9-10; general requirements, 9; Program I, 9; 

Program II, 10 

Advisory Committee, 22 

Alumnae Association, 22 

Applications, 10; dates for filing, 10; fee, 12; 

request for, 27 

Armed Forces programs, 14 

Army Nurse Program, 14 

Assistance, financial, 12 

Bills, payment of, 12 
Biological science courses, 18 

Calendar, 5 

Clinical facilities, 15 

College Scholarship Service, 12 

Committee for Scholarships, 22 

Community Health, 17 

Cornell Medical Center, 7; Joint Board, 19 

Cornell University, 7; administration, 19 

Counseling services, 15 

Courses: plan for Program I, 9; plan for Program II, 9; 

course descriptions, 17-18 

Dean's List, criteria for, 10 

Degree, requirements, 11; with distinction, 11 

Department of Health, 15 

Dimensions of Nursing, 17 

Dismissal, 10-11 



Expenses, 11 



15; 



Facilities, clinical, 15; for instruction, 

recreational, 14; residence 14 

Faculty, 19-21 

Fees, 12 

Financial assistance, 12-14; application for, 13; 

dates for administering, 13 

Foundations of Nursing, 17 

Government, School, 14 
Grades, 11 
Grants, 13 

Health services, 14-15 

History of School, 7 

Honor Society, 11 

Human Behavioral Development, 18 



Information, request for, 27; visit for, 10 
Interpersonal Processes in Nursing, 17 
Introduction to Nursing, 17 
Instruction facilities, 15 
Instructors, 20-21; assistant, 21 

Library, 16 
Living out, 14 

Male students, 14 
Married students, 14 
Maternal-Child Nursing, 17 

Navy Nurse Program, 14 

New York Hospital, 7; administration, 19; facilities for 

instruction, 15; supervisory staff (nursing service), 

21-22 

Nursing courses, 17 

Nursing for Activation of Potential, 17 

Nursing major, 8 

Objectives, 8 

Philosophy, 8 
Professional program, 8 
Professors, 20; assistant, 20; associate, 20; 
emeritus, 19 

Public Health, course, 18; New York State Scholar- 
ship, 14 

Recreational facilities, 14 

Refunds, 12 

Regents awards, 13 

Register, 19 

Registration, late, 12; state, 11 

Research, Introduction to, 18 

Residence, 14; male students, 14; married students, 14; 

single women, 14 

Scholar Incentive Program, 14 

Scholarships, 13 

Sigma Theta Tau, 11 

Social Order, Nursing in the, 18 

Social science courses, 18 

Students, 22-24 

Transition to Nursing Practice, 17 
Tuition, 11 

Visiting Nurse, 15 
Visits to the School, 10 

Withdrawal, 10-11; refund for, 12 



Cornell University 
Announcements 

The Cornell Announcements are designed to give 
prospective students and others information about 
the University. The prospective student should 
have a copy of the Announcement of General 
Information; after consulting that, he may wish to 
write for one or more of the following 
Announcements: 

New York State College of Agriculture 

College of Architecture, Art, and Planning 

College of Arts and Sciences 

Department of Asian Studies 

Education 

College of Engineering 

School of Hotel Administration 

New York State College of Human Ecology 

New York State School of Industrial and Labor 

Relations 
Officer Education (ROTC) 
Summer Session 

Undergraduate preparation in a recognized 
college or university is required for admission to 
certain Cornell divisions, for which the following 
Announcements are available: 

Graduate School: Biological Sciences 
Graduate School: Humanities 
Graduate School: Physical Sciences 
Graduate School: Social Sciences 
Law School 

New York State Veterinary College 
Graduate School of Business and Public 

Administration 
Graduate School of Nutrition 
Medical College (New York City) 
Cornell University — New York Hospital School of 

Nursing (New York City) 
Graduate School of Medical Sciences (New York 

City) 

Requests for the publications listed above may be 
addressed to 

CORNELL UNIVERSITY ANNOUNCEMENTS 
Edmund Ezra Day Hall 
Ithaca, New York 14850 

(The writer should include his zip code.) 



Further Information 
and Application 

It is important that persons interested in 
pursuing one of the programs at the School of 
Nursing make plans well in advance so that their 
college programs may be arranged to provide 
the necessary background. 

To receive assistance in such planning, an 
interested student should fill out the form below 
and send it to 

Registrar 

Cornell University — New York Hospital School of 

Nursing 

1320 York Avenue 

New York, New York 10021. 

The writer should include his zip code. 



Request Form 



□ I wish to receive further information. Please 
place my name on your mailing list. 

□ I wish to apply for admission in September 



year 

Please send me an application blank for 

□ Program I (after two years of college) 

□ Program II (after four years of college) 



street address 



city 



state 



zip 



date of birth 



name of high school 



address 



date diploma received or expected 



name of college 



address 



Cornell University 
Announcements 

Cornell University-New York Hospital 

School of Nursing 

1972-73 



Cornell University 



Cornell University-New York Hospital 

School of Nursing 

1320 York Avenue 

New York, New York 10021 

1972-73 



Cornell University Announcements 

Volume 64 of the Cornell University Announcements 
consists of twenty-two catalogs, of which this is 
number 13, dated August 4, 1972. Publication dates: 
twenty-two times a year (four times in September; 
three times in March and June; twice in January, 
July, October, and November; once in April, 
May, August, and December). Publisher: Cornell 
University, Sheldon Court, 420 College Avenue, 
Ithaca, New York 14850. Second-class postage paid 
at Ithaca, New York. 



Academic Calendar 



1972-73* 



Orientation, entering class, begins 9:00 a.m. 

Orientation, entering class, ends 5:00 p.m. 

Registration 

Labor Day holiday 

Fall term instruction begins, all classes, 8:00 a.m. 

Opening convocation 

School holiday 

Mid semester grades due, 5:00 p.m. (Class of 1973) 

School holiday 

Progress grades due, 5:00 p.m. (Class of 1974) 

Instruction suspended, 1:00 p.m. 

Thanksgiving recess 

Instruction resumed, 7:30 a.m. 

Fall term instruction ends, 5:00 p.m. 

Study period 

Final examinations and clinical evaluation begin, 9:00 a.m. 

Final examinations & clinical evaluation end, 5:00 p.m. 

Christmas recess and intersession 

Registration, new and rejoining students 

Registration, continuing students 

Spring term instruction, all classes, begins 9:00 a.m. 

Spring recess 

Instruction resumed, 7:30 a.m. 

Midsemester grades due, 5:00 p.m. 

Spring term instruction ends, 5:00 p.m. 

Study period 

Final examinations and clinical evaluation begin, 9 a.m. 
Final examinations & clinical evaluation end, 5 p.m. 
Memorial Day holiday 
Convocation and commencement 



Wednesday, August 30 
Thursday, August 31 
Friday, September 1 
Monday, September 4 
Tuesday, September 5 

Monday, October 16 
Friday, October 27 
Tuesday, November 7 
Friday, November 17 
Wednesday, November 22 

Monday, November 27 
Monday, December 18 
Tuesday, December 19 
Wednesday, December 20 
Friday, December 22 

Thursday, February 1 
Friday, February 2 
Monday, February 5 
Saturday, March 24 
Monday, April 2 
Wednesday, April 4 
Friday, May 18 
Monday, May 21 
Tuesday, May 22 
Wednesday, May 23 
Friday, May 25 
Monday, May 28 
Wednesday, May 30 



* The dates shown in the Academic Calendar are subject to change at any time by 
official action of Cornell University. 

In enacting this calendar, the University Senate has scheduled classes on religious 
holidays. It is the intent of Senate legislation that students missing classes due to 
the observance of religious holidays be given ample opportunity to make up work. 



Contents 



Academic Calendar 2 

History of the School 5 

Accreditation 6 

The Undergraduate Program 6 

Admission 7 

Academic Standing 8 

State Registration 9 

Expenses 9 

Financial Assistance 10 

General Information 13 

Division of Continuing Education 14 

Facilities for Instruction 14 

Description of Courses 17 

Register 19 

Index 23 

Application 25 

List of Announcements 27 



The courses and curricula described in this 
Announcement, and the teaching personnel listed 
herein, are subject to change at any time by official 
action of Cornell University. 



«!-:■' 




Cornell University- New York Hospital 
School of Nursing 



History of the School 



The Cornell University-New York Hospital School of 
Nursing was established as a school in Cornell 
University in 1942, on the sixty-fifth anniversary of the 
founding of The New York Hospital School of 
Nursing, one of the earliest nursing schools in the 
country. The School is part of the New York Hospital- 
Cornell Medical Center, which includes also the 
Cornell University Medical College and the various 
buildings of The New York Hospital extending from 
Sixty-eighth to Seventy-first Streets on the East River. 

The Center is a joint undertaking of The Society of the 
New York Hospital and Cornell University, committed 
to a fourfold purpose in the (1) care of the sick, 
providing the same wisdom and skill to rich and poor; 
(2) education of doctors and nurses, research 
workers, technicians, and others who will work in the 
field of medical science; (3) research to extend the 
boundaries of knowledge in the health fields; and 
the (4) promotion of public health through the 
development of preventive medicine. 

The New York Hospital is the second-oldest voluntary 
hospital in this country, its Royal Charter having been 
granted in 1771, in the reign of King George III. The 
first patients were soldiers wounded in the Revo- 
lutionary War. At that time the Hospital was located 
on the lower end of Manhattan, the only part of the 
city then settled. On early maps the location 
was designated simply as "the Hospital." 

Cornell University, with its campus in Ithaca, New 
York, received its charter in 1865. Three circum- 
stances contributed to the founding of the University 
in the eventful years that marked the close of the 
Civil War. In the first place, Ezra Cornell, a citizen of 
Ithaca, had come into a large fortune from his 
holdings in the newly formed Western Union Tele- 
graph Company and had devoted much thought to 
the good that might be done by giving his wealth 
to education. A second circumstance was the fact 
that the state of New York had received a substantial 
land grant, under the Morrill Act of 1862, for the 
support of colleges teaching agriculture and the 
mechanical arts. The third circumstance was that Mr. 
Cornell had as a colleague in the state legislature 



of 1864-65, a young senator named Andrew D. White, 
later to become the first president of the University, 
who had the vision of preserving the state's land 
grant intact for a single great institution which should 
teach not only agriculture and the mechanical arts 
but the humanities and the sciences as well. The 
Medical College, the School of Nursing, and the 
Graduate School of Medical Sciences are the 
divisions of the University which are located in New 
York City. 

The Hospital had been operating for over one hundred 
years before a school for the training of nurses was 
opened. Early steps had been taken, however, to 
improve the care given to patients. In 1799 Dr. 
Valentine Seaman, a scholar and prominent physician, 
had organized a series of lectures, combined with 
a course of practical instruction in the wards, for the 
women whom the Hospital had engaged as 
"watchers" and "nurses." Although the theoretical 
content was meager and the practical instruction 
not systematically planned, these classes focused 
attention on the fact that women who had some 
preparation for their work gave better care than 
those without instruction. When, in 1873, the first 
training school in this country on the Nightingale 
pattern was opened in Bellevue Hospital, the 
Governors of The Society of the New York Hospital 
contributed to its support. Four years later, in 1877, 
when the Hospital moved to new buildings, The 
New York Hospital Training School for Nurses was 
opened in quarters which were considered to have 
all the modern improvements of the times. The 
School moved to the present location when the 
Medical Center was opened in 1932. 

The health needs of the community and country have 
been the guiding force in the development of the 
School, which has modified its program to keep pace 
with these needs. Today, the work of the professional 
nurse requires much more self-direction and leader- 
ship ability than in the past, and, in recognition of 
this, the University program was established in 1942. 
Since 1946, all students admitted to the School have 
been candidates for the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Nursing. 



6 The Undergraduate Program 



The Division of Continuing Education was organized 
as an educational unit of the School of Nursing 
in 1971. Although it is a non-degree granting division 
of the school, it has the same status within the 
structure as the organizational unit for undergraduate 
programs leading to a degree. 

The Cornell University-New York Hospital School of 
Nursing Alumnae Association, originally the Alumnae 
Association of The New York Hospital School of 
Nursing, was organized in 1893. It was one of the 
ten alumnae associations which helped to bring about 
the national professional organization of nurses, now 
known as the American Nurses' Association. In 
1945 the Alumnae Association became a part of the 
Cornell University Alumni Association. 



Accreditation 

The School is accredited by the Department of 
Baccalaureate and Higher Degree Programs of the 
National League for Nursing as a generic college 
program leading to a baccalaureate degree. 

The School is registered by the State Education 
Department, Division of Professional Education of 
the University of the State of New York. 



As a professional person he recognizes the need to 
continue to develop his personal and professional 
competence through the formal and informal edu- 
cational structures which are best suited to his needs 
and abilities. 

Objectives 

Upon completion of the program, the graduate 
functions as a beginning-level professional nurse 
practitioner in a variety of settings. 

The graduate will: 

(1) use the intellectual skills of observation, assess- 
ment, planning, and evaluation to establish and 
implement nursing goals; (2) understand how man 
functions in relationship to himself and others in 
health and sickness; (3) apply principles of leader- 
ship in directing nursing care of patients; (4) 
function as a colleague with members of an inter- 
disciplinary team; (5) possess a foundation for 
continuing professional development in nursing; (6) 
maintain the standards of nursing services through 
constant assessment of existing practices and 
through participation in professional and community 
organizations; and (7) recognize the structures of 
a variety of health care systems and the effect which 
the structure has on the nature of nursing practice. 



The Undergraduate Program 

The School accepts its responsibility for the prepara- 
tion of a professional nurse by offering a curriculum 
based on the following philosophy and objectives. 



Philosophy 

Education is a process which helps the individual 
to develop his potential so that he may function 
productively within existing and changing social 
systems. This is a dynamic process involving the 
active participation of the learner and the teacher. The 
school provides the environment in which the learner 
can test his 'abilities and evaluate his progress. 

The major purposes of the general education courses 
preceding the nursing major are: to instill knowledge; 
to cultivate intellectual skills; and to nurture the 
traits of personality and character basic to a reasoned 
and responsible life. Because of the foundation 
provided by these courses, it is anticipated that the 
student will be prepared to better understand him- 
self, his social and physical environment, and the 
role of the professional nurse in society. 

The professional nurse assumes responsibility for 
maintaining optimum standards for the planning, 
evaluation, and the delivery of nursing care in a 
variety of settings. The professional nurse also func- 
tions as a member of the interdisciplinary health 
team in the planning, evaluation, and delivery of 
health care. 

He recognizes the need to speak on both community 
and professional issues which are within his field of 
competence or interest and assists in promoting 
the public involvement in health by defining and 
clarifying health issues. 






The Nursing Major 

The nursing major, consisting of four semesters of 
full-time study, is offered in two programs identified 
as Program I and Program II. Both programs are 
based upon the philosophy that general education 
courses provide the foundation for the professional 
courses of the nursing major. In keeping with this 
philosophy, course requirements in the humanities, 
social sciences, and natural sciences have been 
identified as prerequisites for both programs. Sixty 
general education credits are required for admission 
to Program I. In addition to presenting the required 
prerequisites for the nursing major, students who 
enroll in Program II are required to hold a bacca- 
laureate degree in another discipline before 
admission to the professional program. Both pro- 
grams lead to the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Nursing. 

Each student entering the school is expected to 
complete the entire program for which he is enrolled. 
To meet the objectives of the program, students will 
have clinical experiences in a variety of hospital 
and community settings. In order to be eligible for 
the degree from Cornell, the last year must be 
spent in full-time study in one of these programs. 
The faculty reserves the right to make changes in the 
curriculum which it believes are in keeping with the 
changing needs of society or the best interests of 
the student and the school. 

The programs are planned so that the student moves 
from less-complex situations in the care of individ- 
uals and families, to those situations which test his 
ability to provide leadership in the delivery of health 
services. 



Admission 7 



Initially attention is focused on the acquisition of 
nursing skills and the role of the professional nurse 
in the care of adult patients. 

In the courses of the second and third semester, the 
student studies the patient in the hospital, the home, 
and the community. The content of one semester 
deals with the family in which child bearing women, 
their children, and their families, provide the focus 
for the learning experiences. The content and 
experiences offered in the alternate semester pro- 
vide the student with the opportunity to explore the 
needs of patients and families who are facing 
problems of short- and long-term physical and 
emotional illnesses. Study of the effect of the envi- 
ronment upon health and disease is correlated with 
the content of this semester. 

In the final semester the student cares for patients 
with multiple nursing needs including more complex 
medical-surgical problems. The student learns the 
principles of leadership and has the opportunity to 
apply them in the clinical setting. 

Courses in the biological and social sciences are 
offered concurrently with the nursing courses. 
Pharmacology, nutrition, and diet therapy are 
included in the nursing courses of the curriculum. 

Plan of Program I 

Detailed descriptions of the courses listed below are 
found on pp. 17-18. 

Third Year 

Fall semester Hours 

Nursing 153-156 10 

Nursing 160 2 

Biological Science 130* or 4 

Biological Science 133* 3 



15 or 16 



Spring semester 
Nursing 154-157* 
Social Science 107 
Biological Science 131-134 



10 
2 
3 

15 



Fourth Year 
Fall semester 
Nursing 155* 
Public Health 246 
Biological Science 132-136 



11 
2 
3 

16 

12 
3 
2 

17 

* Registration in these courses is by advisement and with 
permission of the instructor. 

Plan of Program II 

Detailed descriptions of the courses listed below are 
found on pp. 17-18. 



Spring semester 
Nursing 250 
Social Science 108 
Social Science 207 



First Year 
Fall semester 
Nursing 153-156 
Nursing 160 
Biological Science 133 



Spring semester 
Nursing 154-157 
Social Science 107 
Biological Science 131-134 



Second Year 

Fall semester 

Nursing 256 

Biological Science 132-136 



Spring semester 
Nursing 257 
Social Science 108 
Social Science 207 



Hours 

10 

2 

3 

15 

10 
2 
3 

15 



10 
3 

13 

12 
3 
2 

17 



Admission 

General Requirements 

The number of applicants with minimum qualifications 
exceeds the number of students that can be admitted 
to the two programs of the nursing major each year. 
Applicants selected will be those who, in 
competition with others seeking admission at the 
same time, have demonstrated by their qualifications 
that they are well fitted for the nursing profession. 

Evaluation of the candidate's ability to profit from the 
instruction at the School of Nursing is based on his 
secondary-school and college records, the 
recommendations of school authorities, and the 
results of standardized achievement tests. Evidence of 
the candidate's ability to make effective use of free 
time, as well as his capacity for leadership and 
concern for others, is given due consideration; 
evaluations are made on the basis of extra curricular 
activities, references, and an interview. An extensive 
medical report is required because of the nature 
of the professional program. 

A student already enrolled in the nursing major of 
another college or university may request the 
evaluation of his college record for possible transfer 
to this School. 

It is the policy of Cornell University actively to support 
the American ideal of equality of opportunity for all 
and no student shall be denied admission or otherwise 
discriminated against because of race, color, creed, 
religion, or national origin. 

Specific Requirements for Program I 

Students who have completed a minimum of sixty 
semester hours in any university, college, or junior 
college accredited by one of the regional associations 



8 Academic Standing 



of colleges and secondary schools may apply for 
transfer to the nursing major of Program I. 

The following distribution of courses is to be used as 
a guideline in planning a program for the first two 
years of college. Records will be reviewed on an 
individual basis and adjustments made. 

Communications, 6 credits: composition, public 
speaking, or speech 

Humanities, 20-30 credits: art, language, literature, 
music, philosophy, religion 

Natural science and mathematics, 12 credits. College 
biology (4 credits) and college chemistry (4 credits) 
are required. Based on individual evaluation, other 
college science and mathematics may be accepted 
in place of additional credits in biology and chemistry. 

Social science and history, 12-22 credits: sociology 
(3 credits required), psychology (3 credits required), 
political science, anthropology, economics 

Specific Requirements for Program II 

Persons who hold or are to be awarded a 
baccalaureate degree by an accredited senior college 
or university may be considered for admission to this 
program of the nursing major. Applicants to this 
program will be required to take selected 
proficiency examinations. 

The following distribution of courses is required for 
admission to this program. 

Humanities, 10 credits 

Social Science, 10 credits 

Natural Science, 8 credits. Although records are 
reviewed on an individual basis, college biology 
(4 credits) and chemistry (4 credits) are considered 
essential prerequisites. 

Applications 

Prospective students should write the Office of the 
Registrar, Cornell University-New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1320 York Avenue, New York, 
New York 10021, for forms to be used in making 
application for admission. 

Important Dates 

The following information and dates apply for 
applicants to both programs of the nursing major. 

Requests for applications may be made any time after 
April 1, 1972, for admission in September 1973. 

Admissions applications are due by October 1, 1972 
for early review and by January 1, 1973 for regular 
review. Applications will be released and accepted 
after January 1, if places remain to be filled. 

Early review decisions are announced by January 1. 
Decisions made by regular review are announced in 
March and April. Applications submitted after 
January 1 will be acted upon as they are completed. 

Each applicant accepted by regular review must 
advise the School of his decision regarding admission 



within 30 days of acceptance. Upon acceptance, 
early review applicants will be advised of the date 
when their decision is due. 

The Financial Assistance Application is due by 
February 1. Decisions are announced May 1. Offers 
must be accepted within 30 days of receipt. 

Visits to the School 

Members of the staff are available to meet with 
prospective applicants to discuss the School's 
admission requirements, application procedures, and 
the appropriateness of the applicant's general 
education in satisfying the requirements for admission. 
Although appointments for these visits are not 
required, prospective applicants are urged to call 
the Registrar's Office before visiting the School. 

An informational visit does not take the place of the 
required interview which is scheduled after application 
materials have been submitted. 



Academic Standing and Grades 

The Academic Standards Committee, composed of 
faculty representing the two nursing programs and 
the Dean or her representative, meets at least two 
times each year to review the academic records of 
students in the School. The Committee is responsible 
for reviewing the records of students whose suitability 
for nursing is in question, whose cumulative average 
does not meet minimal standards for promotion, 
whose cumulative average has dropped seriously 
since the previous semester, or students whose 
performance in the major nursing course is below the 
acceptable level of achievement. 

The Committee recommends to the faculty: the 
promotion of all students, and the candidates for the 
degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing. The 
Committee acts on the records of those students who 
qualify for the Dean's List (semester average of 3.25), 
and those who are to be considered for graduation 
with distinction. 

At midsemester all students who have a grade of 
D, F or U in any course will receive a notice from 
the Registrar and/or the Dean. The student is 
expected to consult with his Course Chairman and 
his advisor or the Dean. The Academic Standards 
Committee will determine whether further assistance 
or action is necessary. In addition the Committee 
will review the record of any student who is 
achieving less than 2.0 quality points in theory or U 
in clinical laboratory of the nursing course. 

At the end of the semester, any student who fails to 
achieve the cumulative average required for 
registration in good standing for the next semester 
will be subject to the scholastic action felt to be 
appropriate considering his semester record and 
past performance. However, failure to show 
satisfactory progress toward his degree, as evidenced 
by course failures or low grades in major course, 
may also be the basis for scholastic action regardless 
of the term average. A student may be placed on 






Expenses 9 



academic warning for one semester. If he has not achievement, a candidate must give evidence of 

removed the conditions of his warning at the end professional leadership potential and possess 

of the next semester he will be required to withdraw desirable personal qualifications, 
from the School. 



Final grades of S and U are given under certain 
conditions. A student who receives a semester grade 
of F, U, or an Incomplete (I) in a required course 
will be considered, on an individual basis, for 
continuation in the School. A student who receives 
an Incomplete in a course is required to complete 
the course within one year, unless it is prerequisite 
to another course. In this instance it must be 
completed before registering for the subsequent 
course. 

The faculty of the School of Nursing reserves the 
privilege of retaining only those students who in 
their judgment satisfy the requirements of 
scholarship, mental and physical health, and the 
personal attributes suitable for professional nursing. 
A student may be asked to withdraw without 
previously having been on academic warning. 

Parents and guardians do not receive regular notice 
of the student's grades. They are, however, advised 
when a student is placed on academic warning or is 
asked to withdraw from the School. 

A student is eligible for honorable withdrawal at any 
time he may elect to leave, if his academic and 
personal record meet the standards of the School, 
and if his financial record has been cleared. A student 
who plans to withdraw must report his intention to 
the Registrar and discuss, with the Dean, his reason 
for leaving. 

Minimal Cumulative Averages Required 



wester 


Program 1 and Program II 


1st 


1.6 


2nd 


1.76 


3rd 


1.82 


4th 


1.83 



The established pattern for grading is based on the 
following 4.0 scale: A (3.5-4.0); B (2.5-3.4); C (1.5- 
2.4); D (0.5-1.4); and F (0.0-0.4). 



Sigma Theta Tau 

In 1968 the School received a charter for the Alpha 
Upsilon chapter of Sigma Theta Tau, the National 
Honor Society of Nursing. The purposes of the Society 
are to recognize the achievement of scholarship of 
superior quality, to promote the development of 
leadership qualities, and to encourage creative work 
while fostering high professional ideals. Finally, it is 
hoped that the commitment of the individual to the 
ideals and purposes of professional nursing will be 
strengthened by participation in the Honor Society. 

Students who have completed one-half of the nursing 
major with a cumulative average of 3.1 or better and 
students who have completed more than one half 
of the major with 3.0 are considered for induction. 
In addition to demonstrated superior scholastic 



Degree Requirements 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing is 
granted by Cornell University. In order to qualify for 
the degree, the student must have attained the 
required minimum cumulative average for the total 
program and must have completed satisfactorily all of 
the theory and clinical laboratory courses outlined 
in this Announcement or required by decision of the 
faculty. 

In keeping with practice throughout the University, 
students in the School of Nursing may be granted the 
degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing with 
distinction. To qualify for this honor the student must 
have attained a cumulative average of 3.25 in the 
nursing major and maintained an average of "B" in 
college courses taken prior to transferring to the 
School of Nursing. 



State Registration for Graduates 

Graduates of the School are urged to take the state 
board examination for licensure which is administered 
by the Regents of the state of New York. Each 
graduate is expected to take the first examination for 
licensure which is administered after he has 
completed the Nursing program. Graduates who plan 
to work outside of New York State should determine 
whether that state has a mandatory licensure law. 
If so, the graduate is urged to establish a date of 
employment based upon his expected date of 
licensure. Satisfactory completion of this examination 
licenses the graduate of the School as a Registered 
Nurse (R.N.). The application for the examination 
is released by the Office of the Registrar during the 
final semester in which the student is registered in 
the School. 



Expenses 



The costs of attending the School of Nursing fall into 
two general categories. The first category includes 
certain fixed charges for tuition, fees, deposits, and 
related charges for services provided by the School. 
The second category includes living costs and items 
of personal expense. To help students estimate 
individual expenses the following table should be 
consulted. 



Estimated Total Expenses 

Although expenses, excluding tuition, fees, and room, 
vary for the individual students, the budget is 
estimated for those who plan to be resident students. 
Applicants and students who intend to become 
nonresident students should wrife to the Chairman, 
Financial Assistance Committee, for the commuting 
student's adjusted budget. 



10 Financial Assistance 



The following figures are for the academic year. 

Item Estimate 

Tuition $1,750 

Room 500 

Meals 900 

Books, supplies 200 

Clothing, laundry, cleaning 300 

Incidentals, recreation 300 
Transportation* 

Uniform supplies (entering students) 200 

* Transportation for clinical experience: students should 
add $100 to the budget each year. 

Fees 

Application Fee. (For applicants registered in a 
general education program.) A fee of $15 must 
accompany the application for first admission. 

Transfer Fee. (For applicants registered in a 
baccalaureate nursing program). A fee of $25 is 
charged to evaluate the record of a student already 
registered in a baccalaureate nursing program who 
wishes to apply for transfer to this School. 

Reinstatement Fee. (For students previously 
registered in this school). A fee of $10 will be 
charged to evaluate the record of a former student 
seeking to reregister in this School. 

Acceptance Fee. A nonrefundable fee of $50 must 
be paid by each person at the time he is notified 
of his tentative acceptance in the school. 

Late Registration Fee. A fee of $5 is charged to 
each late registrant. First-semester registration 
closes 5 p.m., September 1, 1972. Second-semester 
registration closes 5 p.m., Friday, February 2, 1973. 

Payment of Bills 

Bills for fixed charges are distributed approximately 
two weeks prior to each semester. The bill is due and 
payable at registration each semester, unless special 
arrangements have been made with the School. The 
amount, time, and manner of payment of tuition, 
fees, or other charges may be changed at any time 
without notice. 

Provision is made for the payment of bills during the 
registration period at the beginning of each semester. 
Financial assistance awarded by the School, except 
loans, will be applied directly to the fixed charges. No 
reimbursement of assistance offered as a grant is 
anticipated unless the student voluntarily leaves the 
School during the course of a semester. In this case, 
one-half of the amount of the grant is to be 
reimbursed. 

A student completes arrangements for a loan 
authorized by the School by signing a note and 
receiving the check during the registration period. 
The proceeds of a loan must be applied first to the 
balance due on School charges but may not be 
claimed as an exemption from the bill. 

New York State scholarships and incentive awards 
may not be claimed as an exemption from the tuition 
bill since the State prepares individual checks, which 
are payable to the student, and sends them to the 



School for distribution. Checks for these awards will 
not be available at the time tuition and fees are due. 
When an extension of time for payment of part or all 
of the tuition and fees is granted, based on a New 
York State award, it is with the understanding that 
should the State for any reason fail to prepare a check 
for the amount of the award, the student is personally 
responsible for the amount due. 

In order for a student to remain in good standing, 
receive an honorable withdrawal from the School, or 
participate in the commencement exercises, all bills 
must be paid and satisfactory arrangements made 
for the future repayment of loans. 

Students who have questions regarding their bills, 
or the payment of grants or loans after the registration 
period, should see the administrative assistant in 
NR-214 

Refunds 

Part of the tuition will be refunded to students who 
officially withdraw during the first half of the semester. 
The refund will be based on a deduction of 10 
percent per week on all charges, as of the first day 
of the semester. No refund will be made after 
the midsemester. 






Financial Assistance 

In general, students plan to meet the cost of their 
education through self-help (loans and employment). 
To the extent that is possible, parents are expected 
to contribute to the cost of a student's education. 

The Cornell University-New York Hospital School of 
Nursing participates in the College Scholarship 
Service (CSS) of the College Entrance Examination 
Board. Participants in CSS subscribe to the principle 
that the amount of financial assistance granted a 
student should be based upon financial need. The 
CSS assists colleges and universities and other 
agencies in determining the student's need for 
financial assistance. Each entering student who seeks 
financial assistance is required to submit a copy of 
the appropriate Confidential Statement form to the 
College Scholarship Service by March 1 designating 
Cornell University-New York Hospital School of 
Nursing as one of the recipients. The Confidential 
Statement should be obtained from the School of 
Nursing. 

Financial assistance is offered to students usually as a 
combination of scholarship or grant, loan, and 
employment. The scholarships and grants 
administered by the School are described below. 
These are assigned on the basis of need rather 
than academic rating. 

Loans are available from a fund established jointly 
by the School and the federal government under the 
terms of Public Law 92-158, Nurse Training Act of 
1971. No more than $2,500 may be borrowed by a 
student during an academic year. To be eligible for 
either a grant or a loan, a student must intend to be 
enrolled at least half-time and demonstrate the need 
for financial assistance. In addition, he must be 



Financial Assistance 11 



a citizen or national of the United States, or have such 
immigration status and personal plans as to justify 
the conclusion that he intends to become a permanent 
resident of the United States. 

Application for Financial Assistance 

An entering student who will need financial assistance 
should return the Financial Assistance Application 
with his application form by February 1. This will be 
forwarded to the chairman of the Financial Assistance 
Committee. The Confidential Statement should be 
filed through the College Scholarship Service by 
March 1 of the year the applicant anticipates his 
admission to the School of Nursing. 

Students enrolled in the School who expect to register 
for the next academic year and who anticipate the 
need for any form of financial assistance, should 
make appointments to see the chairman of the 
Financial Assistance Committee before December 15. 
All students receiving financial assistance will be 
seen by the chairman of the Committee during the fall 
semester to review their awards. Students who may 
or may not be receiving financial assistance and 
whose family situations change during an academic 
year, should feel free to discuss their problems 
with the chairman of the Committee. 

Financial Assistance Administered 
by the School 

Fund of the Committee for Scholarships. A fund, 
established and maintained by a committee of women 
interested in the School of Nursing, to assist young 
women who need financial help in order to prepare 
for nursing. Awards from the fund are made to 
entering students and to students enrolled in the 
School. 

Allstate Foundation Grant. A grant is made 
available to the School each year to assist a student 
throughout the program. 

The Switzer Foundation Grant. A grant of $1,500 
is made available to the School each year. This grant 
is intended to assist students who are American 
citizens living within fifty miles of New York City 
and who have financial need. 

Davison/Foreman Foundation Grant. Grants from 
this Foundation are allocated in the spring semester 
for the education of women working for a college 
degree. The awards are made to students enrolled 
in the School. 

Woman's Florist Association, Inc., Scholarship. 

Under a scholarship plan established in 1949 by the 
Women's Florist Association, Inc., a nursing student 
who has satisfactorily completed one year of the 
nursing major is eligible for a scholarship not to 
exceed the sum of $200. This scholarship is to be 
used for tuition by a student in financial need. 
Since 1959, two of these scholarships have been 
made available to the School of Nursing each year. 

Cornell Women's Club of New York. In the spring 
of the year a scholarship is made available by this 
Club for the ensuing school year. It is awarded either 



to an entering student or a student enrolled 
in the School. 

Vivian B. Allen Scholarship Fund. Established as an 
endowed fund by gifts from the Vivian B. Allen 
Foundation, Inc., income from which is used to 
provide scholarship aid annually for one or more 
students in need of financial assistance. 

Juliette E. Blohme Scholarship Fund. Established 
as an endowed fund by Dr. and Mrs. George H. 
Van Emburgh as a memorial to Juliette E. Blohme 
of the class of 1922 through a gift of $6,000, the 
interest on which may be used in whole or in 
part each year. 

Samuel J. Moritz Scholarship Fund. Established in 
1960 as a memorial to Samuel J. Moritz, and made 
possible by a gift from Edward Moritz and LeRoy 
Moses, executors of his estate. The income provides 
scholarship aid annually to one or more students in 
need of financial assistance. 

The Christian C Yegen Scholarship Fund. 

Established in the spring of 1965 as a memorial to 
Mr. Christian C. Yegen, father of an alumna of the 
Cornell University-New York Hospital School of 
Nursing. 

Emmajean Steel Fuller Fund. This fund, begun by 
the class of 1952 in memory of Emmajean Steel 
Fuller, a former member of the class, is available for 
an occasional scholarship. 

Financial Assistance Administered 
by Outside Sources 

New York State Regents Scholarships, 
Grants, and Loans 

The following scholarships are available for residents 
of New York State. The applicant should apply 
through his high school principal while he is still 
a student in high school. 

For more information on any of these, write to the 
State Education Department, State University of 
New York, Albany, New York 12224 requesting the 
leaflet Opening the Door to College Study through the 
New York State Regents Scholarship Examination. 

Regents Scholarships for Basic Professional 
Education in Nursing. Amount, $200-5500 a year 
depending upon financial need. Applicable only to 
period in the School of Nursing. 

Regents College Scholarships. Amount, $250- 
$1,000 a year depending upon financial need for a 
maximum of five years. Applicable to first two years of 
college and to period in the School of Nursing. 

Regents Scholarships in Cornell. A tuition-reducing 
scholarship ranging in amount from $100 to $1,000 
a year depending upon financial need for a maximum 
of four years. Applicable to first two years of college 
and to period in the School of Nursing. 

Regents Scholarships for Children of Deceased 
or Disabled Veterans. Amount, $450 a year for 
four years. Applicable to first two years of college and 
to period in the School of Nursing. 



Financial Assistance 13 



New York Higher Education Assistance Corporation 

sponsors a program through which students may 
obtain loans from local savings banks. 

Scholar Incentive Program. Grants of S100-S600 
yearly, depending on need and tuition paid, with 
minimum yearly grant of $100. For those students who 
demonstrate a capacity to pursue a degree and plan 
to attend college, and those who are presently in 
college and maintain satisfactory academic 
performance. 

Armed Services 

Army and Navy Nurse Corps Student Programs. 

Students in either of the basic nursing programs may 
apply for appointments in the Army Student Nurse 
Program, six to eight weeks prior to entrance to the 
School, or to the Navy Nurse Corps Candidates 
Program prior to March 1 for fall entrance. The 
student must have had receipt of acceptance to 
Cornell University-New York Hospital School of 
Nursing before the applications will be considered. 
The appointments carry generous financial allowance. 
A student who participates twelve months or less 
serves on active duty in the respective service for 
twenty-four months. If two years of support has been 
given, the student serves thirty-six months. 



General Information 
School Government 

Any student entering the school is automatically a 
member of the student organization. The functions of 
this organization are to contribute to the development 
of the professional education of the individual student 
through cooperation with fellow students and faculty; 
to represent the individual student in matters of 
student-faculty concern; to encourage in the student 
body maturity in matters of scholarship and personal 
conduct; to provide an all-inclusive organization 
through which business pertaining to the whole body 
of students may be transacted; and to foster an 
attitude of involvement in student life and development 
in the nursing program. 

Residence 

In general the School of Nursing is considered a 
resident school within the limits of its facilities. 
The Nurses' Residence has facilities for unmarried 
female students who are expected to live in unless 
a request to live out is made in writing. The request 
must be accompanied by a letter from a parent or 
guardian indicating knowledge and approval of the 
plan to live outside of the Residence. A limited 
number of rooms are available for single male 
students who may wish to live in the Residence. 
Married students are urged to assume the 
responsibility for finding living facilities in the 
metropolitan area. Married women may live in the 
Residence, as long as they comply with regulations 
for living in and pay the residence fee required of 
all female students. 

All students who live outside of the Residence must 



keep the Office of the Registrar informed of his or her 
correct address and telephone number. Each one is 
expected to maintain a mailbox in the Nurses' 
Residence, which he is responsible for checking 
once each day. The Student Handbook should be 
checked for details of rules governing students who 
live in the Residence and those who do not. The 
Student Handbook also has information regarding 
the facilities of the Residence. 

Recreational Facilities 

Because the School believes that the education of 
young men and women today includes healthful 
social relationships, provisions have been made 
for the development of such relationships in the 
life of the student. 

A social committee is responsible for a full and 
varied social calendar, which includes such activities 
as dances, skating parties, coffee hours, and suppers. 
Other activities in which students may participate 
are the yearbook and singing groups. The director 
of student relations is available at all times to advise 
students in the organization of discussion groups 
and in the planning of social and cultural activities. 

Health Services 

Good health is of the utmost importance and students 
have readily available a well-organized health service 
maintained in cooperation with the Personnel Health 
Service of The New York Hospital. 

A physical examination by a physician from the 
Personnel Health Service, a tuberculin test, and a 
chest x ray are required upon admission. 
Subsequently, the student has either a chest x ray or 
tuberculin test every six months. Elective surgery 
and dental work are not included and, if not taken 
care of before admission to the School, must be 
done during vacations. 

Students who are ambulatory, with short-term minor 
illnesses, may receive meals in their rooms in the 
Nurses' Residence on recommendation of the 
physician in Personnel Health Service. Medical 
supervision is provided through the Personnel Health 
Service. If students are more seriously ill, they are 
cared for in The New York Hospital within the limits 
of the Hospital's policy on admissions and bed usage. 
Students are required to enroll in the Associated 
Hospital Service plan available to all students in the 
Medical Center. 

If, in the opinion of the School authorities, the 
condition of a student's physical or emotional health 
makes it unwise for him to remain in the School, 
he may be required to withdraw, either temporarily 
or permanently, at any time. 

Counseling Services 

The School maintains active counseling services 
which are available to any student who needs 
assistance, either in connection with routine matters 
that may come up in his work in the School or in 
connection with special personal problems. 



14 Facilities for Instruction 



The director of student relations assists students in 
every way possible in their educational, personal, 
and social adjustment. She also cooperates with 
the faculty in helping the students in these areas and 
directs the students to those members of the staff 
who are best qualified to be of assistance in relation 
to the particular problem at hand. 

Group therapy is available to assist students whose 
effectiveness and adjustment are impaired by 
personal concerns. 



Division of Continuing Education 

The Division of Continuing Education is an organized 
educational unit of the School of Nursing under the 
administration of the Dean. 

The Division offers organized and planned 
presentations of appropriate educational experiences 
at a professional level which are university 
oriented and related to the needs and purposes of 
the employment or practice situation. The programs 
offered by the Division have their origins in selected 
areas of nursing practice. The objectives of the 
programs are directed toward enabling registered 
nurses, both in practice and returning to practice, to 
update and expand their knowledge and skills in 
circumscribed areas of clinical nursing practice. 

A variety of special workshops and formalized training 
programs are conducted cooperatively with the 
Cornell University Medical College and the 
professional staffs of The New York Hospital-Cornell 
Medical Center. 

Information on programs being offered, applications, 
and fees may be obtained by writing to: Division of 
Continuing Education, 1320 York Avenue, Room NR 
340, New York, New York 10021. 



Facilities for Instruction 

The facilities of The New York Hospital-Cornell 
Medical Center provide the setting for a considerable 
portion of the learning experiences offered to students 
in the School of Nursing. These include classrooms, 
laboratories, clinical services, and libraries, set in 
an environment which promotes a spirit of inquiry. 
Additional learning experiences are provided 
through observations and practice in community and 
other health service agencies. 



Clinical Facilities 

The clinical facilities of The New York Hospital 
provide unusual opportunity for the care and study 
of patients. The New York Hospital comprises five 
clinical departments, largely self-contained. Each 
of these is provided not only with facilities adequate 
in every way for the care of both inpatients and 
outpatients, but also with facilities for teaching and 
the conducting of research. Many specialized clinical 
services which are seldom found within a single 
organization are, therefore, available. The Hospital 
has 1,100 beds and 90 clinics. Approximately 



34,000 patients are hospitalized and 50,000 treated 
as outpatients each year. The conduct of research 
in all clinical departments gives the student an 
opportunity to become increasingly aware of the part 
which the nurse must be prepared to play in 
research projects. Authenticity of the findings in 
many studies depends to no small degree on the 
accuracy with which the nurse carries out tests and 
procedures and observes and records reactions. 

The Medical and Surgical Departments include, 
in addition to general medicine and general surgery, 
pavilions devoted to the specialties of neurology 
and metabolism; urology; ear, nose, and throat 
disorders; plastic- and neurosurgery; and 
ophthalmology. The Lying-in Hospital has a capacity 
of 163 adults and 77 newborns and provides for 
obstetric and gynecologic patients. Each year, nearly 
4,000 babies are born in this Hospital. Since this 
Center was found in 1932, over 100,000 babies have 
been born here. 

The Department of Pediatrics includes 117 beds, 
with five floors for the care of infants, older children, 
and premature babies. Facilities for the recreation 
of convalescent children and the services of an 
occupational therapist offer opportunities for the 
student to study the development and guidance of 
convalescent as well as sick children. 

The Payne Whitney Clinic for psychiatric care has a 
bed capacity of 108 patients, admitted from all 
socioeconomic groups and from all over the world. 
It is an intensive treatment center for psychotherapy, 
and its staff and resources are unusual. The student, 
therefore, has an opportunity to participate in the 
care of patients with a variety of mental health 
problems. 

The Outpatient Department with its ninety clinics 
provides opportunity for the study of a large number 
of patients who come for general health supervision, 
for diagnosis of disease, and for treatment of disease 
that can be conducted on an ambulatory basis. 
Each year more than 230,000 patient visits are made 
to this Department. Arrangements for continuity of 
care through use of referrals to public health nursing 
agencies are an essential part of all experiences. 
Opportunity is provided for participation in the 
teaching of expectant parents through special classes 
and individual conferences and for study of the 
family approach to health maintenance and care 
of children. 

Public health nursing field experience is provided 
in the following agencies: the Visiting Nurse Service 
of New York, the Visiting Nurse Association of 
Brooklyn, and the Bureau of Public Health Nursing, 
New York City Health Department. These agencies 
provide opportunity for the student to learn the 
application of public health principles in both 
voluntary and official agencies. 

Representatives of various governmental, voluntary, 
and coordinating agencies plan, with the faculty, for 
appropriate ways to contribute to the student's 
knowledge of the community and it's organization 
for human services. 






Facilities for Instruction 15 



The Library 

The library, in the Samuel J. Wood Library and 
Research Building, is shared by the students and the 
faculties of the School of Nursing and the Medical 
College, and the staff of The New York Hospital. 

The reading room of the library is located on the first 
floor. Adjoining the reading room are the sections for 
current journals, reference works and monographs. 
The book stacks and carrels are on two floors below 
the main reading room. Sixteen hundred current 
journals are received each year; the total collection 
has reached more than 100,000 volumes. 

The library is also equipped with a communication 
terminal linked to a computer to provide searches 
of the medical literature. The information and 



reference department receives requests for these 
searches. Typing and duplicating services and, most 
importantly, a staff willing to help are also available. 

The clinical nursing departments have small libraries 
containing literature pertaining especially to the 
subject matter of the department. These collections, 
interlibrary loans, and photoduplicate copies from 
other libraries, including the National Library of 
Medicine, supplement the main library. 

The library is open during the week from 8:15 a.m. 
until 11 p.m., on Saturdays from 9:00 a.m. until 
5 p.m. and on Sundays from 1:00 p.m. to 11 p.m. 
The library is closed on the following holidays: New 
Year's, Memorial Day, July 4th, Labor Day, 
Thanksgiving, and Christmas. 



Description of Courses 



Nursing Courses 



153-156 Introduction to the Nursing Process, Care of 
the Adult Patient. Fall. Credit five hours theory, five 
hours clinical laboratory. Miss Bielski and faculty. 
The course is composed of two units. The first is 
concerned with learning and practicing nursing skills 
basic to providing nursing care. In the second unit the 
nursing process will be introduced and applied to the care 
of adult patients with representative medical-surgical 
health problems. Pharmacology, nutrition, and diet therapy 
are integrated throughout the course. The clinical 
laboratory will be utilized to apply concepts and skills 
in caring for patients with these and other 
health problems. 

154-157 Maternal-Child Nursing. Fall and Spring. 
Prerequisite: Nursing 153-156. Credit five hours theory, 
five hours clinical laboratory. Mrs. Natapoff and faculty. 
Registration for this course is by advisement. 
Emphasis is placed on the study of the health needs of 
childbearing women, their children, and families. Family 
influences, social trends and normal development are 
integrated throughout the semester. The concept of 
nurturance for the promotion of optimum health provides 
the framework for nursing intervention. Experiences are 
provided in teaching principles of health maintenance to 
families in a variety of settings. 

155 Nursing for the Activation of Potential. Fall and 

Spring. Prerequisite: Nursing 153. Credit six hours theory, 
five hours clinical laboratory. Miss Hansen and faculty. 
Registration for this course is by advisement. 
This course deals with learning the concepts and skills 
needed to intervene therapeutically with adults who have 
psychological and/or physiological dysfunctions. The 
major emphasis during this course is placed on utilization 
of the nurse-patient relationship. Studies are made of the 
similarities and dissimilarities of nursing techniques in 
the care of adult patients with long-term illness who are in 
institutional and home settings, as compared with the 
care of patients with acute psychological dysfunction 
who are in a psychiatric setting. 

160 Interpersonal Processes in Nursing. Fall 
Prerequisite: Psychology, three credits; Sociology, three 
credits. Credit two hours. Mrs. Swager. 
The content of this course is prerequisite to the 
subsequent nursing courses. Elements of the nurse- 
patient relationship will be examined with emphasis on 
techniques of interviewing, therapeutic communication, 
barriers of communication, and intervention with selected 
behaviors. 



250 Transition to Nursing Practice. Spring. Prerequisite 
Nursing 153, 154, 155. Credit five hours theory, seven 
hours clinical laboratory. Miss Keith and faculty. 
Transition to Nursing Practice offers the student the 
opportunity to apply the nursing process in caring for a 
group of people with a variety of health care needs 
including some adult medical-surgical problems. Within 
these groups the student will assist individuals and/or 
families to achieve the optimal degree of health through 
the development of goals that incorporate the priorities of 
their evolving needs. 

The student will have the opportunity to learn the 
principles of leadership and apply these principles 
through active participation with health care workers in a 
variety of settings. 

256 Community Health: Care of Patients with 
Environmentally Related Health Problems. Fall 
Prerequisite: Nursing 156, 157. Credit five hours theory, 
five hours clinical laboratory. Miss Keith and faculty. 
Focus is directed toward increasing students' 
understanding of the role of the professional nurse in the 
care of individuals and families whose health problems 
necessitate a comprehensive community approach. 
Included will be the basic principles of community health 
organizations and current and future trends in health care. 
Clinical experience in community health agencies, 
extended care facilities, and psychiatric facilities will 

be provided. 

257 Dimensions of Nursing. Spring. Prerequisite 
Nursing 156, 157, 254. Credit four hours theory, eight 
hours clinical laboratory. Mrs. Herrmann and faculty. 
This course considers various aspects of professional 
nurse practice: caring for patients with acute medical- 
surgical illnesses, who have multiple and complex nursing 
needs; having responsibility for nursing care of many 
patients; and giving leadership to others participating 

in nursing care. A variety of hospital, home and 
community settings will be utilized for clinical practice. 



Biological Science Courses 

130 Biological Science. Fall. Credit four hours. Dr. 
Rubenstein. Registration for this course is by advisement 
and with permission from the instructor. 
An introductory course designed to identify fundamental 
concepts of structure and function in the human organism. 
Selected underlying anatomical and physiological 
disturbances that occur in man will be correlated with 
the clinical nursing course 153. Biochemical principles of 



18 Description of Courses 



metabolism, electrolytes and acid-base balance are 
integrated. 

131-134 Biological Science. Fall and Spring. 
Prerequisite: Biological Science 130 or 133. Credit three 
hours. Dr. Rubenstein. This course is offered concurrent 
to Nursing 154-157. 

The reproductive cycle in man will be studied. Principles 
of heredity, general embryology, and medical genetics 
will be covered. There will be a survey of the 
microorganisms detrimental to man, designed to acquaint 
the student with communicable diseases that are endemic 
to society. Principles of immunity will be included. The 
correlation between disease patterns and social climate 
will be identified. 

132-136 Biological Science. Fall and Spring. 
Prerequisite: Biological Science 130 or 133. Credit three 
hours. Mrs. Stolar. This course is offered concurrent to 
Nursing 155 and Nursing 256. 

Morphological and functional study of the nervous system 
in man with special reference to interference of normal 
pathways. Neurone physiology, neuroanatomy, receptor 
physiology, neural pathways as a basis for integrative 
activity and neuromuscular relationships are included. 
Degenerative processes in basic tissues will also be 
explored. Selected disturbances that occur in man will be 
correlated with clinical nursing. 

133 Biological Science. Fall. Credit three hours. 
Mrs. Stolar. Registration for this course is by advisement 
and with permission from the instructor. 
An introduction to the properties and physiological 
processes common to all animals. Photoplasmic 
organization, membrane characteristics, energetics, control 
systems, and cell division will be covered. The 
cardio-vascular-pulmonary and gastrointestinal systems 
will be studied. Emphasis will be placed on interference of 
normal function, mechanisms of compensation, tissue 
change, and sequelae. Hormones will be surveyed to 
understand their control of biological processes. 



Social Science and Related Courses 

107 Human Behavioral Development. Fall and Spring. 
Credit two hours. Dr. Salk. This course is offered 
concurrent to Nursing 154-157. 

The interaction of physiological, genetic, and environmental 
factors in conjunction with developmental stages will be 



presented in studying human behavioral development, 
with emphasis on the development of psychopathology. 
This will include all stages in development from early 
infancy through old age. Specific emphasis will be placed 
on child-rearing practices. Patients will be presented to 
demonstrate interviewing techniques and the child's 
emotional response to hospitalization. 

108 Introduction to Research. Spring. Credit three 
hours. Miss Chapman. 

The student is introduced to the basic skills needed for the 
evaluation of research material: critical thinking about 
situational and written data pertinent to nursing; and 
recognition of appropriate use of common statistical 
concepts. 

109 Theories of Human Growth and Development. 

Fall (not offered in 1972) and Spring. Credit two hours. 
Faculty to be appointed. 

The course is taught in four units. Each unit considers 
the work of one or more major theorists; i.e., cogniture, 
Praget; physiological, Gisell; psychological, Freud 
and Erickson; social, Sullivan. 

207 Nursing in the Social Order. Spring. Credit two 
hours. Dr. Lambertsen. 

The structure and function of both formal and informal 
social organizations are considered, especially as they 
influence the work of the professional nurse in the 
delivery of health services. 

246 Public Health. Fall and Spring. Credit two hours. 
Miss Hansen. This course is offered concurrent to 
Nursing 155. 

A study of community health needs and designs for 
meeting these needs. Programs and organizations 
participating in the formal and informal community health 
structure will be examined using an epidemiologic 
framework. 

Guided Study. This course offers to qualified students 
the opportunity for guided study and course visitation 
under the direction of a faculty member. The course 
permits participation in classes, seminars, conferences, 
library research and selected nursing service programs. 
The course is offered within the regular term date. No 
credit or grade is given but a record of achievement is 
filed in the student record. A special fee is established 
after consultation with the Dean's office. Request for 
attendance is filed in the Registrar's office and referred 
to the Dean. 



Register 



Administration 
Cornell University 

Dale R. Corson, President of the University 
Robert A. Plane, University Provost 
W. Donald Cooke, Vice President for Research 
Lewis H. Durland, University Treasurer 
William D. Gurowitz, Vice President for Campus Affairs 
Samuel A. Lawrence, Vice President for Administration 
E. Hugh Luckey, Vice President for Medical Affairs 
Thomas W. Mackesey, Vice President for Planning 
Paul L. McKeegan, Vice Provost 
Arthur H. Peterson, University Controller 
Richard M. Ramin, Vice President for Public Affairs 
Robert F. Risley, Vice Provost 
Neal R. Stamp, Secretary of the Corporation and 
University Counsel 



Member at Large 

Walter B. Wriston 

Ex Officio Member 

E. Hugh Luckey, M.D. 

Officers of the School 

Dale R. Corson, Ph.D., President of the University 
Robert A. Plane, Ph.D., Provost of the University 
Eleanor C. Lambertsen, Ed.D., D.Sc. (Hon.), R.N., Dean 

of the School of Nursing and Professor of Nursing 
Louise S. Hazeltine, M.A., R.N., Associate Dean 
Nina T. Argondizzo, M.A., R.N., Assistant Dean and 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 
Florence Tritt, M.A., R.N., Assistant to the Dean 



The New York Hospital-Cornell 
Medical Center 

E. Hugh Luckey, M.D., President 

August H. Groeschel, M.D., Vice-President 

The New York Hospital 

David D. Thompson, M.D., Director 
H. Henry Bertram, Director of Personnel 
Muriel R. Carbery, Director of Nursing Service 
Susan T. Carver, M.D., Associate Director 
George J. McBride, Comptroller 
Richard J. Olds, Associate Director 
Melville A. Piatt, M.D., Associate Director 
H. Mefford Runyon, Associate Director 
Cosmo J. LaCosta, Assistant Director 

Joint Administrative Board 

Representatives from the Board of Trustees 
of Cornell University 

Dale R. Corson, President of the University, Chairman 1972 
Arthur H. Dean 
Stanton Griffis 
Robert W. Purcell 

Representatives from the Board of Governors 
of the Society of the New York Hospital 

Kenneth H. Hannan, Chairman 1973 
Stanley de J. Osborne 
Frederick K. Trask, Jr. 
John Hay Whitney 



Faculty and Staff 
Administration 



Eleanor C. Lambertsen, Ed.D., D.Sc. (Hon.), R.N., 

Dean of the School of Nursing and Professor of Nursing 

Louise S. Hazeltine, M.A., R.N., Associate Dean 

Nina T. Argondizzo, M.A., R.N., Assistant Dean and 
Assistant Professor of Nursing 

Florence Tritt, M.A., R.N., Assistant to the Dean 

Edna Johnson, Director of Student Relations 

Meimi Joki, A.B., Administrative Assistant 

Toni J. Marzano, Administrative Assistant 



Undergraduate Faculty 



Eddie Mae Barnes, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Nursing; 

Director of Nursing, Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic 
Helen M. Berg, M.Ed., R.N., Associate Professor of 

Nursing and Department Head of Medical Nursing 
Mary T. Bielski, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of Nursing 
Marie Boguslawski, M.S.N., R.N., Assistant 

Professor of Nursing 
Marion Peters Braxton, M.P.H., R.N., Assistant Professor 

of Nursing 
Muriel R. Carbery, M.S., R.N., Professor of Nursing 

and Director of Nursing Service 
Jacqueline Sue Chapman, M.S.N., R.N., Assistant 

Professor of Nursing 
Margaret Cotterell, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor 

of Nursing 
Alice DonDero, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing 

and Department Head of Pediatric Nursing 
Dorothy Ellison, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of 



20 Register 



Nursing and Department Head of Operating Room 

Nursing 
I. Darlene Erlander, M.A., R.D., Assistant Professor of 

Nutrition 
Eleanora Haas, M.S., R.N., C.N.M., Assistant Professor of 

Nursing 
Marilyn T. Hansen, M.P.H., R.N., Associate 

Professor of Nursing 
Eleanor Krohn Herrmann, M.S., R.N., Assistant Professor 

of Nursing 
Bernice Horner, M.S.N., R.N., Assistant 

Professor of Nursing 
Gladys T. Jones, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of 

Nursing 
Anne Barbara Keane, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor 

of Nursing 
Jo Ann Keith, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing 
Antonia Klimenko, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor 

of Nursing 
Katherine A. Knight, M.A., M.Ed., R.N., Assistant Professor 

of Nursing 
Patricia A. Kosten, M.Ed., R.N., Assistant Professor 

of Nursing 
Mariamma V. Kuruvilla, M.Ed., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 
Eleanor C. Lambertsen, Ed.D., D.Sc. (Hon.), R.N., 

Professor of Nursing and Dean of the School 

of Nursing 
Helen M. McDowell, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor 

of Nursing 
Marjorie A. Miller, M.S., R.N., Associate Professor 

of Nursing 
Agnes Morgan, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing 
Janet Nielson Natapoff, M.S., R.N., Assistant Professor of 

Nursing 
Janet S. Reinbrecht, M.Ed., R.N., C.N.M., 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 
Reva Scharf Rubenstein, Ph.D., Assistant 

Professor of Science 
Lois Schwager, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing 
Doris Schwartz, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of Nursing 
Cynthia Davis Sculco, M.Ed., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 
Laura L. Simms, Ed.D., R.N., Associate Professor of 

Nursing and Department Head of Surgical Nursing 
Elaine Siu, M.Ed., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 
Elizabeth D. Ivey Smith, M.A., R.N., Assistant 

Professor of Nursing 
Vera Stolar, M.S., R.N., Assistant Professor of Science 
Marie D. Strickland, M.Ed., R.N., Assistant Professor of 

Nursing and Department Head of Obstetric and 

Gynecologic Nursing 
Madeleine S. Sugimoto, M.Ed., M.A., R.N., Assistant 

Professor of Nursing 
Eleanor Taggart, M.S., R.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing 
Edna E. Tuffley, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of 

Nursing and Department Head of Private Patient 

Nursing Service 
Marcus L. Walker, M.A., M.P.H., R.N., Assistant Professor 

of Nursing 
Rita Reis Wieczorek, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of 

Nursing 
Frances J. Williams, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 
Gloria E. Wilson, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing 

Continuing Education Faculty 

Nina T. Argondizzo, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of 

Nursing and Assistant Dean 
Eddie Mae Barnes, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Nursing and 

Director of Nursing of Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic 
Mary Bartlett, M.S., R.N., Instructor 
Helen M. Berg, M.Ed., R.N., Associate Professor of Nursing 

and Department Head of Medical Nursing 
Grace E. Brown, M.A., R.N., Instructor 



Muriel R. Carbery, M.S., R.N., Professor of Nursing 

and Director of Nursing Service 
Elaine Crimmins, M.P.H., R.N., Instructor 
Virginia C. Dericks, M.A., R.N., Assistant 

Professor of Nursing 
Alice DonDero, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing 

and Department Head of Pediatric Nursing 
Dorothy Ellison, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of Nursing 

and Department Head of Operating Room Nursing 
Geraldine K. Glass, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor 

of Nursing 
Christina L. Haas, M.A., R.N., Instructor 
Helen E. King, M.A., R.N., Instructor 
Emelia Luddy, M.A., R.N., Instructor 
Jean A. S. MacMullen, M.S., R.N., Instructor 
Margery Manly, M.A., R.N., Instructor 
Grace Moroukian, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor 
Margaret J. O'Brien, M.S., M.P.H., Adjunct Assistant 

Professor 
Patricia M. O'Regan, M.A., R.N., Instructor 
Madeline Petrillo, M.Ed., R.N., Assistant Professor 
Eva M. Reese, M.A., R.N., Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Barbara Rogoz, M.S., R.N., Instructor 
Doris Schwartz, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of 

Nursing 
Laura L. Simms, Ed.D., R.N., Associate Professor of 

Nursing and Department Head of Surgical Nursing 
Marie D. Strickland, M.Ed., R.N., Assistant Professor of 

Nursing and Department Head of Obstetric and 

Gynecologic Nursing 
Edna E. Tuffley, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing 

and Department Head of Private Patient Nursing Service 
Mamie Kwoh Wang, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor 



Emeritus Professors 

Virginia M. Dunbar, M.A., R.N., Professor Emeritus of 

Nursing and Dean Emeritus 
Verda F. Hickox, M.A., R.N., Professor Emeritus of 

Nursing 
Mary Klein, M.A., R.N., Professor Emeritus of Nursing 
Margery T. Overholser, M.A., R.N., Professor Emeritus 

of Nursing 
Bessie A. R. Parker, B.S., R.N., Professor Emeritus of 

Nursing 
Veronica Lyons Roehner, M.A., R.N., Professor 

Emeritus of Nursing 
Henderika J. Rynbergen, M.S., Professor 

Emeritus of Science 
Agnes Schubert, M.S., R.N. 



Professor Emeritus of Nursing 



Class of 1973 

The name of the student is followed by his home address. 
The college or university from which he transferred is 
given in parentheses. 



Program I 

Austin, Barbara Jeanne, Massapequa, New York 

(Nassau Community College) 
Austin, Mary Marshall, Darien, Connecticut 

(Ohio Wesleyan University) 

Benedetti, Beverly Ann, Norwood, Massachusetts 

(Emmanuel College) 
Bickwit, Susan Melinda, Woodmere, New York 

(State University at New Paltz) 
Bloomfield, Lee Adele, Flushing, New York 

(New York University) 
Blundell, Kathi Lynne, Jamaica Estates, New York 

(Queens College) 



Register 21 



Browning, Cassandra Ann, Guttenberg, New Jersey 

(Engtewood Cliffs College) 
Bruno, Pamela Jane, Tenafly, New Jersey 

(Briarcliff College) 

Carson, Colleen Elaine, Demarest, New Jersey 

(Drew University) 
Castimore, Candace Ann, Augusta, New Jersey 

(Cedar Crest College) 
Chin, Agnes, New York, New York (Hunter College) 
Confino, Ann Jocalyn, Mamaroneck, New York 

(College of New Rochelle) 

Davis, Wendy Lola, Scarsdale, New York (Finch College) 
DeGroff, Ann Elizabeth, Saugerties, New York 

(Russell Sage College) 
Dodge, Gail J., Merion, Pennsylvania (American University) 
Dualsky, Martha Jane, Ardsley, New York 

(Ladycliff College) 
Durak, Jane Louise, New York, New York 

(Herbert H. Lehman College) 
Dzenkowski, Denise, East Marion, New York 

(State University at Cortland) 

Fahy, Maureen Catherine, Corona, New York 

(Marymount Manhattan College) 
Feigenbaum, Joan Merryl, Brooklyn, New York 

(Brooklyn College) 

Gabreluk, Louise R., Islip, New York (Elmira College) 
Garibaldi, Barbara Louise, Short Hills, New Jersey 

(Marymount College) 
Garvey, Lynn, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 

(Marymount College) 
Gershon, Jacqueline Sue, New Providence, New Jersey 

(New York University) 
Golden, Grace Elizabeth, Sea Cliff, New York 

(The King's College) 
Griggs, Janet Marie, Hawthorne, New York (Ithaca College) 
Groder, Joyce Ellen, Mineola, New York 

(Adelphi University) 

Haffey, Eileen Mary, White Plains, New York 

(Trinity College) 
Hagney, Catherine Ann, Massapequa, New York 

(Marymount College) 
Hale, Nancy Jean, Winthrop, Maine (Eastern Baptist 

College) 
Hall, Mary Grace, Buffalo, New York 

(State University at Buffalo) 
Halpin, Kathleen, Medford, Massachusetts 

(Marymount College) 
Harmon, Margaret T., Rockville Centre, New York 

(Marymount College) 
Hartt, Meredith Jane, Northville, Michigan 

(Michigan State University) 
Healy, Audrey Edna, Mount Kisco, New York 

(Pace College) 
Hedin, Kristina, New Canaan, Connecticut 

(Cedar Crest College) 
Hommes, Kay, Hawthorne, New Jersey (Calvin College) 

Johnston, Amy L, Broomall, Pennsylvania 

(Ursinus College) 
Jones, Averil R., New York, New York 

(Manhattan Community College) 
Jones, Margaret Allen, New York, New York 

(University of Pennsylvania) 

Kalbacher, Barbara Anne, Westfield, New Jersey 

(Elmira College) 
Kirk, Kathryn Jean, Ithaca, New York (Hood College) 
Kovanen, Marja Alakulppi, Elmhurst, New York 

(Hunter College) 
Kruger, Carroll Anne, Forest Hills, New York 

(Fordham University) 



Lanigan, Janet Marie, Maplewood, New Jersey 

(College of Mt. St. Vincent) 
Lawrence, Pamela N., Croton-on-Hudson, New York 

(Russell Sage College) 
Levine, Barbara Arlene, Oakhurst, New Jersey 

(Boston University) 
Lewis, Mary Ellen, Providence, New York 

(Case-Western Reserve) 
Lineal, Lisa Beth, Great Neck, New York 

(Drexel University) 
Linebaugh, Melodie Ann, Spring Creek, Pennsylvania 

(Houghton College) 
Littman, Judith Marsha, New Hyde Park, New York 

(Hofstra University) 
Lugo, Nadine Turpin, Brooklyn, New York 

(Manhattan Community College) 

Menden, Holly Lynn, Dover, New Jersey (Ursinus College) 
Monahan, Nancy Ann, Jersey City, New Jersey 
(St. Peter's College) 

Nulman, Beryl Ann, Lawrence, New York 
(Syracuse University) 

O'Sullivan, Mary Christine, Bronx, New York 
(Mercy College) 

Panzarine, Susan, Brooklyn, New York 

(State University at New Paltz) 
Pattarini, Barbara Lynn, Garden City, New York 

(Elmira College) 
Peters, Susan Helen, Bellerose, New York 

(St. John's University) 

Rosenstein, Louise N., Flushing, New York 

(Queens College) 
Rothberg, Ellen D., Lindenhurst, New York 

(Syracuse University) 

Safir, Kim Elizabeth, New York, New York 

(California State College) 
Schapiro, Naomi Ann, Croton-on-Hudson, New York 

(Radcliffe College) 
Schindler, Laurie Ellen, Roslyn Heights, New York 

(Cornell University) 
Schiro, Arlene G., Whitestone, New York 

(Fordham University) 
Schupp, Nancy Lee, Greenwich, Connecticut 

(Pace College) 
Scott, Audrey Dibert, Washington, D. C. (Colby Jr. College) 
Seim, Gillian Howell, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

(Kalamazoo College) 
Silberstein, Wendy-Alexandra, State Island, New York 

(Notre Dame College) 
Simandl, Jill Arlene, Calverton, New York 

(University of New Hampshire) 
Slauson, Ceil Marie, Middlesex, New Jersey 

(Douglass College) 
Staudinger, Margaret Ann, E. Brunswick, New jersey 

(Immaculata College) 
Stetch, Denise Roberts, Douglaston, New York 

(Queens College) 
Stob, Susan Jane, West Chicago, Illinois 

(Wheaton College) 
Story, Robin M., West Palm Beach, Florida 

(Cornell University) 
Straka, Bernadette G., Bronx, New York 

(Thomas More College) 

Thornburg, Catherine Marie, Seattle, Washington 

(Marymount College) 
Tracy, Kathryn Bayard, Hillside, New Jersey 

(Smith College) 

Urbanski, Lillian H., Staten Island, New York 
(Ladycliff College) 



22 Register 



Walbaum, Linda Mary, Huntington Station, New York 

(C. W. Post College) 
Wegman, Eleanor Rita, Rochester, New York 

(LeMoyne College) 
White, Kathleen Ann, New York, New York 

(College of Mount Saint Vincent) 
Wilbur, Sandra Elaine, Franklin, Maine 

(Eastern Baptist College) 
Wolpe, Mona Beth, Island Park, New York 

(Nassau Community College) 



Program II 



Bailey, Marie Elizabeth, Garden City, New York 

(Barnard College) 
Banks, Lucille Marie, New York, New York 

(Marymount Manhattan College) 
Berg, Constance Elizabeth, Massapequa Park, New York 

(Cornell University) 
Birnbaum, Stanley, Baldwin, New York (Queens College) 

Finlay, Susan Carroll, New York, New York (Colby College) 

Godfrey, Cynthia Petford, Wethersfield, Connecticut 

(Mount Holyoke College) 
Gosselin, Elizabeth Ann, Boston, Massachusetts 

(Connecticut College for Women) 
Grace, Margaret Mary, Manhasset, New York 

(University of Dayton) 
Gray, Nancy S., New York, New York 

(Sacramento State College) 

Harris, Marian Emily, Attleboro, Massachusetts 

(Emmanual College) 
Holm, Marsha Ann, Huron, South Dakota (Huron College) 

Irwin, Ann Graybill, Indianapolis, Indiana 
(Indiana University) 



Kennedy, Winifred Zierko, Brooklyn, New York 

(Fordham University) 
Kimbrough, Lydia Fitzgerald, Limestone, Maine 

(University of Kansas) 

Marcin, Sister Florence, Danville, Pennsylvania 

(Marywood College) 
Menden, Susanne, Dover, New Jersey (New York University) 
Merritt, Jane Richardson, Bloomfield, Connecticut 

(Skidmore College) 
Murnane, Sheila Anne, Brooklyn, New York 

(Saint Joseph's College) 

O'Brien, Maureen Bernadette, New York, New York 

(Thomas More College) 
O'Regan, Sister Helen McGill, Greenwich, Connecticut 

(Manhattanville College) 
Oswald, Gregory Stephen, Long Beach, New York 

(Saint Benedict's College) 



Bridgeport, Connecticut 

Flushing, New York 
New York 



Salata, Susan Lucy, 

(Trinity College) 
Scalone, Sister M. Rose Carmel, 

(College Misericordia) 
Seligman, Nancy Joan, Merrick, 

(Cornell University) 
Shipps, Lucinda, Newington, Connecticut (Elmira College) 
Skarie, Mary Ellen, Fergus Falls, Minnesota 

(Antioch College) 
Stadler, Catherine E., Elmont, New York (Queens College) 
Steinfeld, Betty B., New York, New York (Stephens College) 

Talbot, Nancy Anne, Shoreham, New York 
(Saint John's University) 

Wasko, Joanne Marie, Spring City, Pennsylvania 
(Ursinus College) 



Index 



Academic standing, 8 

Acceptance, dates of, 8; fee, 10 

Accreditation, 6 

Administration, 19 

Admission, 7-8; general requirements, 7; 

Program II, 8 

Applications, 8; dates for filing, 8; fee, 10; 

Armed Forces programs, 13 

Army Nurse Program, 13 

Assistance, financial, 12 



Introduction to Research, 18 



Instruction facilities, 
Instructors, 19-20 



14 



Program I, 7; Joint Administration Board, 19 
request for, 25 



Bills, payment of, 10 
Biological science courses, 



8-19 



Calendar, 2 

Care of the Adult Patient, 17 

Clinical facilities, 14 

College Scholarship Service, 10 

Community Health, 17 

Continuing Education, Division of, 14; application, 14; 

fee, 14 

Cornell Medical Center, 5; Joint Board, 19 

Cornell University, 5; administration, 19 

Counseling services, 12 

Courses, plan for Program I, 7; plan for Program II 

7-8; course descriptions, 18-19 

Dean's List, criteria for, 8 

Degree, requirements, 9; with distinction, 9 

Department of Health, 14 

Dimensions of Nursing, 17 

Dismissal, 8-9 

Expenses, 9 

Facilities, clinical, 14; for instruction, 14; recreational, 13; 
residence, 13 

Faculty, administration, 19; continuing education, 20; un- 
dergraduate, 19-20 
Fees, 10 

Financial assistance, 10-13; application for, 11; dates for 
administering, 8 
Foundations of Nursing, 17 

Government, School, 13 
Grades, 8. 9 
Grants, 10-12 
Guided Study, 18 

Health services, 13 

History of School, 5 

Honor Society, 9 

Human Behavioral Development, 18 

Human Growth and Development, Theories of, 18 

Information, request for, 25; visit for, 8 
Interpersonal Processes in Nursing, 17 
Introduction to Nursing, 17 



Library, 15 
Living out, 
Loans, 10, 



19; facilities for 



Male students, 13 
Married students, 13 
Maternal-Child Nursing, 17 

Navy Nurse Program, 13 

New York Hospital, 5; administration, 

instruction, 14 

Nursing courses, 17 

Nursing for Activation of Potential, 17 

Nursing in the Social Order, 18 

Nursing major, 6 



Objectives, 6 

Philosophy, 6 

Professors, 19-20; assistant, 19-20; associate, 19-20; 

emeritus, 20 

Program I, 6, 7 

Program II, 6, 7, 8 

Public Health, course, 18 



Recreational facilities, 13 

Refunds, 10 

Regents awards, 11, 13 

Register, 19 

Registration, late, 10; state, 9 

Reinstatement Fee, 10 

Requirements, general, 7-8; Degree, 

Research, Introduction to, 18 

Residence, 13; male students, 13; 

single women, 13 



married students, 13; 



Scholar Incentive Program, 10, 11 

Scholarships, 1 1 

Sigma Theta Tau, 9 

Social Order, Nursing in the, 18 

Social science courses, 18 

Students, 20-22 

Transfer fee, 10 

Transition to Nursing Practice, 17 

Tuition, 10 

Undergraduate Program, 6 

Visiting Nurse, 14 
Visits to the School, 8 

Withdrawal, 9; refund for, 10 



Further Information and Application 
Undergraduate Program 

It is important that persons interested in 
pursuing one of the programs at the School of 
Nursing make plans well in advance so that their 
college programs may be arranged to provide 
the necessary background. 

To receive assistance in such planning, an 
interested student should fill out the form 
on this page and send it to 

Registrar 

Cornell University-New York Hospital School of 

Nursing 
1320 York Avenue 
New York, New York 10021. 

(The writer should include his zip code.) 



Request Form 



□ I wish to receive further information. Please 
place my name on your mailing list. 

□ I wish to apply for admission in September 



year 

Please send me an application blank for 

□ Program I (after two years of college) 

□ Program II (after four years of college) 



street address 



city 



state 



zip 



date of birth 



name of high school 



address 



date diploma received or expected 



name of college 



address 



List of Announcements 

Following is a list of Announcements published by 
Cornell University to provide information on programs, 
faculty, facilities, curricula, and courses of the 
various academic units. 

New York State College of 

Agriculture and Life Sciences 
College of Architecture, Art, and Planning 
College of Arts and Sciences 
Department of Asian Studies 
Graduate School of Business and 

Public Administration 
Field of Education (Graduate) 
College of Engineering 
Engineering at Cornell 

Graduate Study in Engineering and Applied Sciences 
General Information* 
Graduate School 

Graduate School: Course Descriptions 
School of Hotel Administration 
New York State College of Human Ecology 
New York State School of 

Industrial and Labor Relations 
Law School 

Medical College (New York City) 
Graduate School of Medical Sciences 

(New York City) 
Cornell University-New York Hospital School of 

Nursing (New York City) 
Graduate School of Nutrition 
Officer Education (ROTC) 
Summer Session 
Veterinary College 

* The Announcement of General Information is de- 
signed to give prospective students pertinent infor- 
mation about all aspects and academic units of the 
University. 

Requests for the publications listed above 
should be addressed to 

CORNELL UNIVERSITY ANNOUNCEMENTS 
Edmund Ezra Day Hall 
Ithaca, New York 14850. 

(The writer should include his zip code.) 









Cornell University 
H Announcements 

Cornell University- 
New York Hospital 
School of Nursing 



Cornell University 



Cornell University- 
New York Hospital 
School of Nursing 
1320 York Avenue 
New York, New York 10021 

1973-74 



Cornell University Announcements 

Volume 65 of the Cornell University 
Announcements consists of twenty-one 
catalogs, of which this is number 11, dated 
July 27, 1973. Publication dates: twenty-one 
times a year (four times in August; three times 
in March and July; twice in January, June, 
and October; once in April, May, September, 
November, and December). Publisher: 
Cornell University, Sheldon Court, 
420 College Avenue, Ithaca, New York 14850. 
Second-class postage paid at Ithaca, New York. 



1973-74 



Academic Calendar 



Orientation, entering class, begins 9:00 a.m. 

Orientation, entering class, ends 5:00 p.m. 

Registration 

Labor Day holiday 

Fall term instruction begins, all classes 8:00 a.m. 

Opening convocation, 4:00 p.m. 

School holiday 

Midsemester grades due, 5:00 p.m. (Class of 
1974) 

Progress grades due, 5:00 p.m. (Class of 1975) 

Instruction suspended, 1:00 p.m. 

Thanksgiving recess 

Instruction resumed, 7:30 a.m. 

Fall term instruction ends, 5:00 p.m. 

Study period 

Final examinations and clinical evaluation 
begin, 9:00 a.m. 

Final examinations and clinical evaluation 
end, 5:00 p.m. 

Christmas recess and intersession 

Registration, new and rejoining students 

Registration, continuing students 

Spring term instruction, all classes, 
begins 9:00 a.m. 

Spring recess 

Instruction resumed, 7:30 a.m. 

Midsemester grades due, 5:00 p.m. 



Wednesday, August 29 
Thursday, August 30 
Friday, August 31 
Monday, September 3 
Tuesday, September 4 
Thursday, September 13 
Monday, October 8 

Friday, October 26 
Friday, November 16 
Wednesday, November 21 

Monday, November 26 
Monday, December 17 
Tuesday, December 18 

Wednesday, December 19 

Friday, December 21 

Thursday, January 31 
Friday, February 1 

Monday, February 4 
Saturday, March 23 
Monday, April 1 
Wednesday, April 3 



Spring term instruction ends, 5:00 p.m. 
(Class of 1974) 

Study period (Class of 1974) 

Final examinations and clinical evaluation 
begin, 9:00 a.m. (Class of 1974) 

Spring term instruction ends, 5:00 p.m. 
(Class of 1975) 

Final examinations and clinical evaluation 
end, 5:00 p.m. (Class of 1974) 

Study period (Class of 1975) 

Final examinations and clinical evaluation 
begin, 9:00 a.m. (Class of 1975) 

Final examinations and clinical evaluation 
end, 5:00 p.m. (Class of 1975) 

Memorial Day holiday 

Convocation and Commencement 



Tuesday, May 14 
Wednesday, May 15 

Thursday, May 16 

Friday, May 17 

Monday, May 20 

Monday, May 20 & 
Tuesday, May 21 

Wednesday, May 22 

Friday, May 24 
Monday, May 27 
Wednesday, May 29 



The dates shown in the Academic Calendar are 
subject to change at any time by official 
action of Cornell University. 

In enacting this calendar, the University Senate 
has scheduled classes on religious holidays. 
It is the intent of Senate legislation that 
students missing classes due to the observance 
of religious holidays be given ample opportunity 
to make up work. 




is .a * 



Announcements 



Contents 



2 Academic Calendar 

7 History of the School 

8 Accreditation 

8 The Undergraduate Program 

10 Admission 

12 Academic Standing 

14 State Registration 

14 Expenses 

15 Financial Assistance 

18 General Information 

19 Division of Continuing Education 
19 Facilities for Instruction 

21 Description of Courses 

23 Register 

28 Index 

29 Application 

31 List of Announcements 



The courses and curricula described in this 
Announcement, and the teaching personnel 
listed herein, are subject to change at any time 
by official action of Cornell University. 



m * ' •"" 



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CORNELL UNIVERSITY- 
NEW YORK HOSPITAL 
SCHOOL OF NURSING 




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Cornell University 



Cornell University — New York Hospital 
School of Nursing 



History of the School 



The Cornell University-New York Hospital School 
of Nursing was established as a school in 
Cornell University in 1942, on the sixty-fifth 
anniversary of the founding of The New York 
Hospital School of Nursing. One of the earliest 
nursing schools in the country, the School is 
part of the New York Hospital-Cornell Medical 
Center, which includes also the Cornell 
University Medical College and the various 
buildings of The New York Hospital extending 
from Sixty-eighth to Seventy-first Streets on 
the East River. 

The Center is a joint undertaking of The Society 
of the New York Hospital and Cornell 
University, and is committed to a fourfold 
purpose including: (1) care of the sick, pro- 
viding the same wisdom and skill to rich and 
poor; (2) education of doctors and nurses, 
research workers, technicians, and others who 
will work in the field of medical science; (3) 
research to extend the boundaries of knowledge 
in the health fields; and (4) the promotion of 
public health through the development of 
preventive medicine. 

The New York Hospital is the second-oldest 
voluntary hospital in this country — its Royal 
Charter having been granted in 1771 in the 
reign of King George III. The first patients were 
soldiers wounded in the Revolutionary War. 
At that time the Hospital was located on the 
lower end of Manhattan, the only part of the city 
then settled. On early maps the location was 
designated simply as "the Hospital." 

Cornell University, with its campus in Ithaca, 
New York, received its charter in 1865. Three 
circumstances contributed to the founding of the 
University in the eventful years that marked 
the close of the Civil War. In the first place, 
Ezra Cornell, a citizen of Ithaca, had come into 
a large fortune from his holdings in the newly 
formed Western Union Telegraph Company 
and had devoted much thought to the good that 
might be done by giving his wealth to education. 
A second circumstance was the fact that the 



state of New York had received a substantial 
land grant, under the Morrill Act of 1862, for the 
support of colleges teaching agriculture and 
the mechanical arts. The third circumstance was 
that Mr. Cornell had as a colleague in the 
state legislature of 1864-65, a young senator 
named Andrew D. White — later to become the 
first president of the University — who had the 
vision of preserving the state's land grant intact 
for a single great institution which should 
teach not only agriculture and the mechanical 
arts but the humanities and the sciences as well. 
The Medical College, the School of Nursing, 
and the Graduate School of Medical Sciences 
are the divisions of the University which are 
located in New York City. 

The Hospital had been operating for over one 
hundred years before a school for the training of 
nurses was opened. Early steps had been 
taken, however, to improve the care given to 
patients. In 1799 Dr. Valentine Seamen, a 
scholar and prominent physician, had organized 
a series of lectures, combined with a course of 
practical instruction in the wards, for the 
women whom the Hospital had engaged as 
"watchers" and "nurses." Although the 
theoretical content was meager and the practical 
instruction not systematically planned, these 
classes focused attention on the fact that 
women who had some preparation for their 
work gave better care than those without 
instruction. When, in 1873, the first training 
school in this country on the Nightingale pattern 
was opened in Bellevue Hospital, the Governors 
of The Society of the New York Hospital 
contributed to its support. Four years later, in 
1877, when the Hospital moved to new buildings, 
The New York Hospital Training School for 
Nurses was opened in quarters which were 
considered to have all the modern improvements 
of the times. The School moved to the present 
location when the Medical Center was 
opened in 1932. 

The health needs of the community and country 
have been the guiding force in the development 
of the School, which has modified its program 



8 The Undergraduate Program 



to keep pace with these needs. Today, the work 
of the professional nurse requires much more 
self-direction and leadership ability than in the 
past, and, in recognition of this, the University 
program was established in 1942. Since 
1946, all students admitted to the School have 
been candidates for the degree of Bachelor 
of Science in Nursing. 

The Division of Continuing Education was 
organized as an educational unit of the School 
of Nursing in 1971. Although it is a non-degree 
granting division of the school, it has the same 
status within the structure as the organizational 
unit for undergraduate programs leading 
to a degree. 

The Cornell University-New York Hospital 
School of Nursing Alumnae Association, 
originally the Alumnae Association of The New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, was organized 
in 1893. It was one of the ten alumnae associa- 
tions which helped to bring about the national 
professional organization of nurses, now known 
as the American Nurses' Association. In 1945 
the Alumnae Association became a part of the 
Cornell University Alumni Association. 

Accreditation 

The School is accredited by the Department of 
Baccalaureate and Higher Degree Programs 
of the National League for Nursing as a generic 
college program leading to a baccalaureate 
degree. 

The School is registered by the State Education 
Department, Division of Professional Education 
of the University of the State of New York. 

The Undergraduate Program 

The School accepts its responsibility for the 
preparation of a professional nurse by offering 
a curriculum based on the following philosophy 
and objectives. 

Philosophy 

Education is a process which helps the 
individual to develop his potential so that he 
may function productively within existing and 
changing social systems. This is a dynamic 
process involving the active participation of the 
student and the teacher. The school provides 
the environment in which the student can test 
his abilities and evaluate his progress. 

The major purposes of the general education 

courses preceding the nursing major are: 
to instill knowledge; to cultivate intellectual 
skills; and to nurture the traits of personality and 
character basic to a reasoned and responsible 
life. Because of the foundation provided by these 
courses, it is anticipated that the student will 
be prepared to better understand himself, his 



social and physical environment, and the role of 
the professional nurse in society. 

Professional nurses assume responsibility for 
maintaining optimum standards for the planning, 
evaluation, and the delivery of nursing care in a 
variety of settings. They also function as 
members of the interdisciplinary health team 
in the planning, evaluation, and delivery of 
health care. They recognize the need to speak 
on both community and professional issues 
which are within their field of competence or 
interest and to assist in promoting public 
involvement in health by defining and clarifying 
health issues. As professional people they 
recognize the need to continue to develop 
personal and professional competence through 
the formal and informal educational structures 
which are best suited to their needs and abilities. 

Objectives 

Upon completion of the program, the graduate 
functions as a beginning-level professional 
nurse practitioner in a variety of settings. 

The graduate will: (1) use the intellectual skills 
of observation, assessment, planning, and 
evaluation to establish and implement nursing 
goals; (2) understand how man functions in 
relationship to himself and others in health and 
sickness; (3) apply principles of leadership in 
directing nursing care of patients; (4) function as 
a colleague with members of an interdisciplinary 
team; (5) possess a foundation for continuing 
professional development in nursing; (6) main- 
tain the standards of nursing services through 
constant assessment of existing practices and 
through participation in professional and 
community organizations; and (7) recognize the 
structures of a variety of health care systems 
and the effect which the structure has on the 
nature of nursing practice. 

The Nursing Major 

The nursing major, consisting of four semesters 
of full-time study, is offered in two programs 
identified as Program I and Program II. Both 
programs are based upon the philosophy that 
general education courses provide the foundation 
for the professional courses of the nursing 
major. In keeping with this philosophy, course 
requirements in the humanities, social sciences, 
and natural sciences have been identified as 
prerequisites for both programs. Sixty general 
education credits are required for admission to 
Program I. In addition to presenting the 
required prerequisites for the nursing major, 
students who enroll in Program II are required 
to hold a baccalaureate degree in another 
discipline before admission to the professional 
program. Both programs lead to the degree 
of Bachelor of Science in Nursing. 

The programs are planned so that the student 
moves from less-complex situations in the care 



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10 Admission 



of individuals and families, to those situations 
which test his ability to provide leadership in the 
delivery of health services. Initially attention 
is focused on the acquisition of nursing skills 
and the role of the professional nurse in 
the care of adult patients. 

In the courses of the second and third semester, 
the student studies the patient in the hospital, 
the home, and the community. The content 
of one semester deals with the family in which 
child bearing women, their children, and their 
families, provide the focus for the learning 
experiences. The content and experiences 
offered in the alternate semester, provide the 
student with the opportunity to explore the needs 
of patients and families who are facing problems 
of short- and long-term physical and emotional 
illnesses. Study of the effect of the environment 
upon health and disease is correlated with 
the content of this semester. 

In the final semester the student cares for 
patients with multiple nursing needs including 
more complex medical-surgical problems. The 
student learns the principles of leadership and 
has the opportunity to apply them in 
the clinical setting. 

Courses in the biological and social sciences 
are offered concurrently with the nursing 
courses. Pharmacology, nutrition, and diet 
therapy are included in the nursing courses 
of the curriculum. 

Each student entering the school is expected to 
complete the entire program for which he is 
enrolled. To meet the objectives of the program, 
students will have clinical experiences in a 
variety of hospital and community settings. In 
order to be eligible for the degree from Cornell, 
the last year must be spent in full-time study 
in one of these programs. The faculty reserves 
the right to make changes in the curriculum 
which it believes are in keeping with the 
changing needs of society or the best interests 
of the student and the school. 

Plan of Program I (Class of 1975) 



Fourth Year 
Fall semester 
Nursing 154 
Public Health 246 
Biological Science 131 



Spring semester 
Nursing 250 
Social Science 108 
Social Science 207 



10 
2 
3 

15 

Hours 

12 

3 

2 

17 

* Registration in these courses is by advisement 
and with permission of the instructor. 

Plan of Program II (Class of 1975) 

Detailed descriptions of the courses listed below 
may be found beginning on p. 21. 

First Year 

Fall semester Hours 

Nursing 153-156 10 

Nursing 160 2 

Biological Science 133 3 



Spring semester 
Nursing 157 
Social Science 107 
Biological Science 134 



Second Year 
Fall semester 
Nursing 256 
Biological Science 136 



Spring semester 
Nursing 257 
Social Science 108 
Social Science 207 



Hours 

10 

3 

13 

12 
3 
2 

17 



Detailed descriptions of the courses listed below 

may be found beginning on p. 21. 

Third Year 

Fall semester Hours 

Nursing 153-156 10 

Nursing 160 2 

Biological Science 130* or 4 

Biological Science 133* 3 



Spring semester 
Nursing 155 
Social Science 107 
Biological Science 132 



15 or 16 



11 
2 
3 

16 



Admission 

General Requirements 

The number of qualified applicants exceeds the 
number of students that can be admitted to 
the two programs of the nursing major each 
year. Applicants selected will be those who, 
in competition with others seeking admission at 
the same time, have demonstrated by their 
qualifications that they are well fitted for the 
nursing profession. 

Evaluation of the candidate's ability to profit 
from the instruction at the School of Nursing is 
based on his secondary-school and college 



11 Admission 






records, the recommendations of school 
authorities, and the results of standardized 
achievement tests; evidence of the candidate's 
ability to make effective use of free time, and 
his capacity for leadership and concern for 
others, is given due consideration. Evaluations 
are also made on the basis of extracurricular 
activities, references, and an interview. 
Interviews are granted only to those applicants 
meeting certain minimum admission standards. 
An extensive medical report is required because 
of the nature of the professional program. 

A student already enrolled in the nursing major 
of another college or university may request 
the evaluation of his college record for possible 
transfer to the School at Cornell. 

It is the policy of Cornell University actively to 
support equality of educational opportunity. 
No student shall be denied admission to the 
University or discriminated against otherwise 
because of race, color, creed, religion, national 
origin, or sex. 

Specific Requirements for Program I 

Students who have completed a minimum of 
sixty semester hours in any university, college, 
or junior college accredited by one of the 
regional associations of colleges and secondary 
schools may apply for transfer to Program I 
of the nursing major. Applicants to this Program 
are required to take the NLN Prenursing and 
Guidance Examination. 

The following distribution of courses is to be 
used as a guideline in planning a program for 
the first two years of college. Records will be 
reviewed on an individual basis and 
adjustments made. 

Communications, 6 credits: composition, public 
speaking, or speech. 

Humanities, 20-30 credits: art, language, 
literature, music, philosophy, religion. 

Natural science and mathematics, 12 credits: 
general biology (4 credits) and general chemistry 
(4 credits) are required. Those applicants who 
did not take biology or chemistry in high school 
are required to take a year of that particular 
science in college. Based on individual 
evaluation, other college science and mathe- 
matics may be accepted in place of additional 
credits in biology and chemistry. 

Social science and history, 12-22 credits: 
sociology (3 credits required), psychology 
(3 credits required), political science, 
anthropology, economics. 

Specific Requirements for Program II 

Persons who hold or are to be awarded a 
baccalaureate degree by an accredited senior 
college or university may be considered for 
admission to this Program of the nursing major. 



Applicants will be required to take the Graduate 
Record Examination. 

The following distribution of courses is required 
for admission to Program II. 

Humanities, 10 credits. 

Social Science, 10 credits. 

Natural Science, 8 credits. Although records are 
reviewed on an individual basis, general 
biology (4 credits) and general chemistry (4 
credits) are considered essential prerequisites. 
Those applicants who did not take biology or 
chemistry in high school are required to take a 
year of that particular science in college. 

Applications 

Prospective students should write the Office of 
the Registrar, Cornell University-New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1320 York Avenue, 
New York, New York 10021, for forms to be used 
in making application for admission. 

Important Dates 

The following information and dates apply for 
applicants to both programs of the nursing 
major. 

Requests for applications may be made any 
time after May 1, 1973 for admission in 
September 1974. 

Admissions applications are due by October 1, 
1973 for early review and by January 1, 1974 
for regular review. Applications will be released 
and accepted after January 1, if places remain 
to be filled. 

Early review decisions are announced by 
January 1. Though all applicants who have 
completed their applications by October 1 will be 
interviewed in the Fall, only those meeting the 
criteria for early review will receive their 
admissions decision by January 1. In addition 
those applicants who do not qualify for the 
program will be notified once their application 
has been reviewed. Decisions made by regular 
review are announced in March and April. 
Applications submitted after January 1 will be 
acted upon as they are completed. 

Each applicant accepted by regular review must 
advise the School of his decision regarding 
admission within two weeks of acceptance. Upon 
acceptance, early review applicants will be 
advised of the date their decision is due. 

The Financial Assistance Application must be 
filed by February 1. Decisions are announced 
May 1. Offers must be accepted within three 
weeks of receipt. 

Visits to the School 

Members of the staff are available to meet with 
prospective applicants to discuss the School's 



12 Academic Standing and Grades 



admission requirements, application procedures, 
and the appropriateness of the applicant's 
general education in satisfying the requirements 
for admission. Although appointments for these 
visits are not required, prospective applicants are 
urged to call the registrar's office before 
visiting the School. 

An informational visit does not take the place 
of the required interview which is scheduled after 
application materials have been submitted 
and reviewed. 



Academic Standing and Grades 

The Academic Standards Committee, composed 
of faculty representing the two nursing programs 
and the dean or her representative, meets at 
least two times each year to review the academic 
records of students in the School. The 
Committee is responsible for reviewing the 
records of students whose suitability for nursing 
is in question, whose cumulative average does 
not meet minimal standards for promotion, 
whose cumulative average has dropped 
seriously since the previous semester, or 
students whose performance in the major nursing 
course is below the acceptable level of 
achievement. 

The Committee recommends to the faculty the 
promotion of all students and the candidates 
for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing. 
The Committee acts on the records of those 
students who qualify for the Dean's List 
(semester average of 3.25), and those who are 
to be considered for graduation with distinction. 

At midsemester all students who have a grade of 
D, F or U in any course will receive a notice 
from the registrar and/or the dean. The student 
is expected to consult with his course chairman 
and his adviser or the dean. The Academic 
Standards Committee will determine whether 
further assistance or action is necessary. In 
addition the Committee will review the record of 
any student who is achieving less than 2.0 
quality points in theory or U in clinical laboratory 
of the nursing course. 

At the end of the semester, any student who 
fails to achieve the cumulative average 
required for registration in good standing for the 
next semester will be subject to the scholastic 
action felt to be appropriate considering his 
semester record and past performance. However, 
failure to show satisfactory progress toward 
his degree, as evidenced by course failures or 
low grades in major course, may also be the 
basis for scholastic action regardless of the 
term average. A student may be placed on 
academic warning for one semester. If he has 
not removed the conditions of his warning at the 
end of the next semester he will be required 
to withdraw from the School. 

Final grades of S and U are given under certain 



conditions. A student who receives a semester 
grade of F, U or an incomplete (I) in a required 
course will be considered, on an individual 
basis, for continuation in the School. A student 
who receives an incomplete in a course is 
required to complete the course within one year, 
unless it is prerequisite to another course; in 
this instance it must be completed before 
registering for the subsequent course. 

The faculty of the School of Nursing reserves 
the privilege of retaining only those students 
who in their judgment satisfy the requirements 
of scholarship, mental and physical health, and 
the personal attributes suitable for professional 
nursing. A student may be asked to withdraw 
without previously having been on academic 
warning. 

Parents and guardians do not receive regular 
notice of the student's grades. They are, 
however, advised when a student is placed on 
academic warning or is asked to withdraw 
from the School. 

A student is eligible for honorable withdrawal at 
any time he may elect to leave, if his academic 
and personal record meet the standards of the 
School, and if his financial record has been 
cleared. A student who plans to withdraw must 
report his intention to the registrar and discuss, 
with the dean, his reason for leaving. 

Minimal Cumulative Averages Required 



Semester 


Program 1 and 




Program II 


1st 


1.6 


2nd 


1.76 


3rd 


1.82 


4th 


1.83 



The established pattern for grading is based on 
the following 4.0 scale: A (3.5-4.0); B (2.5-3.4); 
C (1.5-2.4); D (0.5-1.4); and F (0.0-0.4). 

Sigma Theta Tau 

In 1968 the School received a charter for the 
Alpha Upsilon chapter of Sigma Theta Tau, the 
National Honor Society of Nursing. The purposes 
of the Society are to rcognize the achievement 
of scholarship of superior quality, to promote 
the development of leadership qualities, and to 
encourage creative work while fostering high 
professional ideals. It is hoped that the com- 
mitment of the individual to the ideals and 
purposes of professional nursing will be 
strengthened by participation in the Honor 
Society. 

Students who have completed at least one 
half of the nursing major are considered for 
induction. Before completion of the fourth 
semester of the nursing major, an average 
somewhat higher than the national minimum of 
3.0 is required for induction into Alpha Upsilon 
chapter. In addition to demonstrated superior 



14 Expenses 



scholastic achievement, a candidate must also 
give evidence of professional leadership 
potential. 

Degree Requirements 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing is 
granted by Cornell University. In order to 
qualify for the degree, the student must have 
attained the required minimum cumulative 
average for the total program and must have 
completed satisfactorily all of the theory and 
clinical laboratory courses outlined in this 
Announcement, or required by decision 
of the faculty. 

In keeping with practice throughout the Uni- 
versity, students in the School of Nursing may be 
granted the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Nursing with Distinction. To qualify for this 
honor the student must have attained a 
cumulative average of 3.25 in the nursing major 
and maintained an average of "B" in college 
courses taken prior to transferring to the 
School of Nursing. 

State Registration for Graduates 

Graduates of the School are urged to take the 
state board examination for licensure which is 
administered by the Regents of the state of 
New York. Each graduate is expected to take the 
first examination for licensure which is 
administered after he has completed the Nursing 
program. Graduates who plan to work outside 
of New York State should determine whether the 
state has a mandatory licensure law. If so, 
the graduate is urged to establish a date of 
employment based upon his expected date of 
licensure. Satisfactory completion of this 
examination licenses the graduate of the School 
as a Registered Nurse (R.N.). The application 
for the examination is released by the Office of 
the Registrar during the final semester in 
which the student is registered in the School. 



Expenses 



The costs of attending the School of Nursing fall 
into two general categories. The first category 
includes certain fixed charges for tuition, fees, 
deposits, and related charges for services 
provided by the School. The second category 
includes living costs and items of personal 
expense. To help students estimate individual 
expenses the following table should be 
consulted. 

Estimated Total Expenses 

Although expenses, excluding tuition, fees, and 
room, vary for the individual students, the 
budget is estimated for those who plan to be 



resident students. Applicants and students who 
intend to become nonresident students should 
write to the Chairman, Financial Assistance 
Committee for the commuting student's 
adjusted budget. 

The following figures are for the academic year: 

Item Estimate 

Tuition $1,950 

Room 500 

Meals 900 

Books, supplies 250 

Clothing, laundry, cleaning 300 

Incidentals, recreation 300 
Transportation* 

Uniform supplies (entering students) 200 

* Transportation for clinical experience; students 
should add $125 to the budget each year. 

Fees 

Application Fee. (For applicants registered in 
a general education program.) A fee of $15 must 
accompany the application for first admission. 

Transfer Fee. (For applicants registered in a 
baccalaureate nursing program.) A fee of $25 is 
charged to evaluate the record of a student 
already registered in a baccalaureate nursing 
program who wishes to apply for transfer 
to this School. 

Reinstatement Fee. (For students previously 
registered in this school.) A fee of $10 will be 
charged to evaluate the record of a former 
student seeking to reregister in this School. 

Acceptance Fee. A nonrefundable fee of $50 
must be paid by each person at the time he is 
notified of his tentative acceptance in the school. 

Late Registration Fee. A fee of $5 is charged to 
each late registrant. First-semester registration 
closes 5 p.m., August 31, 1973. Second semester 
registration closes 5 p.m., Friday, February 1, 
1974. 

Payment of Bills 

Bills for fixed charges are distributed approxi- 
mately two weeks prior to each semester. The 
bill is due and payable at registration each 
semester, unless special arrangements have 
been made with the School. The amount, time, 
and manner of payment of tuition, fees, or 
other charges may be changed at any time 
without notice. 

Provision is made for the payment of bills during 
the registration period at the beginning of 
each semester. Financial assistance awarded by 
the School, except loans, will be applied directly 
to the fixed charges. No reimbursement of 
assistance offered as a grant is anticipated 
unless the student voluntarily leaves the School 



15 Financial Assistance 



during the course of a semester. In this case, 
one-half of the amount of the grant is 
to be reimbursed. 

A student completes arrangements for a loan 
authorized by the School by signing a note and 
receiving the check during the registration 
period. The proceeds of a loan must be applied 
first to the balance due on School charges 
but may not be claimed as an exemption 
from the bill. 

New York State scholarships and incentive 
awards may not be claimed as an exemption 
from the tuition bill since the State prepares 
individual checks, which are payable to the 
student, and sends them to the School for 
distribution. Checks for these awards will not be 
available at the time tuition and fees are due. 
When an extension of time for payment of part or 
all of the tuition and fees is granted, based on 
a New York State award, it is with the under- 
standing that should the state for any reason fail 
to prepare a check for the amount of the 
award, the student is personally responsible 
for the amount due. 

In order for a student to remain in good 
standing, receive an honorable withdrawal from 
the School, or participate in the commencement 
exercises, all bills must be paid and 
satisfactory arrangements made for the future 
repayment of loans. 

Students who have questions regarding their 
bills or the payment of grants or loans after the 
registration period should see the administrative 
assistant in NR-214. 

Refunds 

Part of the tuition will be refunded to students 
who officially withdraw during the first half 
of the semester. The refund will be based on a 
deduction of ten percent a week on all 
charges, as of the first day of the semester. No 
refund will be made after the midsemester. 



Financial Assistance 

In general, students plan to meet the cost of 
their education through self-help (loans and 
employment). To the extent that is possible, 
parents are expected to contribute to the cost 
of a student's education. 

The Cornell University-New York Hospital School 
of Nursing participates in the College Scholar- 
ship Service (CSS) of the College Entrance 
Examination Board. Participants in CSS 
subscribe to the principle that the amount of 
financial assistance granted a student should be 
based upon financial need. The CSS assists 
colleges and universities and other agencies in 
determining the student's need for financial 
assistance. Each entering student who seeks 
financial assistance is required to submit a copy 



of the appropriate Confidential Statement form 
to the College Scholarship Service by February 1, 
designating Cornell University-New York 
Hospital School of Nursing as one of the 
recipients. The Confidential Statement should be 
obtained from the School of Nursing. 

Financial assistance is offered to students usually 
as a combination of scholarship or grant, 
loan, and employment. The scholarships and 
grants administered by the School are 
described below. These are assigned on the 
basis of need rather than academic rating. 

Loans are available from a fund established 
jointly by the School and the federal government 
under the terms of Public Law 92-158, Nurse 
Training Act of 1971. No more than $2,500 may 
be borrowed by a student during an academic 
year. The amount of loan awarded to each 
eligible student is dependent upon the total 
amount of federal funding made available to the 
School. To be eligible for either a grant or a 
loan, a student must intend to be enrolled at 
least half-time and demonstrate the need for 
financial assistance. In addition, he must be 
a citizen or national of the United States, or 
have immigration status and personal plans to 
justify the conclusion that he intends to become 
a permanent resident of the United States. 

Application for Financial Assistance 

An entering student who will need financial 
assistance should return the Financial 
Assistance Application with his application form 
by February 1. This will be forwarded to the 
chairman of the Financial Assistance Committee. 
The Confidential Statement should be filed 
through the College Scholarship Service by 
February 1, of the year the applicant anticipates 
his admission to the School of Nursing. 

Students enrolled in the School who expect to 
register for the next academic year and who 
anticipate the need for financial assistance, 
should make appointments to see the chairman 
of the Financial Assistance Committee before 
December 15. Students receiving financial 
assistance may arrange an interview with the 
chairman of the Committee during the fall 
semester to review their awards. Those who may 
or may not be receiving financial assistance and 
whose family situations change during an 
academic year, should feel free to discuss their 
problems with the chairman of the Committee. 

Financial Assistance Administered 
by the School 

Vivian B. Allen Scholarship Fund. Established 
as an endowed fund by gifts from the Vivian B. 
Allen Foundation, Inc.; income from which is 
used to provide scholarship aid annually for one 
or more students in need of financial assistance. 




i 




17 Financial Assistance 



Allstate Foundation Grant. A grant is made 
available to the School each year to assist a 
student throughout the program. 

Juliette E. Blohme Scholarship Fund. 

Established as an endowed fund by Dr. and Mrs. 
George H. Van Emburgh as a memorial to 
Juliette E. Blohme of the class of 1922 through 
a gift of $6,000, the interest on which may be 
used in whole or in part each year. 

Fund of the Committee for Scholarships. A 

fund, established and maintained by a 
committee of women interested in the School of 
Nursing, to assist young women who need 
financial help in order to prepare for nursing. 
Awards from the fund are made to entering 
students and to students enrolled in the School. 

Cornell Women's Club of New York. In the 

spring of the year a scholarship is made avail- 
able by this Club for the ensuing school year. 
It is awarded either to an entering student or a 
student enrolled in the School. 

Davison/Foreman Foundation Grant. Grants 
from this Foundation are allocated in the spring 
semester for the education of women working 
for a college degree. The awards are made 
to students enrolled in the School. 

Emmajean Steel Fuller Fund. This fund, begun 
by the class of 1952 in memory of Emmajean 
Steel Fuller, a former member of the class, is 
available for an occasional scholarship. 

Samuel J. Moritz Scholarship Fund. 

Established in 1960 as a memorial to Samuel J. 
Moritz, and made possible by a gift from 
Edward Moritz and LeRoy Moses, executors of 
his estate. The income provides scholarship aid 
annually to one or more students in need 
of financial assistance. 

Helena Rubinstein Foundation, Inc. Grant. 

Grants from this Foundation are made available 
to the School and administered to students 
who have demonstrated need for financial 
assistance. 

The Switzer Foundation Grant. A grant of 
$1,500 is made available to the School each 
year. This grant is intended to assist students 
who are American citizens living within fifty 
miles of New York City and who have 
financial need. 

Women's Florist Association, Inc., Scholarship. 

Under a scholarship plan established in 1949 
by the Women's Florist Association, Inc., a 
nursing student who has satisfactorily completed 
one year of the nursing major is eligible for a 
scholarship not to exceed the sum of $200. 
This scholarship is to be used for tuition by a 
student in financial need. Since 1959, two of 
these scholarships have been made available to 
the School of Nursing each year. 



The Christian C. Yegen Scholarship Fund. 

Established in the spring of 1965 as a memorial 
to Mr. Christian C. Yegen, father of an alumna 
of the Cornell University-New York Hospital 
School of Nursing. 

Financial Assistance Administered 
by Outside Sources 

New York State Regents Scholarships, 
Grants, and Loans 

The following scholarships are available for 
residents of New York State. The applicant 
should apply through his high school principal 
while he is still a student in high school. 

For more information on any of these, write to the 
State Education Department, State University of 
New York, Albany, New York 12224 requesting 
the leaflet Opening the Door to College Study 
through the New York State Regents 
Scholarship Examination. 

Regents Scholarships for Basic Professional 
Education in Nursing. Amount, $200-$500 a 
year depending upon financial need; applicable 
only to the period in the School of Nursing. 

Regents College Scholarships. Amount, $250- 
$1,000 a year depending upon financial need 
for a maximum of five years; applicable to the 
first two years of college and to the period in 
the School of Nursing. 

Regents Scholarships in Cornell. A tuition- 
reducing scholarship ranging in amount from 
$100 to $1,000 a year depending upon financial 
need for a maximum of four years; applicable to 
the first two years of college and to the 
period in the School of Nursing. 

Regents Scholarships for Children of Deceased 
or Disabled Veterans. Amount, $450 a year 
for four years; applicable to the first two years 
of college and to the period in the School 
of Nursing. 

New York Higher Education Assistance 
Corporation sponsors a program through which 
students may obtain loans from local savings 
banks. 

Scholar Incentive Program. Grants of $100- 
S600 yearly, depending on need and tuition paid, 
with a minimum yearly grant of $100. For 
those students who demonstrate a capacity to 
pursue a degree and plan to attend college, and 
to those who are presently in college and 
maintain satisfactory academic performance. 

Armed Services 

Army and Navy Nurse Corps Student Programs. 

Students in either of the basic nursing programs 
may apply for appointments in the Army 
Student Nurse Program six to eight weeks prior 



18 General Information 



to entrance to the School, or to the Navy Nurse 
Corps Candidates Program prior to March 1, 
for fall entrance. The student must have had 
receipt of acceptance to Cornell University- 
New York Hospital School of Nursing before the 
applications will be considered. The appoint- 
ments carry generous financial allowance. A 
student who participates twelve months or less 
serves on active duty in the respective service for 
twenty-four months. If two years of support has 
been given, the student serves thirty-six months. 



General Information 



School Government 

Any student entering the school is automatically 
a member of the student organization. The 
functions of this organization are to contribute to 
the development of the professional education 
of the individual student through cooperation 
with fellow students and faculty; to represent the 
individual student in matters of student-faculty 
concern; to encourage in the student body 
maturity in matters of scholarship and personal 
conduct; to provide an all-inclusive organization 
through which business pertaining to the 
whole body of students may be transacted; and 
to foster an attitude of involvement in student 
life and development in the nursing program. 

Residence 

In general the School of Nursing is considered a 
resident school within the limits of its facilities. 
The Nurses' Residence has facilities for un- 
married female students who are expected to 
live in unless a request to live out is made in 
writing. The request must be accompanied by a 
letter from a parent or guardian indicating 
knowledge and approval of the plan to live 
outside of the Residence. A limited number of 
rooms are available for single male students who 
may wish to live in the Residence. Married 
students are urged to assume the responsibility 
for finding living facilities in the metropolitan 
area. Married women may live in the Residence, 
if they comply with regulations for living in, 
and pay the residence fee required of all 
female students. 

All students who live outside of the Residence 
must keep the Office of the Registrar informed 
of their correct addresses and telephone 
numbers. Each is expected to maintain a mailbox 
in the Nurses' Residence, and is responsible 
for checking it once each day. The Student 
Handbook should be consulted for details of 
rules governing students who live in the 
Residence and those who do not. The handbook 
also has information regarding the facilities 
of the Residence. 



Recreational Facilities 

Because the School believes that the education 
of young men and women today includes 
healthful social relationships, provisions have 
been made for the development of such 
relationships in the life of the student. 

A social committee is responsible for a full and 
varied social calendar which includes such 
activities as dances, skating parties, coffee 
hours, and suppers. Other activities in which 
students may participate are the yearbook and 
singing groups. The director of student relations 
is available at all times to advise students in 
the organization of discussion groups and in 
the planning of social and cultural activities. 

Health Services 

Good health is of the utmost importance for 
nursing students; to insure this a well organized 
Personnel Health Service is maintained by The 
New York Hospital. Ambulatory medical care is 
available in the Health Service and in other 
specialty outpatient clinics when necessary. 

Students are expected to complete surgery and 
dental work prior to entrance into the School. 
Otherwise elective health care must be 
scheduled during vacations. Upon registration 
in the School, a complete physical examination 
with routine tests is performed. Students' health 
is followed in the comprehensive Tuberculosis 
prevention program maintained by the 
Personnel Health Service. 

Room care service in the Nurses' Residence is 
available during minor illnesses, when recom- 
mended by the Health Service. If more seriously 
ill, a student may be admitted to The New York 
Hospital. Each student is required to enroll in 
the Associated Hospital plan available to all 
students in the Medical Center. 

If in the opinion of the Personal Health Service 
physician, the condition of a student's physical 
or emotional health makes it unwise for him 
to remain in the program, the school authorities 
may require him to withdraw either temporarily 
or permanently at any time. 

Counseling Services 

The School maintains active counseling services 
which are available to any student who needs 
assistance, either in connection with routine 
matters that may come up in his work in the 
School or in connection with special personal 
problems. 

The Director of Student Relations assists stu- 
dents in every way possible in their educational, 
personal, and social adjustment. She also 
cooperates with the faculty in helping students in 
these areas and directs students to those 
members of the staff who are best qualified to be 
of assistance in relation to the particular 
problem at hand. 



19 Facilities for Instruction 



Group therapy is also made available through 
the office of the Director of Student Relations 
to assist students whose effectiveness and 
adjustment are impaired by personal concerns. 

Division of Continuing 
Education 

The Division of Continuing Education is an 
organized educational unit of the School of 
Nursing under the administration of the dean. 

The Division offers organized and planned 
presentations of appropriate educational 
experiences at a professional level which are 
university oriented and related to the needs and 
purposes of the employment or practice 
situation. The programs offered by the Division 
have their origins in selected areas of nursing 
practice. The objectives of the programs are 
directed toward enabling registered nurses, both 
in practice and returning to practice, to update 
and expand their knowledge and skills in 
circumscribed areas of clinical nursing practice. 

A variety of special workshops and formalized 
training programs are conducted cooperatively 
with the Cornell University Medical College, 
the professional staffs of The New York 
Hospital-Cornell Medical Center, The Department 
of Health, Health Services Administration of 
the City of New York, The Visiting Nurse 
Service of New York and other cooperating 
community agencies. 

Information on programs being offered, 
applications, and fees may be obtained by 
writing to: Division of Continuing Education, 
1320 York Avenue, Room NR 340, New York, 
New York 10021. 



Facilities for Instruction 

The facilities of The New York Hospital- 
Cornell Medical Center provide the setting for 
the major part of the educational program 
offered to students in both divisions of the 
School of Nursing. The classroom and office 
facilities for the School are located at 1320 York 
Avenue, New York City. In addition to the usual 
classroom and conference room facilities there 
is an audio-visual laboratory and learning 
laboratories for the practice of basic 
nursing skills. 



The library, in the Samuel J. Wood Library and 
Research Building, is shared by the students and 
the faculties of the School of Nursing and the 
Medical College, and the staff of The New 
York Hospital. 

The reading room of the library is located on 
the first floor. Adjoining the reading room are the 
sections for current journals, reference works, 
and monographs. The book stacks and carrels 
are on two floors below the main reading room. 
Sixteen hundred current journals are received 
each year; the total collection has reached more 
than 100,000 volumes. 

The library is also equipped with a communica- 
tion terminal linked to a computer to provide 
searches of the medical literature. The Informa- 
tion and Reference Department receives 
requests for these searches. Typing and 
duplicating services and, most importantly, a 
staff willing to help are also available. 

The clinical nursing departments have small 
libraries containing literature pertaining especial- 
ly to the subject matter of the department. These 
collections, interlibrary loans, and photoduplicate 
copies from other libraries, including the 
National Library of Medicine, supplement the 
main library. 

All students have clinical experience on the 
patient units of The New York Hospital. The 
Hospital comprises five clinical departments — 
Medicine, Surgery, Lying-in Hospital, Pediatrics, 
and The Payne Whitney Clinic (psychiatry). 
Each of these units (largely self-contained) has 
facilities for inpatients and outpatients, and for 
teaching and conducting research. The 
Hospital has approximately eleven hundred 
beds and ninety clinics. 

In order to meet the objectives of the program, 
the School of Nursing contracts with selected 
voluntary and governmental agencies for 
additional clinical experiences. It is a require- 
ment of the program that each student 
participate in the care of patients in the 
community. Representatives of various govern- 
mental and voluntary agencies plan with the 
faculty for appropriate ways to contribute to the 
student's knowledge of the community and 
the organization for human services. 



Cornell University 



Description of Courses 



Nursing Courses 



153-156 Introduction to the Nursing Process, 
Care of the Adult Patient. Fall. Credit: five 
hours, theory; five hours, clinical laboratory. 
M. A. Miller and faculty. 
Composed of two units. The first unit is 
concerned with introduction of the nursing 
process, and learning and practicing nursing 
skills basic to all nursing care. During the 
second unit, the nursing process is applied to 
the care of adult patients with representative 
medical-surgical health problems. Pharmacology, 
nutrition, and diet therapy are integrated 
throughout the course. The clinical area is 
utilized to apply concepts and skills in caring for 
patients with major medical-surgical health 
problems. 

154-157 Maternal-Child Nursing. Fall and 
Spring. Prerequisite: Nursing 153-156. Credit: 
five hours, theory; five hours, clinical laboratory. 
E. W. Haas and faculty. Registration for this 
course is by advisement. 
Emphasis is placed on the study of the health 
needs of childbearing women, their children, 
and families. Family influences, social trends, 
and normal development are integrated through- 
out the semester. The concept of nurturance for 
the promotion of optimum health provides the 
framework for nursing intervention. Experiences 
are provided in teaching principles of health 
maintenance to families in a variety of settings. 

155 Nursing for the Activation of Potential. 

Fall and Spring. Prerequisite: Nursing 153. 
Credit: six hours, theory; five hours, clinical 
laboratory. B. H. Rosner and faculty. 
Registration for this course is by advisement. 
Deals with learning the concepts and skills 
needed to intervene therapeutically with adults 
who have psychological and/or physiological 
dysfunctions. The major emphasis is placed on 
utilization of the nurse-patient relationship. 
Studies are made of the similarities and dis- 
similarities of nursing techniques in the care of 



adult patients with long-term illness who are in 
institutional and home settings, as compared 
with the care of patients with acute psychological 
dysfunction who are in a psychiatric setting. 

160 Interpersonal Processes in Nursing Fall. 
Prerequisite: Psychology, three credits; 
Sociology, three credits. Credit two hours. 
L. Schwager. 

The content is prerequisite to subsequent 
nursing courses. Elements of the nurse-patient 
relationship will be examined with emphasis on 
techniques of interviewing, therapeutic com- 
munication, barriers of communication, and 
intervention with selected behaviors. 

250 Transition to Nursing Practice. Spring. 
Prerequisites: Nursing 153, 154, 155. Credit: five 
hours, theory; seven hours, clinical laboratory. 
J. A. Keith and faculty. 

Offers the student the opportunity to apply the 
nursing process in caring for a group of people 
with a variety of health care needs including 
some adult medical-surgical problems. Within 
these groups the student will assist individuals 
and/or families to achieve the optimal degree of 
health through the development of goals that 
incorporate the principles of their evolving 
needs. The student will have the opportunity 
to learn the principles of leadership and apply 
these principles through active participation 
with health care workers in a variety of settings. 

256 Community Health: Care of Patients with 
Environmentally Related Health Problems Fall. 

Prerequisites: Nursing 156, 157. Credit: five 
hours, theory; five hours, clinical laboratory. 
J. A. Keith and faculty. 
Focus is directed toward increasing students' 
understanding of the role of the professional 
nurse in the care of individuals and families 
whose health problems necessitate a compre- 
hensive community approach. Included will be 
the basic principles of community health 
organizations and current and future trends in 
health care. Clinical experience in community 
health agencies, extended care facilities, and 
psychiatric facilities will be provided. 



22 Description of Courses 



257 Dimensions of Nursing. Spring. Pre- 
requisites: Nursing 156, 157, 254. Credit: four 
hours, theory; eight hours, clinical laboratory. 
E. K. Herrmann and faculty. 
Consideration of various aspects of professional 
nurse practice: caring for patients with acute 
medical-surgical illnesses who have multiple and 
complex nursing needs; having responsibility for 
nursing care of many patients; and giving 
leadership to others participating in nursing 
care. A variety of hospital, home, and community 
settings will be utilized for clinical practice. 

Professionally Related Courses 

130 Biological Science. Fall. Credit four 
hours. R. S. Rubenstein. Registration is by 
advisement and with permission from the 
instructor. 

An introductory course designed to identify 
fundamental concepts of structure and function 
in the human organism. Selected underlying 
anatomical and physiological disturbances that 
occur in man will be correlated with the clinical 
nursing course 153. Biochemical principles of 
metabolism, electrolytes, and acid-base balance 
are integrated. 

131-134 Biological Science Fall and Spring. 
Prerequisite: Biological Science 130 or 133. 
Credit three hours. R. S. Rubenstein. Offered 
concurrent to Nursing 154-157. 
The reproductive cycle in man will be studied. 
Principles of heredity, general embryology, and 
medical genetics will be covered. There will be a 
survey of the microorganisms detrimental to 
man, designed to acquaint the student with 
communicable diseases that are endemic to 
society. Principles of immunity will be included. 
The correlation between disease patterns and 
social climate will be identified. 

132-136 Biological Science Fall and Spring. 
Prerequisite: Biological Science 130 or 133. 
Credit three hours. V. Stolar. Offered concurrent 
to Nursing 155 and Nursing 256. 
Morphological and functional study of the 
nervous system in man with special reference to 
interference of normal pathways. Neurone 
physiology, neuroanatomy, receptor physiology, 
neural pathways as a basis for integrative 
activity, and neuromuscular relationships are 
included. Degenerative processes in basic 
tissues will also be explored. Selected dis- 
turbances that occur in man will be correlated 
with clinical nursing. 

133 Biological Science Fall. Credit three 
hours. V. Stolar. Registration is by advisement 
and with permission from the instructor. 
An introduction to the properties and physio- 
logical processes common to all animals. 
Photoplasmic organization, membrane charac- 
teristics, energetics, control systems, and cell 
division will be covered. The cardio-vascular- 



pulmonary and gastrointestinal systems will be 
studied. Emphasis will be placed on interference 
of normal function, mechanisms of compensa- 
tion, tissue change, and sequelae. Hormones will 
be surveyed to understand their control of 
biological processes. 

107 Human Behavioral Development Fall and 
Spring. Credit two hours. To be appointed. 

The interaction of physiological, genetic, and 
environmental factors in conjunction with 
developmental stages will be presented in study- 
ing human behavioral development, with 
emphasis on the development of psychopathol- 
ogy. This will include all stages in development 
from early infancy through old age. Specific 
emphasis will be placed on child-rearing 
practices. Patients will be presented to 
demonstrate interviewing techniques and the 
child's emotional response to hospitalization. 

108 Introduction to Research Spring. Credit 
three hours. J. S. Chapman. 

The student is introduced to the basic skills 
needed for the evaluation of research material- 
critical thinking about situational and written 
data pertinent to nursing, and recognition of 
appropriate use of common statistical concepts. 
Each student develops a scientific proposal 
relevant to professional nursing practice. 

109 Theories of Human Growth and Develop- 
ment. Not offered 1973-74. Credit two hours. 
Faculty to be appointed. 

Taught in four units. Each unit considers the 
work of one or more major theorists; i.e., 
cogniture, Piaget; physiological, Gisell; psycho- 
logical, Freud and Erickson; social, Sullivan. 

207 Nursing in the Social Order. Spring. 

Credit two hours. E. C. Lambertsen. 

The structure and function of both formal and 

informal social organizations are considered, 

especially as they influence the work of the 

professional nurse in the delivery of health 

services. 

246 Public Health. Fall. Credit two hours. 
Faculty to be appointed. 

A study of community health needs and designs 
for meeting these needs. Programs and 
organizations participating in the formal and 
informal community health structure will be 
examined using an epidemiologic framework. 

Guided Study. This course offers to qualified 
students the opportunity for guided study and 
course visitation under the direction of a faculty 
member. It permits participation in classes, 
seminars, conferences, library research, and se- 
lected nursing service programs. Offered within 
the regular term date. No credit or grade is given 
but a record of achievement is filed in the 
student record. A special fee is established 
after consultation with the dean's office. Request 
for attendance is filed in the registrar's office 
and referred to the dean. 



Cornell University 



Register 



University Administration 

Dale R. Corson, President of the University 

Robert A. Plane, University Provost 

W. Donald Cooke, Vice President for Research 

Lewis H. Durland, University Treasurer 

William D. Gurowitz, Vice President for Campus 

Affairs 
Samuel A. Lawrence, Vice President for 

Administration 
E. Hugh Luckey, Vice President for Medical 

Affairs 
Thomas W. Mackesey, Vice President for 

Planning 
Paul L. McKeegan, Vice Provost 
Arthur H. Peterson, University Controller 
Richard M. Ramin, Vice President for Public 

Affairs 
Robert F. Risley, Vice Provost 
Neal R. Stamp, Secretary of the Corporation and 

University Counsel 

The New York Hospital — Cornell 
Medical Center Administration 

E. Hugh Luckey, M.S., President 

August H. Groeschel, M.D., Vice-President 

The New York Hospital Administration 

David D. Thompson, M.D., Director 
H. Henry Bertram, Director of Personnel 
Muriel R. Carbery, Director of Nursing Service 
Susan T. Carver, M.S., Associate Director 
John Watson, Associate Director, Financial 

Services 
Richard J. Olds, Associate Director 
Melville A. Piatt, M.D., Associate Director 
H. Medford Runyon, Associate Director 
Cosmo J. LaCosta, Assistant Director 

Joint Administrative Board 

Representatives from the Board of Trustees 
of Cornell University 

Dale R. Corson, President of the University 
Arthur H. Dean 
Robert W. Purcell 



Representatives from the Board of Governors 
of the Society of the New York Hospital 

Mr. Kenneth H. Hannan, Chairman 
Mr. Stanley de J. Osborne 
Frederick K. Trask, Jr. 
John Hay Whitney 

Members at Large 

E. Roland Harriman (as of April) 
Mr. Walter B. Wriston 

Ex Officio Member 

E. Hugh Luckey, M.D. 

Officers of the School 

Dale R. Corson, Ph.D., President of the University 
Robert A. Plane, Ph.D., Provost of the University 
Eleanor C. Lambertsen, Ed.D., D.Sc. (Hon.), R.N., 

Dean of the School of Nursing and Professor 

of Nursing 
Louise S. Hazeltine, M.A., R.N., Associate Dean 
Nina T. Argondizzo, M.A., R.N., Assistant Dean 

and Assistant Professor of Nursing 
Gloria E. Wilson, M.A., R.N., Assistant Dean and 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 



Faculty and Staff 



Administration 

Eleanor C. Lambertsen, Ed.D., D.Sc. (Hon.), R.N., 

Dean of the School of Nursing and Professor 

of Nursing 
Louise S. Hazeltine, M.A., R.N., Associate Dean 
Nina T. Argondizzo, M.A., R.N., Assistant Dean 

and Assistant Professor of Nursing 
Gloria E. Wilson, M.A., R.N., Assistant Dean and 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 
Meimi Joki, A.B., Assistant to the Dean 
Edna Johnson, Director of Student Relations 
Judith A. Court, M.A., Administrative Assistant 



24 Register 



Undergraduate Faculty 

Eddie Mae Barnes, B.S., R.N., Instructor in 

Nursing; Director of Nursing, Payne Whitney 

Psychiatric Clinic 
Helen M. Berg, M.Ed., R.N., Associate Professor 

of Nursing; Department Head of Medical 

Nursing 
Marie Boguslawski, M.S.N., R.N., Assistant 

Professor of Nursing 
Marion Peters Braxton, M.P.H., R.N., Assistant 

Professor of Nursing 
Muriel R. Carbery, M.S., R.N., Professor of 

Nursing; Director of Nursing Service 
Jacqueline Sue Chapman, M.S.N., R.N., 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 
Margaret Cotterell, M.A., R.N., Assistant 

Professor of Nursing 
Sister Catherine M. Cummings, M.S.N., R.N., 

Instructor in Nursing 
Marion Phyllis Cunningham, M.S., R.N., 

Instructor in Nursing 
Helen Demitroff, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor 

of Nursing 
Alice DonDero, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor 

of Nursing; Department Head of Pediatric 

Nursing 
Sister Mary E. Driscoll, M.A., R.N., Instructor in 

Nursing 
Dorothy Ellison, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor 

of Nursing; Department Head of Operating 

Room Nursing 
I. Darlene Erlander, M.A., R.D., Assistant 

Professor of Nutrition 
Carol Fox, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 
Ann K. Galligan, M.S., R.N., Assistant Professor 

of Nursing 
Elenora Haas, M.S., R.N., C.N.M., Assistant 

Professor of Nursing 
Eleanor Krohn Herrmann, M.S., R.N., Assistant 

Professor of Nursing 
Bonnie L. Jones, M.S., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 
Gladys T. Jones, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor 

of Nursing 
Jo Ann Keith, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of 

Nursing 
Jean C. Kijek, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 
Antonia Klimenko, M.A., R.N., Associate 

Professor of Nursing 
Katherine A. Knight, M.A., M.Ed., R.N., Assistant 

Professor of Nursing 
Patricia A. Kosten, M.Ed., R.N., Assistant 

Professor of Nursing 
Mariamma K. Mathai, M.Ed., R.N., Instructor in 

Nursing 
Eleanor C. Lambertsen, Ed.D., D.Sc. (Hon.), R.N., 

Professor of Nursing; Dean of the School of 

Nursing 
Helen M. McDowell, M.A., R.N., Assistant 

Professor Of Nursing 
Martha A. McNiff, M.A., R.N., Instructor in 

Nursing 
Marjorie A. Miller, M.S., R.N., Associate 

Professor of Nursing 
Agnes Morgan, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of 

Nursing 



Janet Nielson Natapoff, M.S., R.N., Assistant 

Professor of Nursing 
Bernice Horner-Rosner, M.S.N., R.N., Assistant 

Professor of Nursing 
Reva Scharf Rubenstein, Ph.D., Associate 

Professor of Nursing 
Lois Schwager, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor 

of Nursing 
Cynthia Davis Sculco, M.Ed., R.N., Assistant 

Professor of Nursing 
Laura L. Simms, Ed.D., R.N., Associate Professor 

of Nursing; Department Head of Surgical 

Nursing 
Elizabeth D. Ivey Smith, M.A., R.N., Assistant 

Professor of Nursing 
Vera Stolar, M.S., R.N., Assistant Professor of 

Science 
Marie D. Strickland, M.Ed., R.N., Assistant 

Professor of Nursing; Department Head of 

Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing 
Madeleine S. Sugimoto, M.Ed., M.A., R.N., 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 
Edna E. Tuffley, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor 

of Nursing; Department Head, Baker Pavilion 

Nursing Service 
Carolyn E. Wagner, M.A., R.N., Instructor in 

Nursing; Department Head of Outpatient 

Nursing 
Eloise Werlin, M.S., R.N., Research Assistant 
Rita Reis Wieczorek, M.A., R.N., Assistant 

Professor of Nursing 
Frances J. Williams, M.A., R.N., Instructor in 

Nursing 

Continuing Education Faculty 

Nina T. Argondizzo, M.A., R.N., Assistant 

Professor of Nursing; Assistant Dean 
Eddie Mae Barnes, B.S., R.N., Instructor in 

Nursing; Director of Nursing, Payne Whitney 

Psychiatric Clinic 
Mary Bartlett, M.S., R.N., Instructor 
Louise Battista, M.A., R.N., Instructor 
Helen M. Berg, M.Ed., R.N., Associate Professor 

of Nursing; Department Head of Medical 

Nursing 
Mary T. Bielski, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor 

of Nursing 
Patricia Boos, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Instruction 
Barbara Boyce, M.A., R.N., Instructor 
Grace E. Brown, M.A., R.N., Instructor 
Muriel R. Carbery, M.S., R.N., Professor of 

Nursing; Director of Nursing Service 
Beatrice A. Chase, M.A., R.N., Assistant 

Professor of Nursing 
Elaine Crimmins, M.A., R.N., Instructor 
Virginia C. Dericks, M.A., R.N., Assistant 

Professor of Nursing 
Alice DonDero, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of 

Nursing; Department Head of Pediatric 

Nursing 
Dorothy Ellison, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor 

of Nursing; Department Head of Operating 

Room Nursing 
Joanne Foster, M.A., R.N., Administrative Liaison, 

Assistant Director, Nursing Service 



25 Register 



Geraldine K. Glass, M.A., R.N., Assistant 

Professor of Nursing 
Alene Haas, M.A., R.N., Instructor 
Christina L. Haas, M.A., R.N., Instructor 
Alice Hugo, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of 

Nursing 
Helen King, M.A., R.N., Instructor 
Eleanor C. Lambertsen, Ed.D., D.Sc. (Hon.), R.N., 

Professor of Nursing; Dean of the School of 

Nursing 
Emelia Luddy, M.A., R.N., Instructor 
Margery Manly, M.A., R.N., Instructor 
Marjorie A. Miller, M.S., R.N., Associate Professor 

of Nursing 
Grace Moroukian, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor 

of Nursing 
Diana Newman, M.A., R.N., Instructor 
Margaret J. O'Brien, M.A., M.P.H., R.N., Adjunct 

Assistant Professor 
Patricia M. O'Regan, M.A., R.N., Instructor 
Madeline Petrillo, M.Ed., R.N., Assistant 

Professor of Nursing 
Eva M. Reese, M.S., R.N., Adjunct Assistant 

Professor 
Lena J. Saffioti, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of 

Nursing 
Doris Schwartz, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor 

of Nursing 
Laura L. Simms, Ed.D., R.N., Associate Professor 

of Nursing; Department Head of Surgical 

Nursing 
Marie D. Strickland, M.Ed., R.N., Assistant 

Professor of Nursing; Department Head of 

Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing 
Edna E. Tuffley, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of 

Nursing; Department Head, Baker Pavilion 

Nursing Service 
Carolyn E. Wagner, M.A., R.N., Instructor in 

Nursing; Department Head of Outpatient 

Nursing 
Mamie Kwoh Wang, M.A., R.N., Assistant 

Professor of Nursing 

Emeritus Professors 

Virginia M. Dunbar, M.A., R.N., Professor 

Emeritus of Nursing and Dean Emeritus 
Verda F. Hickox, M.A., R.N., Professor Emeritus 

of Nursing 
Mary Klein, M.A., R.N., Professor Emeritus of 

Nursing 
Margery T. Overholser, M.A., R.N., Professor 

Emeritus of Nursing 
Bessie A. R. Parker, B.S., R.N., Professor 

Emeritus of Nursing 
Veronica Lyons Roehner, M.A., R.N., Professor 

Emeritus of Nursing 
Henderika J. Rynbergen, M.S., Professor 

Emeritus of Science 
Agnes Schubert, M.S., R.N., Professor Emeritus 

of Nursing 



Class of 1974 



The name of the student is followed by his home 
address. The college or university from which 
he transferred is given in parentheses. 

Program I 

Agnew, Jacqueline, Watertown, Connecticut 
(University of New Hampshire) 

Babbitt, Susan Lucille, Houghton, New York 

(Houghton College) 
Banisch, Stefannie Lora, Maywood, New Jersey 

(Douglass College) 
Barrett, Corinne, New York, New York 

(State University at Albany) 
Bellini, Carole Anne, New York, New York 

(Fairleigh Dickinson University) 
Bos, Donna Marie, Marion, Michigan 

(Calvin College) 
Buckley, Warren Douglas, Valley Stream, New 

York (Calvin College) 
Burke, Christine P., Endicott, New York 

(Wells College) 

Catalano, Roselinn Joy, Syosset, New York 

(College of New Rochelle) 
Cincotta, Marina L., Winchester, Massachusetts 

(Cornell University) 
Clark, Cynthia Anne, Servena Park, Maryland 

(Mount Holyoke College) 
Cooper, Wendy Sue, Oceanside, New York 

(Cornell University) 
Cox, Darlene Louise, Steelton, Pennsylvania 

(Cornell University) 
Cronenberg, Susan Harriet, Fairfax, Virginia 

(University of Florida) 

Day, Mary Ann, Mt. Kisco, New York 

(Wheaton College) 
Delzio, Marilyn, Purchase, New York (Goucher 

College) 
Duffy, Joanne Patricia, Flushing, New York 

(Queensborough Community College) 
Duffy, Mary Geraldine, Bronx, New York 

(lona College) 
Dyson, Juliette Eva, Farmingdale, New York 

(Paul Smith College) 

Eckert, Margaret E., Ellenville, New York 
(Cornell University) 

Fitzpatrick, Ann Margaret, Blauvelt, New York 

(St. John's University) 
Forman, Sarah Edwards, New York, New York 

(Oberlin College) 

Gates, Karen Jane, Ithaca, New York 

(Goucher College) 
Gavin, Patricia M., Northbrook, Illinois 

(University of California) 
Gross, Robin Terry, Sayville, New York 

(Colby Jr. College) 
Groux, Mary Jo Therese, Paterson, New Jersey 

(St. Peter's College) 



26 Register 



Hann, Susan B., Marlton, New Jersey 

(Douglass College) 
Headley, Margaret Rose, Dover, New Jersey 

(Douglass College) 
Hiscock, Nancy Heller, East Hampton, New York 

(Goucher College) 
Hoogerhyde, Linda Jane, N. Haledon, New Jersey 

(William Patterson College) 
Hubbard, Eileen Clara, Brooklyn, New York 

(Edgecliffe College ) 

Jacobs, Carrie Hope, Lake Success, New York 

(Boston University) 
Jensen, Pirie Jean, Indianapolis, Indiana 

(Indiana University) 

Kaplan, Elaine Riva, Tenafly, New Jersey 

(Finch College) 
King, Karen Diane, Kettering, Ohio 

(Cornell University) 
Kurylo, Alycia Takla, New York, New York 

(Fairleigh Dickinson University) 

Lanahan, Karen Ann, Flushing, New York 

(College of New Rochelle) 
Lange, Dale A., Yonkers, New York 

(State University of Oneonta) 
Levine, Lenore, Massena, New York 

(University of Vermont) 
Linebaugh, Melodie Ann, Spring Creek, 

Pennsylvania (Houghton College) 
Loveless, Lynn Marie, Stanford, Connecticut 

(Regis College) 
Lundin, Linda Ruth, Warwick, Rhode Island 

(North Eastern University) 

McLean, Sandra Lynn, Menlo Park, California 

(Sacramento State College) 
Maroney, Maureen, Lynbrook, New York 

(St. John's University) 
Meade, Elizabeth M., Jackson Heights, New York 

(St. John's University) 
Merman, Robin Gene, Bayside, New York 

(Hunter College) 
Milberg, Mona, Great Neck, New York 

(State University at Albany) 
Moreno, Tracey Judith, Great Neck, New York 

(Cornell University) 

Nelson, Deborah Webster, Slingerlands, 
New York (Junior College of Albany) 

Ottman, Ava Marie, New York, New York 
(Rosemount College) 

Pfeil, Amy Theresa, Deer Park, New York 
(Valparaiso University) 

Radici, Suzanne Marie, Norwood, New Jersey 

(Fairleigh Dickinson University) 
Redd, Sharon M., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

(Cornell University) 
Revell, Cynthia Jane, Winnetka, Illinois 

(Foothills College) 
Ridley, Deborah Lynn, Englewood, New Jersey 

(Muhlenburg College) 
Rinsdale, Helen Frances, Bronx, New York 

(State University at Stonybrook) 
Rudansky, Deborah Jane, Garden City, New York 

(Finch College) 



Sacco, Mona Joan, Lynbrook, New York 

(College of New Rochelle) 
Scharadin, Sarah Meg, Orwigsburg, Pennsylvania 

(Kings College) 
Schwartz, Marcee Ann, Sacramento, California 

(Cornell University) 
Smith, Claire T. R., Woodside, New York 

(State University at New Paltz) 
Smith, Helen Louise, New Hartford, Connecticut 

(Hartford College for Women) 
Sumner, Susan Eileen, Schenectady, New York 

(State University at Brockport) 
Surval, Laura Ellen, Elmont, New York 

(Cornell University) 
Sylvester, Paula Jo, Dover, New Hampshire 

(University of New Hampshire) 

Thurkauf, Gail Elizabeth, Waldwick, New Jersey 
(Douglass College) 

Underhill, Alexandra, West Islip, New York 
(Hofstra University) 

Van Bennekom, Carla Mary, Lynnfield, 
Massachusetts (Michigan State University) 

Webb, David H., Yonkers, New York 

(Mercy College) 
Weber, Elizabeth J., New Milford, Connecticut 

(Cedarcrest College) 
Wielunski, Ellen Marie, Bohema, New York 

(Suffolk Community College) 
Wildman, Moya Ann, Brooklyn, New York 

(Cornell University) 

Zeek, Susan M., Williamsport, Pennsylvania 
(Susquehanna University) 

Program II 

Abbey, Joan Mamelock, Middletown, New York 

(Kirkland College) 
Arida, Sandra Marie, Brooklyn, New York 

(New York University) 

Benson, Carolyn Rae, Santa Barbara, California 

(George Washington University) 
Bultemeier, Kaye Irene, Fort Wayne, Indiana 

(Valparaiso University) 

Coffey, Mary O'Hare, Forest Hills, New York 

(University of Miami) 
Constantine, Urania K., Holyoke, Massachusetts 

(Westfield State College) 

Evans, Susan Anne, New York, New York 
(Newton College) 

Fowler, Amanda Skouras, Sharon, Connecticut 

(St. John's College) 
Frankel, Barbara Meg, Great Neck, New York 

(Newcomb College) 
Freedman, Judith, New York, New York 

(Hunter College) 

Geneson, Randye Barbara, Brooklyn, New York 

(Brooklyn College) 
Grandinetti, Pamela Mary, Brooklyn, New York 

(Marymount Manhattan College) 



27 Register 



Haesche, Carol Ann, Darien, Connecticut 

(Boston University) 
Hansen, John Peter, Whitestone, New York 

(Bradley University) 
Heavey, Sister Barbara Ann, Fresh Meadows, 

New York (Mt. St. Vincent College) 
Hermanson, Susan Thomas, New York, New York 

(Vassar College) 
Hilleary, Anne Stewart, Boston, Massachusetts 

(Cornell University) 
Hubbard, Dana Ackerly, Boston, Massachusetts 

(Vassar College) 
Hubka, Muriel Sue, Glen Ellyn, Illinois 

(Mount Holyoke College) 
Hyams, Joanne Marie, Binghamton, New York 

(Syracuse University) 

Inouye, Christine Haruko, Sacramento, California 
(University of California, Los Angeles) 

Isner, Gale Frances, North Tarrytown, New York 
(Vassar College) 

MacGuigan, Candace Cole, New York, New York 

(Barnard College) 
Moser, Linda Ann, Norwood, New Jersey 

(Fairleigh Dickinson University) 
Mueller, Elizabeth Fletcher, Irvington, New Jersey 

(Trinity College) 

Naidoff, Leonard Charles, Elizabeth, New Jersey 
(Herbert H. Lehman College) 



O'Hare, Elizabeth, Upper Saddle River, 
New Jersey (Marymount Tarrytown College) 

Ondek, Janet Eleanor, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
(Duke University) 

Perry, Lizabeth, New Canaan, Connecticut 

(Tufts University) 
Plasse, Adrienne Faith, Webster, Massachusetts 

(Rhode Island College) 
Pool, Felicity Milliken, Dublin, New Hampshire 

(Vassar College) 

Seligson, Celia Yvonne, New York, New York 

(City College) 
Steinbart, Ellen Jeannette, Omaha, Nebraska 

(Macalester College) 
Steinfeld, Mary Constance, Salem, Oregon 

(University of Oregon) 

Taussig, Alice Wallace, Englewood, New Jersey 

(Cornell University) 
Thomsen, Kathleen, Putnam Valley, New York 

(Mount St. Mary College) 

Vernace, Frances Lucy, Bayside, New York 
(Marymount Tarrytown College) 

Walstedt, Stephanie Karin, Reston, Virginia 
(University of North Carolina) 



Cornell University 



Index 



Academic standing, 12 

Acceptance, dates of, 9; fee, 14 

Accreditation, 8 

Administration, 21 

Admission, 10; general requirements, 10; 

Program I, 11; Program II, 11 
Applications, 11; dates for filing, 11; fee, 12; 

request for, 29 
Armed Forces programs, 17 
Army Nurse Program, 17 
Assistance, financial, 15 
Bills, payment of, 14 
Biological science courses, 22 
Calendar, 4 

Care of the Adult Patient, 21 
Clinical facilities, 16 
College Scholarship Service, 15 
Community Health, 21 
Continuing Education, Division of, 19; 

application, 19; fee, 19 
Cornell Medical Center, 5; Joint Board, 23 
Cornell University, 5; administration, 23 
Counseling services, 18 
Courses, plan for Program I, 10: plan for 

Program II, 10; course descriptions, 21 
Dean's List, criteria for, 12 
Degree, requirements, 14; with distinction, 14 
'Department of Health, 19 
Dimensions of Nursing, 22 
Dismissal, 12 

Division of Continuing Education, 19 
Expenses, 14 
Facilities, clinical, 19; for instruction, 19; 

recreational, 18; residence, 18 
Faculty, administration, 23; continuing education, 

24; undergraduate, 24 
Fees, 14 
Financial assistance, 15; application for, 15; 

dates for administering, 11 
Foundations of Nursing, 21 
Government, School, 18 
Grades, 12 
Grants, 17 
Guided Study, 22 
Health services, 18 
History of School, 7 
Honor Society, 12 

Human Behavioral Development, 22 
Human Growth and Development, Theories of, 22 
Information, request for, 29; visit for, 11 



Interpersonal Processes in Nursing, 21 

Introduction to Nursing, 21 

Introduction to Research, 22 

Instruction facilities, 19 

Instructors, 24 

Joint Administration Board, 23 

Library, 19 

Living out, 18 

Loans, 15 

Male students, 18 

Married students, 18 

Maternal-Child Nursing, 21 

Navy Nurse Program, 17 

New York Hospital, 7; administration, 23; 

facilities for instruction, 19 
Nursing courses, 21 
Nursing for Activation of Potential, 21 
Nursing in the Social Order, 22 
Nursing major, 8 
Objectives, 8 
Philosophy, 8 
Professors, emeritus, 25 
Program I, 6, 10, 11 
Program II, 6, 10, 11 
Public Health, course, 22 
Recreational facilities, 18 
Refunds, 15 
Regents awards, 17 
Register, 23 

Registration, late, 14; state, 14 
Reinstatement Fee, 14 
Requirements, general, 10; Degree, 14 
Research, Introduction to, 22 
Residence, 18; male students, 18; married 

students, 18; single women, 18 
Scholar Incentive Program, 15 
Scholarships, 15 
Sigma Theta Tau, 12 
Social Order, Nursing in the, 22 
Social science courses, 22 
State registration for graduates, 14 
Students, 25 
Transfer fee, 14 

Transition to Nursing Practice, 21 
Tuition, 14 

Undergraduate Program, 8 
Visiting Nurse, 19 
Visits to the School, 12 
Withdrawal, 12; refund for, 14 



Further Information and Application 
Undergraduate Program 

It is important that persons interested in 
pursuing one of the programs at the School of 
Nursing make plans well in advance so that 
their college programs may be arranged to 
provide the necessary background. 

To receive assistance in such planning, an 
interested student should fill out the form 
on this page and send it to 

Admissions 

Cornell University-New York Hospital School o 

Nursing 
1320 York Avenue 
New York, New York 10021. 

(The writer should include his zip code.) 



Request Form 

□ I wish to receive further information. Please 
place my name on your mailing list. 

□ I wish to apply for admission in September, 



year 

Please send me an application blank for 

□ Program I (after two years of college) 

□ Program II (after four years of college) 



street address 



city 



state 



zip 



date of birth 



name of high school 



address 



date diploma received or expected 



name of college 



address 



List of Announcements 

Following is a list of Announcements 
published by Cornell University to provide 
information on programs, faculty, facilities, 
curricula, and courses of the various 
academic units. 

New York State College of Agriculture and 

Life Sciences 
College of Architecture, Art, and Planning 
College of Arts and Sciences 
Department of Asian Studies 
Graduate School of Business and Public 

Administration 
Field of Education (Graduate) 
College of Engineering 
Engineering at Cornell 
Graduate Study in Engineering and Applied 

Sciences 
General Information* 
Graduate School 

Graduate School: Course Descriptions 
School of Hotel Administration 
New York State College of Human Ecology 
New York State School of Industrial and Labor 

Relations 
Law School 

Medical College (New York City) 
Graduate School of Medical Sciences 

(New York City) 
Cornell University — New York Hospital 

School of Nursing (New York City) 
Graduate School of Nutrition 
Officer Education (ROTC) 
Summer Session 
New York State Veterinary College 

* The Announcement of General Information 
is designed to give prospective students 
pertinent information about all aspects and 
academic units of the University. 

Requests for the publications listed above should 
be addressed to 

Cornell University Announcements 
Edmund Ezra Day Hall 
Ithaca, New York 14850. 

(The writer should include his zip code.) 



arnell University Announcements 




Cornell University- 
New York Hospital 
School of Nursing 



Cornell University 



Cornell University- 
New York Hospital 
School of Nursing 
1320 York Avenue 
New York, New York 10021 
1974-1975 



Cornell University Announcements 

Volume 66 of the Cornell University 
Announcements consists of twenty-two 
catalogs, of which this is number 12, dated 
July 26, 1974. Publication dates: 
twenty-two times a year (four times in 
August; three times in January and March; 
twice in June, July, September, and November; 
once in April, May, October, and December). 
Publisher: Cornell University, Sheldon Court, 
420 College Avenue, Ithaca, New York 14850. 
Second-class postage paid at Ithaca, New York. 



1974-1975 



Academic Calendar 



Orientation, entering class, begins 1:00 p.m. 

Orientation, entering class, ends 12 noon 

Registration, 1-4 p.m. 

Labor Day holiday 

Fall term instruction begins, all classes 
8:00 a.m. 

School holiday 

Midsemester grades due, 5:00 p.m. 
(Class of 1975) 

Progress grades due, 5:00 p.m. (Class of 1976) 

Instruction suspended, 1:00 p.m. 

Thanksgiving recess 

Instruction resumed, 7:30 a.m. 

Fall term instruction ends, 5:00 p.m. 

Study period 

Final examinations and clinical evaluation 
begin, 9:00 a.m. 

Final examinations and clinical evaluation 
end, 5:00 p.m. 

Christmas recess and intersession 

Registration, new and rejoining students 

Registration, continuing students 

Spring term instruction, all classes, begins 
8:00 a.m. 

Spring recess 

Instruction resumed, 7:30 a.m. 

Midsemester grades due, 5:00 p.m. 



Wednesday, August 28 
Friday, August 30 
Friday, August 30 
Monday, September 2 

Tuesday, September 3 
Monday, October 14 

Friday, October 25 
Friday, November 15 
Wednesday, November 27 

Monday, December 2 
Monday, December 16 
Tuesday, December 17 

Wednesday, December 18 

Friday, December 20 

Thursday, January 30 
Friday, January 31 

Monday, February 3 
Saturday, March 22 
Monday, March 31 
Wednesday, April 2 









Spring term instruction ends, 5:00 p.m. 
(Class of 1975) 

Spring term instruction ends, 5:00 p.m. 
(Class of 1976) 

Final examinations and clinical evaluation 
begin, 9:00 a.m. 

Final examinations and clinical evaluation 
end, 5:00 p.m. 

Memorial Day holiday 

Convocation and Commencement 



Thursday, May 15 

Friday, May 16 

Monday, May 19 

Friday, May 23 
Monday, May 26 
Wednesday, May 28 






The dates shown in the Academic Calendar 
are subject to change at any time by official 
action of Cornell University. 

In enacting this calendar, the University Senate 
has scheduled classes on religious holidays. 
It is the intent of Senate legislation that stu- 
dents missing classes due to the observance 
of religious holidays be given ample oppor- 
tunity to make up work. 



Announcements 



Contents 



2 Academic Calendar 

7 History of the School 

8 Accreditation 

8 The Undergraduate Program 

11 Admission 

12 Grades and Academic Standing 
14 Degree Requirements 

14 State Registration for Graduates 

14 Expenses 

15 Financial Assistance 
18 Armed Services 

18 General Information 

20 Division of Continuing Education 

20 Facilities for Instruction 

23 Description of Courses 

27 Register 

33 Index 

35 Application 

36 List of Announcements 



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Cornell University 



Cornell University-New York Hospital 
School of Nursing 



History of the School 



The Cornell University-New York Hospital 
School of Nursing was established as a school 
in Cornell University in 1942, on the sixty-fifth 
anniversary of the founding of The New York 
Hospital School of Nursing. One of the earliest 
nursing schools in the country, the School is 
part of the New York Hospital-Cornell Medical 
Center, which includes also the Cornell 
University Medical College and the various 
buildings of The New York Hospital extending 
from Sixty-eighth to Seventy-first Streets on 
the East River. 

The Center is a joint undertaking of The Society 
of the New York Hospital and Cornell 
University, and is committed to a fourfold 
purpose including: (1) care of the sick, pro- 
viding the same wisdom and skill to rich and 
poor; (2) education of doctors and nurses, 
research workers, technicians, and others who 
will work in the field of medical science; (3) 
research to extend the boundaries of knowl- 
edge in the health fields; and (4) the promotion 
of public health through the development of 
preventive medicine. 

The New York Hospital is the second-oldest 
voluntary hospital in this country — its royal 
charter having been granted in 1771 in the 
reign of King George III. The first patients 
were soldiers wounded in the Revolutionary 
War. At that time the Hospital was located on 
the lower end of Manhattan, the only part of 
the city then settled. On early maps the loca- 
tion was designated simply as "the Hospital." 

Cornell University, with its campus in Ithaca, 
New York, received its charter in 1865. Three 
circumstances contributed to the founding of 
the University in the eventful years that 
marked the close of the Civil War. In the first 
place, Ezra Cornell, a citizen of Ithaca, had 
come into a large fortune from his holdings 
in the newly formed Western Union Telegraph 
Company and had devoted much thought to 
the good that might be done by giving his 



wealth to education. A second circumstance 
was the fact that the state of New York had 
received a substantial land grant, under the 
Morrill Act of 1862, for the support of 
colleges teaching agriculture and the 
mechanical arts. The third circumstance was 
that Mr. Cornell had as a colleague in the 
state legislature of 1864-65, a young senator 
named Andrew D. White, later to become the 
first president of the University, who had the 
vision of preserving the state's land grant 
intact for a single great institution which should 
teach not only agriculture and the mechanical 
arts but the humanities and the sciences as 
well. The Medical College, the School of 
Nursing, and the Graduate School of Medical 
Sciences are the divisions of the University 
which are located in New York City. 

The Hospital had been operating for over one 
hundred years before a school for the training 
of nurses was opened. Early steps had been 
taken, however, to improve the care given to 
patients. In 1799 Dr. Valentine Seamen, a 
scholar and prominent physician, had organized 
a series of lectures, combined with a course of 
practical instruction in the wards, for the 
women whom the Hospital had engaged as 
"watchers" and "nurses." Although the 
theoretical content was meager and the 
practical instruction not systematically planned, 
these classes focused attention on the fact 
that women who had some preparation for 
their work gave better care than those with- 
out instruction. When, in 1873, the first training 
school in this country on the Nightingale 
pattern was opened in Bellevue Hospital, the 
Governors of The Society of the New York 
Hospital contributed to its support. Four years 
later, in 1877, when the Hospital moved to 
new buildings, The New York Hospital Training 
School for Nurses was opened in quarters 
which were considered to have all the modern 
improvements of the times. The School moved 
to the present location when the Medical 
Center was opened in 1932. 

The health needs of the community and 
country have been the guiding force in the 
development of the School, which has modi- 



8 The Undergraduate Program 



tied its program to keep pace with these 
needs. Today, the work of the professional 
nurse requires much more self-direction and 
leadership ability than in the past, and, in 
recognition of this, the University program 
was established in 1942. Since 1946, all stu- 
dents admitted to the School have been 
candidates for the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Nursing. 

The Division of Continuing Education was 
organized as an educational unit of the School 
of Nursing in 1971. Although it is a nondegree- 
granting division of the School, it has the 
same status within the structure as the organi- 
zational unit for undergraduate programs lead- 
ing to a degree. 

The Cornell University-New York Hospital 
School of Nursing Alumni Association, 
originally the Alumnae Association of The New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, was organized 
in 1893. It was one of the ten alumnae asso- 
ciations which helped to bring about the 
national professional organization of nurses, 
now known as the American Nurses' Associa- 
tion. In 1945 the Alumni Association became a 
part of the Cornell University Alumni 
Association. 



Accreditation 

The School is accredited by the Department of 
Baccalaureate and Higher Degree Programs 
of the National League for Nursing as a 
generic college program leading to a 
baccalaureate degree. 

The School is registered by the State Educa- 
tion Department, Division of Professional 
Education of the University of the State of 
New York. 

The Undergraduate Program 

The School accepts its responsibility for the 
preparation of a professional nurse by offering 
a curriculum based on the following 
philosophy and objectives. 

Philosophy 

Education is a process that helps individuals 
to develop their potential so that they may func- 
tion productively within existing and changing 
social systems. This is a dynamic process 
involving the active participation of the student 
and the teacher. The school provides the 
environment in which students can test their 
abilities and evaluate their progress. 

The major purposes of the general education 
courses preceding the nursing major are: 



to instill knowledge, to cultivate intellectual 
skills, and to nurture the traits of personality 
and character basic to a reasoned and re- 
sponsible life. Because of the foundation 
provided by these courses, it is anticipated 
that students will be prepared to better under- 
stand themselves, their social and physical 
environment, and the role of the professional 
nurse in society. 

Professional nurses assume responsibility for 
maintaining optimum standards for the planning, 
evaluation, and the delivery of nursing care in 
a variety of settings. They also function as 
members of the interdisciplinary health team 
in the planning, evaluation, and delivery of 
health care. They recognize the need to speak 
on both community and professional issues 
which are within their field of competence or 
interest and to assist in promoting public 
involvement in health by defining and clarifying 
health issues. As professional people they 
recognize the need to continue to develop 
personal and professional competence through 
the formal and informal educational structures 
which are best suited to their needs and 
abilities. 

Objectives 

Upon completion of the program, the graduate 
functions as a beginning-level professional 
nurse practitioner in a variety of settings. 

The graduate will: (1) use the intellectual skills 
of observation, assessment, planning, and 
evaluation to establish and implement nursing 
goals; (2) understand how man functions in 
relationship to himself and others in health and 
sickness; (3) apply principles of leadership in 
directing nursing care of patients; (4) function 
as a colleague with members of an inter- 
disciplinary team; (5) possess a foundation for 
continuing professional development in 
nursing; (6) maintain the standards of nursing 
services through constant assessment of 
existing practices and through participation 
in professional and community organizations; 
and (7) recognize the structures of a variety 
of health care systems and the effect which 
the structure has on the nature of nursing 
practice. 

The Nursing Major 

The nursing major, consisting of four semesters 
of full-time study, is offered in two programs 
identified as Program I and Program II. Both 
programs are based upon the philosophy that 
general education courses provide the founda- 
tion for the professional courses of the 
nursing major. In keeping with this philosophy, 
course requirements in the humanities, social 
sciences, and natural sciences have been 



10 The Undergraduate Program 



identified as prerequisites for both programs. 
Sixty general educa-tion credits are required 
for admission to Program I. In addition to 
presenting the required prerequisites for the 
nursing major, students who enroll in 
Program II are required to hold a baccalaureate 
degree in another discipline before admission 
to the professional program. Both programs 
lead to the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Nursing. 

The programs are planned so that the student 
moves from less-complex situations in the care 
of individuals and families, to those situations 
which test ability to provide leadership in the 
delivery of health services. Initially attention 
is focused on the acquisition of nursing skills 
and the role of the professional nurse in 
the care of adult patients. 

In the courses of the second and third 
semesters, the student studies the patient in 
the hospital, the home, and the community. 
The content of one semester deals with the 
family in which childbearing women, their 
children, and their family, provide the focus 
for the learning experiences. The content and 
experiences offered in the alternate semester, 
provide the student with the opportunity to 
explore the needs of patients and families who 
are facing problems of short- and long-term 
physical and emotional illnesses. Study of the 
effect of the environment upon health and 
disease is correlated with the content of this 
semester. 

In the final semester the student cares for 
patients with multiple nursing needs including 
more complex medical-surgical problems. 
The student learns the principles of leader- 
ship and has the opportunity to apply them in 
the clinical setting. 

Courses in the biological and social sciences 
are offered concurrently with the nursing 
courses. Pharmacology, nutrition, and diet 
therapy are included in the nursing courses 
of the curriculum. 

Each student entering the school is expected 
to complete the entire program for which he or 
she is enrolled. To meet the objectives of 
the program, students will have clinical ex- 
periences in a variety of hospital and com- 
munity settings. In order to be eligible for the 
degree from Cornell, the last year must be 
spent in full-time study in one of these pro- 
grams. The faculty reserves the right to 
make changes in the curriculum which it 
believes are in keeping with the changing 
needs of society or the best interests of the 
student and the school. 



Plan of Program I 

Detailed descriptions of the courses listed 
below may be found beginning on p. 23. 

Third Year 
Fall semester 
Nursing 153-156 
Nursing 160 
Biological Science 130 
Social Science 109 



Spring semester 
Nursing 155 
Social Science 110 
Biological Science 132 



Fourth Year 
Fall semester 
Nursing 154 
Public Health 246 
Biological Science 131 



Spring semester 
Nursing 250 
Social Science 108 
Social Science 207 



Hours 

10 

1 

4 

2 

17 

11 
2 

3 

16 



10 
2 
3 

15 

12 
3 
2 

17 



Plan of Program II 

Detailed descriptions of the courses listed 
below may be found beginning on p. 23. 

First Year 
Fall semester 
Nursing 153-156 
Nursing 160 
Biological Science 133 
Social Science 109 



Hours 

10 

1 

3 

2 

16 



Spring semester 
Nursing 157 
Social Science 1 10 
Biological Science 134 



Second Year 
Fall semester 
Nursing 256 
Biological Science 136 



Spring semester 
Nursing 257 
Social Science 108 
Social Science 207 



10 
2 
3 

15 



10 
3 

13 

12 
3 
2 

17 



11 Admission 



Admission 

General Requirements 

The number of qualified applicants exceeds the 
number of students that can be admitted to 
the two programs of the nursing major each 
year. Applicants selected will be those who, 
in competition with others seeking admission at 
the same time, have demonstrated by their 
qualifications that they are well fitted for the 
nursing profession. 

Evaluation of the candidate's ability to profit 
from the instruction at the School of Nursing is 
based on secondary school and college 
records, the recommendations of school 
authorities, and the results of standardized 
achievement tests; evidence of the candidate's 
ability to make effective use of free time, and 
capacity for leadership and concern for 
others, is given due consideration. Evaluations 
are also made on the basis of extracurricular 
activities, references, and an interview. 
Interviews are granted only to those applicants 
meeting certain minimum admission standards. 
A final disposition on a student's application 
cannot be made unless the student attends a 
personal interview at the School of Nursing. 
An extensive medical report is required because 
of the nature of the professional program. 

Students already enrolled in the nursing major 
of another college or university may request 
the evaluation of their college records for 
possible transfer to the School at Cornell. 

It is the policy of Cornell University actively 
to support equality of educational opportunity. 
No student shall be denied admission to the 
University or be discriminated against other- 
wise because of race, color, creed, religion, 
national origin, or sex. 

Specific Requirements for Program I 

Students who have completed a minimum of 
sixty semester hours in any university, college, 
or junior college accredited by one of the 
regional associations of colleges and secondary 
schools may apply for transfer to Program I 
of the nursing major. Applicants to this Program 
are required to take the NLN Pre-Nursing and 
Guidance Examination. 

The following distribution of courses is to be 
used as a guideline in planning a program for 
the first two years of college. Records will be 
reviewed on an individual basis and adjust- 
ments made. 

Communications, 6 credits: composition, public 
speaking, or speech. 

Humanities, 20-30 credits: art, language, 
literature, music, philosophy, religion. No 
credit will be granted for studio humanities 
courses, such as painting, ceramics, voice, etc. 



Natural science and mathematics, 12 credits: 
general biology (4 credits) and general chem- 
istry (4 credits) are required. Those applicants 
who did not take biology or chemistry in 
high school are required to take a year of that 
particular science in college. Based on 
individual evaluation, other college science 
and mathematics may be accepted in place 
of additional credits in biology and chemistry. 
Transfer credit will not be granted for science 
courses with an ecological or social science 
approach. 

Social science and history, 12-22 credits: 
sociology (3 credits required), psychology 
(3 credits required), political science, 
anthropology, economics. 

Specific Requirements for Program II 

Persons who hold or are to be awarded a 
baccalaureate degree by an accredited senior 
college or university may be considered for 
admission to this Program of the nursing 
major. Applicants will be required to take the 
Graduate Record Examination. 

The following distribution of courses is required 
for admission to Program II. 

Humanities, 10 credits. 

Social science, 10 credits. 

Natural science, 8 credits. Although records are 
reviewed on an individual basis, general biol- 
ogy (4 credits) and general chemistry (4 credits) 
are considered essential prerequisites. Those 
applicants who did not take biology or 
chemistry in high school are required to take 
a year of that particular science in college. 
Transfer credit will not be granted for science 
courses with an ecological or social science 
approach. 

Applications 

Prospective students should write the Office of 
Admissions, Cornell University-New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1320 York Avenue, 
New York, New York 10021, for forms to be 
used in making application for admission. 

Important Dates 

The following information and dates apply for 
applicants to both programs of the nursing 
major. Requests for applications may be 
made any time after May 1, 1974, for admis- 
sion in September 1975. 

Admissions applications are due by October 1, 
1974, for early review and by January 1, 1975, 
for regular review. Applications will be 
released and accepted after January 1, if 
places remain to be filled. 

Early review decisions are announced by 
January 1. Though all applicants who have 



12 Grades and Academic Standing 



completed their applications by October 1 will 
be interviewed in the fall, only those meeting 
the criteria for early review will receive their 
admissions decision by January 1. In addition 
those applicants who do not qualify for the 
program will be notified once their application 
has been reviewed. Decisions made by regular 
review are announced in March and April. 
Applications submitted after January 1 will be 
acted upon as they are completed. 

Each applicant accepted by regular review 
must advise the School of his or her decision 
regarding admission within two weeks of 
acceptance. Upon acceptance, early review 
applicants will be advised of the date their 
decision is due. 

The Financial Assistance Application must be 
filed by February 1. Decisions are announced 
May 1. Offers must be accepted within three 
weeks of receipt. 

Visits to the School 

Members of the staff are available to meet with 
prospective applicants to discuss the School's 
admission requirements, application procedures, 
and the appropriateness of the applicant's 
general education in satisfying the requirements 
for admission. Although appointments for these 
visits are not required, prospective applicants 
are urged to call the Admissions Office before 
visiting the School. 

An informational visit does not take the place 
of the required interview which is scheduled 
after application materials have been submitted 
and reviewed. 



Grades and Academic Standing 

The Academic Standards Committee, composed 
of faculty representing the two nursing pro- 
grams and the dean or her representative, 
meets at least two times each year to review 
the academic records of students in the School. 
The Committee is responsible for reviewing 
the records of students whose suitability for 
nursing is in question, whose cumulative 
average does not meet minimal standards for 
promotion, whose cumulative average has 
dropped seriously since the previous semester, 
or students whose performance in the major 
nursing course is below the acceptable level 
of achievement. 

The Committee recommends to the faculty the 
promotion of all students and the candidates 
for the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Nursing. The Committee acts on the records of 
those students who qualify for the Dean's List 
and those who are to be considered for 
graduation with distinction. 

The grading system is based on a 4.0 scale 
as follows: 4.0-3.5 (100-90% =A) excellent 



to very good; 3.4-2.5 (89-80% = B) good; 

2.4-1.5 (79-70% =C) satisfactory to marginal; 

1.4-0.5 (69-60% = D) below acceptable level; 

0.4-0.0 (Below 60% = F) failing. 

S and U Grades: Final grades of S (satisfactory) 
and U (unsatisfactory) may also be given in 
certain courses and for all clinical laboratory 
courses. A grade of S is equivalent to 1.5 or 
higher; a grade of U is equivalent to 1.4 or 
lower. The specified course credit will be 
given for grades of S; no credit will be given 
for grades of U. S and U grades are not used 
in computing grade point averages. 

Incomplete Grades: An incomplete (INC) is a 
temporary grade. It is given only when students 
are unable to complete all the requirements 
for a course because of illness and/or pro- 
longed absence due to circumstances beyond 
their control. 

Students who receive an incomplete in a 
course, unless it is a prerequisite course, are 
required to complete the course work within 
one year after the grade is recorded or the 
grade will be changed to a U. If the incom- 
plete is in a course that is prerequisite to 
another course, the student must complete the 
required work before registering for the 
subsequent course. 

Notice of Grades: Grades are issued directly 
to the students at the end of each semester. 
Parents and guardians may be notified when a 
student is placed on academic warning and/or 
asked to withdraw from the School. 

Academic Standing 

In order to be in good standing for a semester, 
a student must: (1) attain a grade of 2.0 or 
better in nursing theory, 1.5 or better in re- 
lated courses, and S in clinical laboratory 
courses; and (2) have a minimal cumulative 
average (M.C.A.) for the semester as follows: 
first semester, 1.6; second semester, 1.76; 
third semester, 1.82; and fourth semester, 1.83. 

Students whose grades or averages fall below 
these levels at midsemester and/or end of 
semester will be placed on academic warning 
by the Office of the Dean. A student may 
remain on academic warning for only one 
semester. If the conditions of the warning have 
not been removed by the end of the next 
semester, the student will be required to 
withdraw from the School of Nursing. 

Dean's List 

Effective with the Class of 1976, students who 
attain a semester average of 3.50 without any 
D or U grades and have completed all of 
the required course work by the end of the 
semester are eligible for the Dean's List. The 
Dean's List will be posted by the Office of 
Records. 




V X 







14 Expenses 



Dismissal 

The faculty of the School of Nursing reserves 
the privilege of retaining only those students 
who in their judgment demonstrate satisfactory 
progress towards the degree, meeting the 
requirements of scholarship, mental and 
physical health, and personal attributes con- 
sidered suitable for professional nursing 
practice. Students whose suitability for nurs- 
ing is questioned may be asked to withdraw 
from the School. 

Withdrawal 

A student may withdraw from the School at 
any time. The designation of withdrawal in 
good standing will be recorded if the student's 
academic and personal performance is in 
accord with the standards of the school and 
the financial record has been cleared. A stu- 
dent who plans to withdraw must notify the 
Office of Records and discuss the reason for 
leaving with the dean. 

Degree Requirements 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing 
is conferred by Cornell University upon 
recommendation of the faculty of the School 
of Nursing. In order to qualify for the degree, 
the candidate must have attained the required 
cumulative average for the total program and 
have completed satisfactorily all theory and 
clinical laboratory courses outlined in this 
Announcement and/or required by decision of 
the faculty. 

Bachelor of Science with Distinction 

Upon recommendation of the faculty, the 
degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing with 
distinction will be conferred upon those stu- 
dents who: have achieved a cumulative average 
of 3.50 (effective with the Class of 1976), 
completed all requirements for the degree, 
and attained a grade point average of B for 
college work completed prior to transferring 
to the School of Nursing. 

Sigma Theta Tau 

In 1968 the School received a charter for the 
Alpha Upsilon chapter of Sigma Theta Tau, 
the National Honor Society of Nursing. The 
purposes of the Society are to recognize 
the achievement of scholarship of superior 
quality, to promote the development of leader- 
ship qualities, and to encourage creative work 
while fostering high professional ideals. It is 
hoped that the commitment of the individual 
to the ideals and purposes of professional 
nursing will be strengthened by participation 
in the Honor Society. 



Students who have completed at least one-half 
of the nursing major, and have a minimum 
grade point average of 3.0, are considered for 
induction into Alpha Upsilon chapter. In addi- 
tion to demonstrated superior scholastic 
achievement, a candidate must also give evi- 
dence of professional leadership potential. 

State Registration for Graduates 

Graduates of the School are urged to take the 
state board examination for licensure which 
is administered by the State Education Depart- 
ment of New York. Each graduate is expected 
to take the first examination for licensure which 
is administered after the student has com- 
pleted the nursing program. Graduates who 
plan to work outside of New York State should 
determine whether the state has a mandatory 
licensure law. If so, the graduate is urged 
to establish a date of employment based upon 
the expected date of licensure. Satisfactory 
completion of this examination licenses the 
graduate of the School as a Registered Nurse 
(R.N.). The application for the examination 
is released by the Office of Records during 
the final semester in which the student is 
registered in the School. 



Expenses 



The costs of attending the School of Nursing 
fall into two general categories. The first 
category includes certain fixed charges for 
tuition, fees, and charges for services pro- 
vided by the School. The second category 
includes living costs and items of personal 
expense. To help students prepare their indi- 
vidual budgets an estimated budget is pub- 
lished. Although expenses, excluding fixed 
fees, vary for the individual student, the esti- 
mated budget reflects the usual expenses for 
single, full-time students living in University 
housing. 

The estimated total expenses include: 

Item Estimate 

Tuition $2050 

*Housing 750 

Food and maintenance 1000 

Books and supplies 250 

Uniforms, entering students 250 

Transportation, clinical experience 150 

Incidental expenses 450 
**Health insurance 

* Housing: Beginning with the 1974-1975 
school year, students will be housed in apart- 
ment facilities, Lasdon House. The estimated 
cost is based on three or four students sharing 
an apartment for a nine month period. Details 
regarding housing should be available during 
the April preceding the next school year. 



15 Financial Assistance 



Fees 

Application Fee. (For applicants registered in 
a general education program.) A fee of $20 
must accompany the application for first 
admission. 

Transfer Fee. (For applicants registered in a 
baccalaureate nursing program.) A fee of $25 is 
charged to evaluate the record of a student 
already registered in a baccalaureate nursing 
program who wishes to apply for transfer 
to this School. 

Reinstatement Fee. (For students previously 
registered in this School.) A fee of $10 will be 
charged to evaluate the record of a former 
student seeking to reregister in this School. 

Acceptance Fee. A nonrefundable deposit 
of $50 is required of every student upon 
acceptance for admission to the University; 
and when the student first registers, it is used 
to cover matriculation costs. The deposit does 
not apply to the first semester's tuition and 
fees. 

Late Registration Fee. A fee of $5 is charged 
to each late registrant. First semester registra- 
tion closes 5 p.m., August 30, 1974. Second 
semester registration closes 5 p.m., Friday, 
January 31, 1975. 

Payment of Bills 

Bills for fixed charges are distributed approxi- 
mately two weeks prior to each semester. The 
bill is due and payable at registration each 
semester, unless special arrangements have 
been made with the School. The amount, time, 
and manner of payment of tuition, fees, or 
other charges may be changed at any time 
without notice. Students who have questions 
regarding their bills or the payment of grants 
or loans should see the assistant to the dean, 
in NR 214. 

Provision is made for the payment of bills during 
the registration period at the beginning of 

** Health insurance: Each student is required 
to be enrolled in a health insurance plan. An 
associated hospital plan is available to all 
students in the Medical Center. Students will 
be exempt from enrollment in the Center plan if 
they give evidence of carrying comparable 
health insurance and sign a waiver to that 
effect at the time of admission and every 
semester thereafter while registered in the 
School. Students enrolled in the plan available 
at the Medical Center will be billed each 
semester. These charges will appear as a 
separate item on the bill and will reflect the 
current insurance rates. Questions concern- 
ing waivers or billing should be discussed with 
the assistant to the dean, NR 214. 



each semester. Financial assistance awarded by 
the School, except loans, will be applied 
directly to the fixed charges. No reimburse- 
ment of assistance offered as a grant is 
anticipated unless the student voluntarily leaves 
the School during the course of a semester. 
In this case, a proportionate amount of the 
grant, not to exceed one-half, is to be 
reimbursed. 

In order for a student to remain in good 
standing, receive an honorable withdrawal from 
the School, or participate in the commence- 
ment exercises, all bills must be paid and 
satisfactory arrangements made for the future 
repayment of loans. Any student who registers 
for a semester and then withdraws before 
the semester bill is paid must make a satisfactory 
settlement of tuition and fees due before the 
withdrawal form can be signed. 

A student completes arrangements for a loan 
authorized by the School by signing a note and 
receiving the check during the registration 
period. The proceeds of a loan must be applied 
first to the balance due on School charges 
but may not be claimed as an exemption from 
the bill. 

New York State scholarships and incentive 
awards may not be claimed as an exemption 
from the tuition bill since the state prepares 
individual checks, which are payable to the 
student, and sends them to the School for 
distribution. Checks for these awards will not 
be available at the time tuition and fees are 
due. When an extension of time for payment of 
part or all of the tuition and fees is granted, 
based on a New York State award, it is with 
the understanding that should the state for 
any reason fail to prepare a check for the 
amount of the award, the student is personally 
responsible for the amount due. 

Refunds 

Part of the tuition will be refunded to students 
who officially withdraw during the first half 
of the semester. The refund will be based on a 
deduction of ten percent a week on all 
charges as of the first day of the semester. 
No refund will be made after the midsemester. 



Financial Assistance 

In general, students plan to meet the cost of 
their education through self-help (loans and 
employment). To the extent that is possible, 
parents and spouse are expected to con- 
tribute to the cost of a student's education. 

The Cornell University-New York Hospital 
School of Nursing participates in the College 
Scholarship Service (CSS) of the College 
Entrance Examination Board. Participants in 



17 Financial Assistance 



CSS subscribe to the principle that the amount 
of financial assistance granted a student 
should be based upon financial need. The CSS 
assists colleges and universities and other 
agencies in determining the student's need for 
financial assistance. Each entering student 
who seeks financial assistance is required to 
submit a copy of the appropriate Confidential 
Statement form to the College Scholarship 
Service by February 1, designating Cornell 
University-New York Hospital School of Nurs- 
ing as one of the recipients. The Confidential 
Statement should be obtained from the School 
of Nursing. 

Financial assistance is offered to students 
usually as a combination of scholarship or 
grant, loan, and employment. The scholarships 
and grants administered by the School are 
described below. These are assigned on the 
basis of need rather than academic rating. 

Loans are available from a fund established 
jointly by the School and the federal gov- 
ernment under the terms of Public Law 92-158, 
Nurse Training Act of 1971. No more than 
$2,500 may be borrowed by a student during 
an academic year. The amount of loan awarded 
to each eligible student is dependent upon 
the total amount of federal funding made 
available to the School. To be eligible for 
either a grant or a loan, a student must intend 
to be enrolled at least half-time and demon- 
strate the need for financial assistance. 
In addition, the student must be a citizen or 
national of the United States, or have 
immigration status and personal plans to 
justify the conclusion that he or she intends 
to become a permanent resident of the United 
States. 

Application for Financial Assistance 

Entering students who will need financial assist- 
ance should return the Financial Assistance 
Application with their application forms by 
February 1. These will be forwarded to the 
chairman of the Financial Assistance Committee. 
The Confidential Statement should be filed 
through the College Scholarship Service by 
February 1, of the year the applicant anticipates 
admission to the School of Nursing. 

Students enrolled in the School who expect to 
register for the next academic year and who 
anticipate the need for financial assistance, 
should make appointments to see the chairman 
of the Financial Assistance Committee before 
December 15. Students receiving financial 
assistance may arrange an interview with the 
chairman of the committee during the fall 
semester to review their awards. Those who 
may or may not be receiving financial assistance 
and whose family situations change during an 
academic year, should feel free to discuss their 
problems with the chairman of the committee. 



Financial Assistance Administered 
by the School 

Vivian B. Allen Scholarship Fund. Established 
as an endowed fund by gifts from the Vivian B. 
Allen Foundation, Inc.; income from which is 
used to provide scholarship aid annually for one 
or more students in need of financial assistance. 

Allstate Foundation Grant. A grant is made 
available to the School each year to assist a 
student throughout the program. 

Juliette E. Blohme Scholarship Fund. 

Established as an endowed fund by Dr. and 
Mrs. George H. Van Emburgh as a memorial to 
Juliette E. Blohme of the class of 1922 through 
a gift of $6,000, the interest on which may be 
used in whole or in part each year. 

Fund of the Committee for Scholarships. A 

fund, established and maintained by a 
committee of women interested in the School 
of Nursing, to assist students who need 
financial help in order to prepare for nursing. 
Awards from the fund are made to entering 
students and to students enrolled in the School. 

Cornell Women's Club of New York. In the 

spring of the year a scholarship is made avail- 
able by this Club for the ensuing school year. 
It is awarded either to an entering student or a 
student enrolled in the School. 

Davison/Foreman Foundation Grant. Grants 
from this Foundation are allocated in the spring 
semester for the education of women working 
for a college degree. The awards are made 
to students enrolled in the School. 

Samuel J. Moritz Scholarship Fund. Estab- 
lished in 1960 as a memorial to Samuel J. Moritz, 
and made possible by a gift from Edward Moritz 
and LeRoy Moses, executors of his estate. 
The income provides scholarship aid annually 
to one or more students in need of financial 
assistance. 

Helena Rubinstein Foundation, Inc. Grant. 

Grants from this Foundation are made available 
to the School and administered to students 
who have demonstrated need for financial 
assistance. 

The Switzer Foundation Grant. A grant of 
$1,500 is made available to the School each 
year. This grant is intended to assist students 
who are American citizens living within fifty 
miles of New York City and who have financial 
need. 

Tudor Foundation Student Loan Fund. A loan 
Fund established by the Foundation and 
administered by the School to assist students 
in need of aid who hold scholarships or grants 
to defray the cost of tuition and who need 



18 General Information 



further financial assistance to enable them 
to attend the School. Loans from the Fund 
are not to exceed $1,000 to any one student in 
any one school year. 

Women's Florist Association, Inc., Scholarship. 

Under a scholarship plan established in 1949 
by the Women's Florist Association, Inc., a 
nursing student who has satisfactorily com- 
pleted one year of the nursing major is eligible 
for a scholarship not to exceed the sum of $200. 
This scholarship is to be used for tuition by a 
student in financial need. Since 1959, two of 
these scholarships have been made available 
to the School of Nursing each year. 

The Christian C. Yegen Scholarship Fund. 

Established in the spring of 1965 as a memorial 
to Mr. Christian C. Yegen, father of an alumna 
of the Cornell University-New York Hospital 
School of Nursing. 

Financial Assistance Administered 
by Outside Sources 

New York State Regents Scholarships, 
Grants, and Loans 

The following scholarships are available for 
residents of New York State. Applicants should 
apply through their high school principal 
while they are still students in high school. 

For more information on any of these, write to 
the State Education Department, State University 
of New York, Albany, New York 12224 request- 
ing the leaflet Opening the Door to College 
Study through the New York State Regents 
Scholarship Examination. 

Regents Scholarships for Basic Professional 
Education in Nursing. Amount, $200-$500 a 
year depending upon financial need; applicable 
only to the period in the School of Nursing. 

Regents College Scholarships. Amount, $250- 
$1,000 a year depending upon financial need 
for a maximum of five years; applicable to the 
first two years of college and to the period in 
the School of Nursing. 

Regents Scholarships in Cornell. A tuition- 
reducing scholarship ranging in amount from 
$100 to $1,000 a year depending upon financial 
need for a maximum of four years; applicable 
to the first two years of college and to the 
period in the School of Nursing. 

Regents Scholarships for Children of Deceased 
or Disabled Veterans. Amount, $450 a year 
for four years; applicable to the first two years 
of college and to the period in the School of 
Nursing. 

New York Higher Education Assistance 
Corporation sponsors a program through which 



students may obtain loans from local savings 
banks. 

Scholar Incentive Program. Grants of $100— 
$600 yearly, depending on need and tuition 
paid, with a minimum yearly grant of $100. 
For those students who demonstrate a capacity 
to pursue a degree and plan to attend college, 
and to those who are presently in college and 
maintain satisfactory academic performance. 

Armed Services 

Army and Navy Nurse Corps 
Student Programs 

Students in either of the basic nursing programs 
may apply for appointments in the Army 
Student Nurse Program six to eight weeks 
prior to entrance to the School, or to the 
Navy Nurse Corps Candidates Program prior 
to March 1, for fall entrance. The student must 
have had receipt of acceptance to Cornell 
University-New York Hospital School of Nursing 
before the applications will be considered. The 
appointments carry generous financial allowance. 
A student who participates twelve months or 
less serves on active duty in the respective 
service for twenty-four months. If two years of 
support has been given, the student serves 
thirty-six months. 



General Information 

School Government 

Any student entering the School is automatically 
a member of the student organization. The 
functions of this organization are to contribute 
to the development of the professional educa- 
tion of the individual student through co- 
operation with fellow students and faculty; to 
represent the individual student in matters of 
student-faculty concern; to encourage in the 
student body maturity in matters of scholarship 
and personal conduct; to provide an all- 
inclusive organization through which business 
pertaining to the whole body of students may 
be transacted; and to foster an attitude of 
involvement in student life and development in 
the nursing program. 

Housing Regulations 

Students attending the School of Nursing may 
live in University housing or select their own 
living facilities within the community. Applica- 
tions for University housing should be available 
on or about each April 1. Students living a 
distance from the School should consider the 
time to be spent in commuting each day. 
Classes and clinical experience may be sched- 



20 Facilities for Instruction 



uled Monday through Saturday in a combination 
of hours which may begin as early as 7:30 a.m. 
and end at 9 p.m. 

All students must keep the Office of Records 
informed of their correct address and telephone 
number. The student Handbook outlines the 
system used for distribution of official School 
communications to students. Each student is 
expected to follow the procedure to avoid delay 
in responding to the communications. 

Recreational Facilities 

Because the School believes that the education 
of young men and women today includes 
healthful social relationships, provisions have 
been made for the development of such rela- 
tionships in the life of the student. 

A social committee is responsible for a full and 
varied social calendar which includes such 
activities as dances, skating parties, coffee 
hours, and suppers. Other activities in which 
students may participate are the yearbook and 
singing groups. The director of student relations 
is available at all times to advise students in 
the organization of discussion groups and in 
the planning of social and cultural activities. 

Health Services 

Personnel Health Service, maintained by The 
New York Hospital, provides health care for 
students enrolled in the School. This includes 
ambulatory medical care in the outpatient clinics 
and, when indicated, the admission to The 
New York Hospital. Students are expected to 
take corrective action for any health problem 
including dental work prior to registration in 
the School. Elective procedures required after 
admission are to be scheduled during vacation 
periods. 

Upon registration in the School, each student 
has a complete physical examination including 
routine tests. The student's health is closely 
monitored by Personnel Health Service through- 
out the program. However, each student is 
expected to be self-directive in maintaining a 
positive health status. 

Students are expected to report illnesses and/or 
other health problems promptly. The Office of 
Records is to be notified when the student will 
be unable to attend classes or clinical 
laboratory. 

If in the opinion of the Personnel Health Service 
physician, the condition of a student's physical 
or emotional health makes it unwise for the 
student to remain in the program, the School 
authorities may require the student to withdraw 
either temporarily or permanently at any time. 



Counseling Services 

The School maintains active counseling services 
which are available to any students who need 
assistance, either in connection with routine 
matters that may come up in their work in the 
School or in connection with special personal 
problems. 

The director of student relations assists stu- 
dents in every way possible in their educational, 
personal, and social adjustment, and co- 
operates with the faculty in helping students 
in these areas and directs students to those 
members of the staff who are best qualified 
to be of assistance in relation to the particular 
problem at hand. 

Group therapy is also made available through 
the office of the director of student relations 
to assist students whose effectiveness and 
adjustment are impaired by personal concerns. 

Division of Continuing 
Education 

The Division of Continuing Education is an 
organized educational unit of the School of 
Nursing under the administration of the dean. 

The Division offers organized and planned 
presentations of appropriate educational ex- 
periences at a professional level which are 
university oriented and related to the needs and 
purposes of the employment or practice 
situation. The programs offered by the Division 
have their origins in selected areas of nursing 
practice. The objectives of the programs are 
directed toward enabling registered nurses, both 
in practice and returning to practice, to update 
and expand their knowledge and skills in 
circumscribed areas of clinical nursing practice. 

A variety of special workshops and formalized 
training programs are conducted cooperatively 
with the Cornell University Medical College, 
the professional staffs of The New York 
Hospital-Cornell Medical Center; the Depart- 
ment of Health, Health Services Administration 
of the City of New York; the Visiting Nurse 
Service of New York; and other cooperating 
community agencies. 

Information on programs being offered, 
applications, and fees may be obtained by 
writing to: Division of Continuing Education, 
1320 York Avenue, Room NR 340, New York, 
New York 10021. 



Facilities for Instruction 

The facilities of The New York Hospital-Cornell 
Medical Center provide the setting for the 
major part of the educational program offered 
to students in both divisions of the School of 



21 Facilities for Instruction 



Nursing. The classroom and office facilities 
for the School are located at 1320 York Avenue, 
New York City. In addition to the usual class- 
room and conference room facilities there is 
an audiovisual laboratory and learning labo- 
ratories for the practice of basic nursing skills. 

The library, in the Samuel J. Wood Library and 
Research Building, is shared by the students 
and the faculties of the School of Nursing and 
the Medical College, and the staff of The New 
York Hospital. 

The reading room of the library is located on 
the first floor. Adjoining the reading room are 
the sections for current journals, reference works, 
and monographs. The book stacks and carrels 
are on two floors below the main reading room. 
Sixteen hundred current journals are received 
each year; the total collection has reached more 
than 100,000 volumes. 

The library is also equipped with a com- 
munication terminal linked to a computer to 
provide searches of the medical literature. The 
Information and Reference Department receives 
requests for these searches. Typing and 
duplicating services and, most importantly, a 
staff willing to help are also available. 

The clinical nursing departments have small 
libraries containing literature pertaining espe- 
cially to the subject matter of the department. 



These collections, interlibrary loans, and photo- 
duplicate copies from other libraries, including 
the National Library of Medicine, supplement 
the main library. 

All students have clinical experience on the 
patient units of The New York Hospital. The 
Hospital comprises five clinical departments — 
Medicine, Surgery, Lying-in Hospital, Pediatrics, 
and The Payne Whitney Clinic (psychiatry). 
Each of these units (largely self-contained) has 
facilities for inpatients and outpatients, and for 
teaching and conducting research. The Hospital 
has approximately eleven hundred beds and 
ninety clinics. 

In order to meet the objectives of the program, 
the School of Nursing contracts with selected 
voluntary and governmental agencies for addi- 
tional clinical experiences. It is a requirement 
of the program that each student participate in 
the care of patients in the community. Repre- 
sentatives of various governmental and voluntary 
agencies plan with the faculty for appro- 
priate ways to contribute to the student's 
knowledge of the community and the organiza- 
tion for human services. Individuals who feel 
it would be difficult to travel within some 
parts of the New York City community and to 
participate fully in assigned experiences, 
should give thoughtful consideration to this 
before registering in the program of the School. 



Cornell University 



Description of Courses 



Nursing Courses 



All academic courses of the University are open 
to students of all races, religions, ethnic origins, 
ages, sexes, and political persuasions. No re- 
quirement, prerequisite, device, rule, or other 
means shall be used by any employee of the 
University to encourage, establish, or maintain 
segregation on the basis of race, religion, ethnic 
origin, age, sex, or political persuasion in any 
academic course of the University. 

153-156 Introduction to the Nursing Process, 
Care of the Adult Patient Fall Credit: five 
hours, theory; five hours, clinical laboratory. 
M. A. Miller and faculty. 

Composed of two units. The first unit is con- 
cerned with introduction of the nursing process, 
and learning and practicing nursing skills 
basic to all nursing care. During the second 
unit, the nursing process is applied to the 
care of adult patients with representative 
medical-surgical health problems. Pharma- 
cology, nutrition, and diet therapy are integrated 
throughout the course. The clinical area is 
utilized to apply concepts and skills in caring 
for patients with major medical-surgical health 
problems. 

154-157 Maternal-Child Nursing Fall and 
spring. Credit: five hours, theory; five hours, 
clinical laboratory Prerequisite: Nursing 153-156. 
Registration for this course is by advisement. 
E. W. Haas and faculty. 

Emphasis is placed on the study of the health 
needs of childbearing women, their children, 
and families. Family influences, social trends, 
and normal development are integrated through- 
out the semester. The concept of nurturance for 
the promotion of optimum health provides the 
framework for nursing intervention. Experiences 
are provided in teaching principles of health 
maintenance to families in a variety of settings. 



155 Nursing in Long-term Illness Spring 
Prerequisite: Nursing 153. Credit: six hours, 
theory; five hours, clinical laboratory. B. H. 
Rosner and faculty. 

Stresses concepts and skills of therapeutic 
intervention with adults who have psychosocial 
and physiological dysfunction. Students develop 
nurse-patient relationships with adults in 
psychiatric, rehabilitation, and home settings. 
Introduction to group process is included 
theoretically and clinically. 

160 Interpersonal Processes in Nursing Fall. 

Credit one hour. Prerequisite: psychology, three 
credits; sociology, three credits. L Schwager. 

Concepts of behavior, anxiety, socialization, 
and grief are studied in the context of the 
nurse-patient relationship. Emphasis is on 
principles of communication and interviewing. 
The content is prerequisite to subsequent 
nursing courses. 

250 Transition to Nursing Practice Spring. 
Credit: five hours, theory; seven hours, clinical 
laboratory. Prerequisites: Nursing 153. 154, 155. 
J. B. Dorie and faculty. 

Offers the student the opportunity to care for a 
group of individuals with a variety of health 
care needs including oncological conditions. 
Within these groups the student will assist 
individuals and/or families to achieve the 
optimal degree of health through the develop- 
ment of goals that incorporate their evolving 
needs. The student will have the opportunity 
to apply leadership principles in the manage- 
ment of patient care through participation with 
health care workers in a variety of settings. 

256 Community Health: Care of Patients with 
Environmentally Related Health Problems 

Fall. Credit: five hours, theory; five hours, clinical 
laboratory. Prerequisites: Nursing 156, 157. 
J. A. Keith and faculty. 



24 Description of Courses 



Focus is on the prevention and control of 
selected community health problems; e.g., 
cerebral vascular accident, venereal disease, 
tuberculosis, mental illness, and social prob- 
lems such as addiction. The modality of 
nursing care will be both individual (thera- 
peutic nurse-patient relationship) and group 
(family) in acute psychiatric hospital settings 
and the community. The common denominator 
utilized in teaching the selected community 
health problems will be the epidemiological 
approach. Experience is also provided for stu- 
dents to have on-going observations and 
participation in the dynamics of group process. 



Morphological and functional study of the 
nervous system in man with special reference to 
interference of normal pathways. Neurone 
physiology, neuroanatomy, receptor physiology, 
neural pathways as a basis for integrative 
activity, and neuromuscular relationships are 
included. Degenerative processes in basic 
tissues will also be explored. Selected dis- 
turbances that occur in man will be correlated 
with clinical nursing. 

133 Biological Science Fall. Credit three 
hours. Registration is by advisement and with 
permission from the instructor. V. Stolar. 



257 Dimensions of Nursing Spring. Credit: 
four hours, theory; eight hours, clinical labo- 
ratory. Prerequisites: Nursing 156, 157, 256. 
E. K. Herrmann and faculty. 

Consideration of various aspects of professional 
nurse practice: caring for patients with acute 
medical-surgical illnesses who have multiple 
and complex nursing needs; having responsi- 
bility for nursing care of groups of patients; 
and participating in the leadership activities 
related to nursing care. A variety of hospital 
and community settings will be utilized for 
clinical practice. 

Professionally Related Courses 

130 Biological Science Fall. Credit four 
hours. Registration is by advisement and with 
permission from the instructor. R. S. Rubenstein. 

An introductory course designed to identify 
fundamental concepts of structure and function 
in the human organism. Selected underlying 
anatomical and physiological disturbances that 
occur in man will be correlated with the clinical 
nursing course 153. Biochemical principles of 
metabolism, electrolytes, and acid-base balance 
are integrated. 

131-134 Biological Science Fall and spring. 
Credit three hours. Prerequisite: Biological 
Science 130 or 133. Offered concurrent to 
Nursing 154-157. R. S. Rubenstein. 

The reproductive cycle in man will be studied. 
Principles of heredity, general embryology, and 
medical genetics will be covered. There will be 
a survey of the microorganisms detrimental to 
man, designed to acquaint the student with 
communicable diseases that are endemic to 
society. Principles of immunity will be included. 
The correlation between disease patterns and 
social climate will be identified. 

132-136 Biological Science Fall and spring. 
Credit three hours. Prerequisite: Biological 
Science 130 or 133. Offered concurrent to 
Nursing 155 and Nursing 256. V. Stolar. 



An introduction to the properties and physio- 
logical processes common to all animals. 
Protoplasmic organization, membrane char- 
acteristics, energetics, control systems, and cell 
division will be covered. The cardio-vascular- 
pulmonary and gastrointestinal systems will be 
studied. Emphasis will be placed on interference 
of normal function, mechanisms of compensa- 
tion, tissue change, and sequelae. Hormones 
will be surveyed to understand their control of 
biological processes. 

140 Pharmacology Spring. Credit two hours. 
Prerequisites: Registration for this course is by 
advisement. It is open to students who have 
completed Nursing 153-156, 154-157 or their 
equivalent. A. Drakontides. 

The emphasis of the course is placed on the 
basic principles of pharmacology. These prin- 
ciples are elaborated in discussions of drugs 
acting on the nervous system, cardiovascular 
drugs, chemotherapy, endocrine pharmacology, 
and drug interactions. 

108 Introduction to Research Spring. Credit 
three hours. J. S. Chapman. 

The student is introduced to the basic skills 
needed for the evaluation of research material — 
critical thinking about situational and written 
data pertinent to nursing, and recognition of 
appropriate use of common statistical concepts. 
Each student develops a scientific proposal 
relevant to professional nursing practice. 

109 Life-span Growth and Development, 
Part I Fall. Credit two hours. E. Werlin. 

Study of the psychophysiological and psycho- 
social factors that produce a range of human 
behavior in the life cycle from adolescent years 
through aging years. The focus will be on 
continued development, maturation, and/or 
decline in physical, perceptual, cognitive, moral, 
sexual, personality, and social functioning. 

110 Life-span Growth and Development, 
Part II Spring. Credit two hours. E. Werlin. 



25 Description of Courses 



Study of the psychophysiological and psycho- 
social factors that produce a range of human 
behavior in the life cycle from birth through 
childhood years. The focus will be on physical, 
sensory and perceptual, motor, cognitive and 
language, personality, and social development. 

207 Nursing in the Social Order Spring. 
Credit two hours. E. C. Lambertsen. 

The structure and function of both formal and 
informal social organizations are considered, 
especially as they influence the work of the 
professional nurse in the delivery of health 
services. 



Provision is made for a selected group of 
students in the first year of the nursing major 
to register for Spanish. The course assists 
the person already familiar with Spanish to 
develop skills in conversation as it relates to 
professional practice in the New York City 
community. There is a special charge for this 
course. Enrollment limited. 

Independent Study Students undertake self- 
directed systematic study in an area of interest 
under the preceptorship of a faculty member. 
Proposals must have the approval of the 
Committee for Independent Study. This ex- 
perience is planned for the January intersession. 



246 Public Health 

M. P. Cunningham. 



Fall. Credit two hours. 



A study of community health needs and designs 
for meeting these needs. Programs and 
organizations participating in the formal and 
informal community health structure will be 
examined using an epidemiologic framework. 

Spanish for Professional Workers Spring 

Credit two hours. Prerequisites: basic Spanish 
vocabulary and conversational ability. Faculty 
to be appointed. 



Guided Study This course offers to qualified 
students the opportunity for guided study and 
course visitation under the direction of a faculty 
member. It permits participation in classes, 
seminars, conferences, library research, and 
selected nursing service programs. Offered 
within the regular term date. No credit or grade 
is given but a record of achievement is filed 
in the student record. A special fee is estab- 
lished after consultation with the dean's office. 
Request for attendance is filed in the registrar's 
office and referred to the dean. 



Cornell University 






Register 



University Administration 

Dale R. Corson, President of the University 

David C. Knapp, University Provost 

Mark Barlow, Jr., Vice Provost 

W. Donald Cooke, Vice President for Research 

William D. Gurowitz, Vice President for 

Campus Affairs 
Robert T. Horn, Vice President and Chief 

Investment Officer 
Samuel A. Lawrence, Vice President for 

Administration 
E. Hugh Luckey, Vice President for Medical 

Affairs 
Paul L. McKeegan, Vice Provost 
Arthur H. Peterson, University Treasurer and 

Chief Fiscal Officer 
Richard M. Ramin, Vice President for Public 

Affairs 
Robert F. Risley, Vice Provost 
Neal R. Stamp, University Counsel and 

Secretary of the Corporation 



John Watson, Associate Director, Financial 

Services 
Cosmo J. LaCosta, Assistant Director 

Joint Administrative Board 

Representatives from the Board of Trustees 
of Cornell University 

Dale R. Corson, Chairman 1974 
Arthur H. Dean 
Robert W. Purcell 
Harold D. Uris 

Representatives from the Board of Governors 
of the Society of the New York Hospital 

Kenneth H. Hannan, Chairman 1975 
Stanley de J. Osborne 
Frederick K. Trask, Jr. 
John Hay Whitney 

Members at Large 



The New York Hospital-Cornell 
Medical Center Administration 

E. Hugh Luckey, M.D., President 

Charles H. Dick, Vice President for Public 

Affairs 
Roger H. Sheldon, Vice President for Planning 

The New York Hospital Administration 

David D. Thompson, M.D., Director 

H. Henry Bertram, Associate Director, Personnel 

Services 
Susan T. Carver, M.D., Associate Director, 

Professional Services 
Richard J. Olds, Associate Director, Engineering 

and General Services 
Melville A. Piatt, M.D., Associate Director, 

Professional Services 
H. Mefford Runyon, Associate Director, 

Corporate Affairs 



E. Roland Harriman 
Walter B. Wriston 

Ex Officio Member 

E. Hugh Luckey, M.D. 

Officers of the School 

Dale R. Corson. Ph.D., President of the 

University 
David C. Knapp, Ph.D., Provost of the University 
Eleanor C. Lambertsen, Ed.D., D.Sc. (Hon.), 

R.N., Dean of the School of Nursing and 

Professor of Nursing 
Muriel R. Carbery, M.S., R.N., Associate Dean 

and Professor of Nursing 
Louise S. Hazeltine, M.A., R.N., Associate Dean 
Nina T. Argondizzo, M.A., R.N., Assistant Dean 

and Assistant Professor of Nursing 
Gloria E. Wilson, M.A., R.N., Assistant Dean and 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 



28 Register 



Faculty and Staff 

Administration 

Eleanor C. Lambertsen, Ed.D., D.Sc. (Hon.), 

R.N., Dean of the School of Nursing and 

Professor of Nursing 
Louise S. Hazeltine, M.A., R.N., Associate Dean 
Muriel R. Carbery, M.S., R.N., Associate Dean 

and Professor of Nursing 
Nina T. Argondizzo, M.A., R.N., Assistant Dean 

and Assistant Professor of Nursing 
Gloria E. Wilson, M.A., R.N., Assistant Dean 

and Assistant Professor of Nursing 
Meimi Joki, A.B., Assistant to the Dean 
Edna Johnson, Director of Student Relations 
Judith A. Court, M.A., Director of Admissions 

Undergraduate Faculty 

Eddie Mae Barnes, B.S., R.N., Instructor in 

Nursing; Director of Nursing, Payne Whitney 

Psychiatric Clinic 
Helen M. Berg, Ed.D., R.N., Associate Professor 

of Nursing; Department Head of Medical 

Nursing 
Marie Boguslawski, M.S.N., R.N., Assistant 

Professor of Nursing 
Marion Peters Braxton, M.P.H., R.N., Assistant 

Professor of Nursing 
Muriel R. Carbery, M.S., R.N., Professor of 

Nursing 
Francesca Castronovo, M.A., R.N., Assistant 

Professor of Nursing 
Jacqueline Sue Chapman, M.S.N., R.N., Assistant 

Professor of Nursing 
Margaret Cotterell, M.A., R.N., Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Nursing 
Sister Catherine M. Cummings, M.S.N., R.N., 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 
Marion Phyllis Cunningham, M.S., R.N., 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 
Helen Demitroff, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor 

of Nursing 
Alice DonDero, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor 

of Nursing; Department Head of Pediatric 

Nursing 
Jeanne B. Dorie, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor 

of Nursing 
Anna Drakontides, Ph.D., Associate Professor 

of Pharmacology 
Dorothy Ellison, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor 

of Nursing; Department Head of Operating 

Room Nursing 
I. Darlene Erlander, M.A., R.D., Assistant 

Professor of Nutrition 
Carol Fox, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 
Ann K. Galligan, M.S., R.N., Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Nursing 
Elenora Haas, M.S., R.N., C.N.M., Assistant 

Professor of Nursing 
Eleanor Krohn Herrmann, M.S., R.N., Assistant 

Professor of Nursing 



Maryann Johnston, M.Ed., R.N., Instructor in 

Nursing 
Bonnie L. Jones, M.S., R.N., Assistant Professor 

of Nursing 
Jo Ann Keith, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of 

Nursing 
Jean Kijek, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 
Katherine A. Knight, M.Ed., R.N., Assistant 

Professor of Nursing 
Patricia A. Kosten, M.Ed., R.N., Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Nursing 
Eleanor C. Lambertsen, Ed.D., D.Sc. (Hon.), 

R.N., Professor of Nursing; Dean of the 

School of Nursing 
Mariamma K. Mathai, M.Ed., R.N., Instructor in 

Nursing 
Helen M. McDowell, M.A., R.N., Assistant 

Professor of Nursing 
Martha A. McNiff, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor 

of Nursing 
Marjorie A. Miller, M.S., R.N., Associate Pro- 
fessor of Nursing 
Agnes Morgan, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor 

of Nursing 
*Janet Nielson Natapoff, M.S., R.N., Assistant 

Professor of Nursing 
Deanna R. Pearlmutter, Ed.D., R.N., Associate 

Professor of Nursing 
Bernice Horner-Rosner, M.S.N., R.N., Assistant 

Professor of Nursing 
Reva Scharf Rubenstein, Ph.D., Associate 

Professor of Science 
Lois Schwager, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor 

of Nursing 
Laura L. Simms, Ed.D., R.N., Associate Pro- 
fessor of Nursing; Department Head of 

Surgical Nursing 
Elizabeth D. Ivey Smith, M.A., R.N., Assistant 

Professor of Nursing 
Evelyn G. Sobol, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor 

of Nursing 
Vera Stolar, M.S., R.N., Assistant Professor of 

Science 
Marie D. Strickland, M.Ed., R.N., Assistant 

Professor of Nursing; Department Head of 

Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing 
Madeleine S. Sugimoto, M.Ed., M.A., R.N., 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 
Susan Tollett, M.S., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 
Edna E. Tuffley, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor 

of Nursing; Department Head, Baker Pavilion 

Nursing Service 
Carolyn E. Wagner, M.A., R.N., Instructor in 

Nursing; Department Head of Outpatient 

Nursing 
Eloise Werlin, M.S., R.N., Assistant Professor 

of Nursing 
Rita Reis Wieczorek, M.A., R.N., Assistant 

Professor of Nursing 
Gloria E. Wilson, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor 

of Nursing; Assistant Dean 

* Leave of absence 1974-1975 



29 Register 



Continuing Education Faculty 

Nina T. Argondizzo, M.A., R.N., Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Nursing; Assistant Dean 
Eddie Mae Barnes, B.S., R.N., Instructor in 

Nursing; Director of Nursing, Payne Whitney 

Psychiatric Clinic 
Mary Bartlett, M.S., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 
Louise Battista, M.A., R.N., Instructor in 

Nursing 
Helen M. Berg, Ed.D., R.N., Associate Professor 

of Nursing; Department Head of Medical 

Nursing 
Mary T. Bielski, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor 

of Nursing 
Patricia Boos, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Instruction 
Barbara Boyce, M.A., R.N., Instructor in 

Nursing 
Grace E. Brown, M.A., R.N., Instructor in 

Nursing 
Muriel R. Carbery, M.S., R.N., Professor of 

Nursing; Associate Dean 
Amy Chou, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 
Elaine Crimmins, M.A., R.N., Instructor in 

Nursing 
Edna Danielsen, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor 

of Nursing 
Virginia C. Dericks, M.A., R.N., Assistant 

Professor of Nursing 
Alice DonDero, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor 

of Nursing; Department Head of Pediatric 

Nursing 
Dorothy Ellison, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor 

of Nursing; Department Head of Operating 

Room Nursing 
Susan Feldman, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 
Joanne Foster, M.A., R.N., Administrative 

Liaison, Assistant Director of Nursing Service 
Geraldine K. Glass, M.A., R.N., Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Nursing 
Alene Haas, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 
Christina L. Haas, M.A., R.N., Instructor in 

Nursing 
Alice Hugo, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of 

Nursing 
Patricia Jones, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 
Helen King, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 
Eleanor C. Lambertsen, Ed.D., D.Sc. (Hon.), 

R.N., Professor of Nursing; Dean of the 

School of Nursing 
Martha Leonard, M.N., R.N., Instructor in 

Nursing 
Emelia Luddy, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 
Margery Manly, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 
Marjorie A. Miller, M.S., R.N., Associate Pro- 
fessor of Nursing 
Grace Moroukian, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor 

of Nursing 
Diana Newman, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 
Margaret J. O'Brien, M.A., M.P.H., R.N., Adjunct 

Assistant Professor 
Patricia M. O'Regan, M.A., R.N., Instructor in 

Nursing 
Madeline Petrillo, M.Ed., R.N., Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Nursing 



Eva M. Reese, M.S., R.N., Adjunct Assistant 
Professor 

Lena J. Saffioti, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor 
of Nursing 

Adele Schlosser, M.P.H., R.N., Adjunct Assistant 
Professor 

Doris Schwartz, M.A., R.N., Associate Pro- 
fessor of Nursing 

Laura L. Simms, Ed.D., R.N., Associate Pro- 
fessor of Nursing; Department Head of 
Surgical Nursing 

Marie D. Strickland, M.Ed., R.N., Assistant 
Professor of Nursing; Department Head of 
Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing 

Carolyn E. Wagner, M.A., R.N., Instructor in 
Nursing; Department Head of Outpatient 
Nursing 

Mamie Kwoh Wang, M.A., R.N., Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Nursing 

Margie Warren, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor 
of Nursing 

Emeritus Professors 

Virginia M. Dunbar, M.A., R.N., Professor 

Emeritus of Nursing and Dean Emeritus 
Verda F. Hickox, M.A., R.N., Professor Emeritus 

of Nursing 
Mary Klein, M.A., R.N., Professor Emeritus of 

Nursing 
Margery T. Overholser, M.A., R.N., Professor 

Emeritus of Nursing 
Bessie A. R. Parker, B.S., R.N., Professor 

Emeritus of Nursing 
Veronica Lyons Roehner, M.A., R.N., Professor 

Emeritus of Nursing 
Henderika J. Rynbergen, M.S., Professor 

Emeritus of Science 
Agnes Schubert, M.S., R.N., Professor Emeritus 

of Nursing 

Class of 1975 

The name of the student is followed by his or 
her home address. The college or university 
from which the student transferred is given in 
parentheses. 

Program I 

Anselmo, Jeanne, Bayside, New York (Hunter 

College) 
Appleton, Roselle, Englewood, New Jersey 

(New York University) 

Bane, Merel, New York, New York (State 

University at New Paltz) 
Banfield, Nancy, Van Etten, New York (State 

University at Geneseo) 
Berger, Barbara, Fort Lee, New Jersey (Elmira 

College) 
Bockeloh, Roberta, Rye, New York (Ohio 

Wesleyan University) 



30 Register 



Bonomo, Barbara, Brooklyn, New York (Wagner 

College) 
Braunstein, Janet, Bay Shore, New York 

(Newton College) 
Brodsky, Michele, New Rochelle, New York 

(Cornell University) 

Christensen, Janet, Maywood, New Jersey 

(Houghton College) 
Coleman, Mary, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 

(Ursinus College) 
Connors, Elaine, Farmingdale, New York 

(Harriman College) 
Cook, Lois, Briarcliff Manor, New York 

(The King's College) 

Day, Carolyn, Carmel, New York (Albright 

College) 
DeCuir, Sydnee, Pt. Pleasant Beach, New Jersey 

(Rutgers) 
DeJoseph, Gloria, Jackson Heights, New York 

(St. John's University) 
Devlin, Patricia, Bayside, New York 

(Queens College) 
Diethelm, Linda, Birmingham, Alabama (Pine 

Manor Junior College) 

Fricke, Kathryn, Darien, Connecticut (Elmira 
College) 

Gavin, Patricia, Hicksville, New York (Nassau 

Community College) 
Gottlieb, Miriam, Middletown, New York (Ithaca 

College) 
Graves, Barbara, Winchester, Massachusetts 

(Wellesley College) 
Gulick, Leslie, Potsdam, New York (State 

University at Potsdam) 

Hampson, Margot, Brooklyn, New York 

(Immaculata College) 
Hart, Brenda, Jamaica, New York (Cornell 

University) 
Heidrich, George, Ann Arbor, Michigan (Eastern 

Michigan University) 
Hoogerhyde, Carol, North Haledon, New Jersey 

(William Patterson College) 
Horan, Eileen, Bronx, New York (Hunter College) 
Hubbell, Jane, Chappequa, New York 

(Pasadena City College) 

Jamison, Deborah, South Burlington, Vermont 

(University of Vermont) 
Janas, Ann Marie, Flushing, New York 

(Marymount College, Tarrytown) 

Kikuchi, Janice, New York, New York (Cornell 

University) 
Kliewer, Jody, Corvallis, Oregon (Boston 

University) 
Koester, Nancy, Long Island City, New York 

(Queens College) 

Liszauer, Susan, Montreal, Quebec (McGill 
University) 



Lukens, Jan, Montpelier, Vermont (Cornell 

University) 
Lundy, Carolyn, Purdys, New York (Marist 

College) 

McDermott, Monica, Queens Village, New York 

(Nassau Community College) 
McGuinness, Kathleen, Putnam Valley, New York 

(Mount St. Mary College) 
McNamara, Maureen, New York, New York 

(State University at Binghamton) 
Maddi, Linda, Bronx, New York (Fordham 

University) 
Marsland, Patricia, McLean, Virginia (Cornell 

University) 
Mart, Susan, Piscataway, New Jersey 

(Alderson-Broaddus College) 
Mullen, Mariquita, Washington, D. C. 

(American University) 

Naevestad, Carol, Fanwood, New Jersey 

(Houghton College) 
Nissley, Patricia, Highland Park, New Jersey 

(Douglass College) 
Novendstern, Gina, New York, New York 

(New York University) 

Patrone, Lucille, Brooklyn, New York 

(St. Francis College) 
Penny, Sharon, Valley Stream, New York 

(Hofstra University) 
Pfeifer, Carmel, Brooklyn, New York (Fordham 

University) 
Presutti, Michael, Belmont, New York (Cornell 

University) 

Riedesel, Christine, Akron, New York (State 

University at Buffalo) 
Rosenkrantz, Melinda, Livingston, New Jersey 

(Douglass College) 

St. John, Elizabeth, Babylon, New York 

(Cornell University) 
Schlachter, Joanne, Jackson Heights, New York 

(State University at Albany) 
Schreier, Audrey, Spring Valley, New York 

(Rockland Community College) 
Sherard, Lynn, Oakdale, New York (Elmira 

College) 
Skarie, Elizabeth, Spencer, West Virginia 

(University of Minneapolis) 
Smith, Pamela, Fair Lawn, New Jersey (Houghton 

College) 
Smith, Susan, Darien, Connecticut 

(Connecticut College) 
Steiner, Linda, Glendale, New York (Fordham 

University) 
Strohl, Roberta, Passaic, New Jersey (Fairleigh 

Dickinson University) 

Terpstra, Myrna, Newton, Iowa (Calvin College) 

Uzenoff, Barbara, Clark's Summit, Pennsylvania 
(Keystone Junior College) 



31 Register 



Wisnewski, Clare, Bronx, New York (Fordham 
University) 

Program II 

Asckenasy, Joan, New York, New York 
(Brandeis University) 

Benson, Carolyn, Santa Barbara, California 

(George Washington University) 
Bernsley, Lenore, Garden City, New York 

(Boston University) 
Brett, Susan, Forest Hills, New York (Cornell 

University) 
Brown, Katheryne, Stamford, Connecticut 

(Connecticut College) 
Burns, Elizabeth, Villanova, Pennsylvania 

(Smith College) 

Christensen, Kathleen, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

(George Washington University) 
Cinnamon, Carol, New York, New York (Yeshiva 

University) 
Clucas, Aileen, Menlo Park, California (San 

Francisco City College) 
Codington, Julia, Clinton, South Carolina 

(Agnes Scott College) 
Conway, Linda, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

(George Washington University) 
Curry, Mary, Hillsdale, New Jersey (Trinity 

College) 

Dorman, Priscilla, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 
(Smith College) 

Edell, Sara, New York, New York (City College) 
Ether, Elise, Saratoga, New York (Houghton 
College) 

Funk, Marjorie, Bristol, Connecticut (Wheaton 
College) 

Gauquie, Margaret, Newburgh, New York 

(Syracuse University) 
Goldman, Shelley, Jamaica, New York (State 

University at Stony Brook) 
Guzman, Lani, New York, New York (Brown 

University) 

Heidrich, Susan. Ann Arbor, Michigan 

(Eastern Michigan University) 
Humphreys, Paget, Grosse Pointe, Michigan 

(Goucher College) 

Klapper, Jonni, Far Rockaway, New York 
(Cornell University) 

Langan, Rebecca, Leawood, Kansas (University 

of Kansas) 
Leach, Laurel, Melrose, Massachusetts (Tufts 

University) 
Lonergan, Kathleen, W. Roxbury, Massachusetts 

(Tufts University) 



Mazlen, Anne, New York, New York 

(City University of New York) 
Mongan, Kathleen, Manchester, New Hampshire 

(Boston College) 

Needy, Carolyn, Fishkill, New York (Middlebury 

College) 
Neleber, Robin, Manchester, Connecticut 

(Mt. Holyoke College) 

Obedzinski, Marilyn, Syracuse, New York 

(Mt. Holyoke College) 
Oken, Stephanie, Palisades Park, New Jersey 

(George Washington University) 
Orlic, Susan, New York, New York (Brown 

University) 
Orlinoff, Sheila, Akron, Ohio (Case Western 

Reserve University) 

Pittman, Barbara, New York, New York (City 
College) 

Raikes, Mary Jo, Ashland, Nebraska (Grinnell 

College) 
Robinovitz, Elaine, Bayside, New York (Queens 

College) 
Rogers, Lydia, Melrose, Massachusetts 

(University of Wisconsin) 

Sanderson, Vickie, Bronx, New York (Hunter 

College) 
Sauda, Jean, Syracuse, New York (University 

of Michigan) 
Senie, Ruby, Dalton, Massachusetts (Queens 

College) 
Shaffer, Ava, Rockville, New York (Cornell 

University) 
Stilson, Sarah, New Haven, Connecticut 

(Wellesley College) 
Stone, Dorothy, New York, New York (Columbia 

University) 
Stryker, Jane, San Antonio, Texas (University of 

Illinois) 

Troy, Janet, Brooklyn, New York (Fordham 
University) 

Valjaots, Linda, Huntington Station, New York 
(State University at Binghamton) 

Walsh, Nancy, Drexel Hill, Pennsylvania 

(Fordham University) 
Wexler, Karen, Lexington, Massachusetts 

(Northwestern University) 
Wiltse, Margaret, Cincinnati, Ohio (Bryn Mawr 

College) 
Winston, Carmen, New York, New York 

(Clarion State College) 
Woltersdorf, Nora, New York, New York 

(Hunter College) 
Wyman, Susan, New York, New York (New York 

University) 




* w .~ 




w ■ - 




f 







<* 



Cornell University 



ndex 



Academic Calendar, 2 

Academic standing, 12 

Acceptance, dates of, 11; fee, 15 

Accreditation, 8 

Administration, University, 27; School, 28 

Admission, 11; general requirements, 11; 

Program I, 11; Program II, 11 
Applications, 11; dates for filing, 11; fee, 15; 

requests for, 35 
Armed Forces programs, 18 
Army Nurse Program, 18 
Assistance, financial, 15-18 
Bills, payment of, 15 
Biological science courses, 24 
Calendar, 2 

Care of the Adult Patient, 23 
Class of 1975, 29 
Clinical facilities, 21 
College Scholarship Service, 15 
Community Health, 23 
Continuing Education, Division of, 20 
Cornell Medical Center, 27; Joint Board, 27 
Cornell University administration, 27 
Counseling services, 20 
Courses, plan for Program I, 10; plan for 

Program II, 10; course descriptions, 23 
Dean's List, 12 

Degree, requirements, 14; with distinction, 14 
Department of Health, 20 
Dimensions of Nursing, 24 
Dismissal, 14 

Division of Continuing Education, 20 
Expenses, 14 
Facilities, clinical, 21; for instruction, 20; 

housing, 14; recreational, 20 
Faculty, administration, 28; continuing 

education, 29; emeritus, 29; under- 
graduate, 28 
Fees, 15 
Financial assistance, 15; application for, 17; 

dates for administering, 12 
Foundations of nursing, 23 
Government, School, 18 
Grades, 12 
Grants, 17-18 
Guided Study, 25 
Health services, 20 
History of School, 7 
Honor society, 14 
Housing, costs, 14; regulations, 18 



Independent Study, 25 

Information, request for, 35; visit for, 12 

Interpersonal Processes in Nursing, 23 

Introduction to Nursing, 23 

Introduction to Research, 24 

Instruction facilities, 20 

Instructors, 28-29 

Joint Administration Board, 27 

Library, 21 

Life-span Growth and Development, 24 

Living out, 18 

Loans, 17-18 

Maternal-Child Nursing, 23 

Navy Nurse Program, 18 

New York Hospital, 7; administration, 27; 

facilities for instruction, 20 
Nursing courses, 23 
Nursing in Long-term Illness, 23 
Nursing in the Social Order, 25 
Nursing major, 8 
Objectives, 8 
Pharmacology, 24 
Philosophy, 8 
Professors, emeritus, 29 
Program I, 10 
Program II, 10 
Public Health, course, 25 
Recreational facilities. 20 
Refunds, 15 
Regents awards, 18 
Register, 27 

Registration, late fee, 15; state, 14 
Reinstatement fee, 15 
Requirements, general, 10; degree. 14 
Research. Introduction to, 24 
Scholar Incentive Program, 15, 18 
Scholarships, 17-18 
Sigma Theta Tau, 14 
Social Order, Nursing in the, 25 
Social science courses, 24 
Spanish for Professional Workers, 25 
State registration for graduates, 14 
Students, 29 
Transfer fee, 14 

Transition to Nursing Practice, 23 
Tuition, 14 

Undergraduate program, 8 
Visiting nurse, 20 
Visits to the School, 11 
Withdrawal, 14; refund for, 15 



Further Information and Application 
Undergraduate Program 

It is important that persons interested in 
pursuing one of the programs at the School of 
Nursing make plans well in advance so that 
their college programs may be arranged to 
provide the necessary background. 

To receive assistance in such planning, an 
interested student should fill out the form 
on this page and send it to 

Admissions 

Cornell University-New York Hospital School of 

Nursing 
1320 York Avenue 
New York, New York 10021. 

(The writer should include a zip code.) 



Request Form 

□ I wish to receive further information. Please 
place my name on your mailing list. 

□ I wish to apply for admission in September, 



year 

Please send me an application blank for 

□ Program I (after two years of college) 

□ Program II (after four years of college) 



street address 



city 



state 



zip 



date of birth 



name of high school 



address 



date high school diploma received 



name of college 



address 



dates of college attendance 



List of Announcements 

Following is a list of Announcements 
published by Cornell University to provide 
information on programs, faculty, facilities, 
curricula, and courses of the various 
academic units. 

Agriculture and Life Sciences at Cornell 
New York State College of Agriculture and 

Life Sciences: Courses 
College of Architecture, Art, and Planning 
College of Arts and Sciences 
Department of Asian Studies 
Graduate School of Business and Public 

Administration 
Field of Education (Graduate) 
College of Engineering 
Engineering at Cornell 
Graduate Study in Engineering and Applied 

Sciences 
General Information* 
Graduate School 

Graduate School: Course Descriptions 
School of Hotel Administration 
New York State College of Human Ecology 
New York State School of Industrial and Labor 

Relations 
Law School 

Medical College (New York City) 
Graduate School of Medical Sciences 

(New York City) 
Cornell University — New York Hospital 

School of Nursing (New York City) 
Graduate School of Nutrition 
Officer Education (ROTC) 
Summer Session 
New York State Veterinary College 

* The Announcement of General Information 
is designed to give prospective students 
pertinent information about all aspects and 
academic units of the University. 

Requests for the publications listed above should 
be addressed to 

Cornell University Announcements 
Edmund Ezra Day Hall 
Ithaca, New York 14850. 

(The writer should include a zip code.) 



Office of University Publications 
474 11. 5M HU 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY-NEW YORK HOSPITAL SCHOOL OF NURSING 



SUBJECT: Admission Requirements to the Nursing Program 
for the Class of 1977. 



All students entering the generic nursing program in 
September 1975 will be required to have a bacca- 
laureate degree in another discipline, from a college 
or university accredited by one of the regional 
associations of colleges and secondary schools. 

Applicants must meet the admission requirements for 
Program II as stated in the 1974-1975 School 
Announcement . 



Eleanor C. Lambertsen, Dean 
May, 1974 



ECL:gm 




[nrf*(.a>*ytsfU 





lornell University Announcements 




O 3 



Cornell University- 
New York Hospital 
School of Nursing 



jNY PERSON 
AN FIND 
AUCTION 
< ANY STUDY 



Cornell University 



Cornell University- 
New York Hospital 
School of Nursing 
515 East 71 Street 
New York, New York 10021 
1975-76 



Cornell University Announcements 

Volume 67 of the Cornell University 
Announcements consists of twenty-two 
catalogs, of which this is number 8 dated 
May 12, 1975. Publication dates: twenty-two 
times a year (four times in August; three times 
in January and March; twice in June, July, 
September, and November; once in April, May, 
October, and December). Publisher: Cornell 
University, Sheldon Court, 420 College Avenue, 
Ithaca, New York 14853. Second-class postage 
paid at Ithaca, New York. 



Academic Calendar 



1975-1976 



Orientation, Class of 1977, begins 1:00 p.m. 

Orientation, Class of 1977, ends 1:00 p.m. 

Registration 

Labor Day holiday 

Fall term instruction begins, all classes 8:00 a.m. 

School holiday 

Midsemester grades due, 5:00 p.m. (Class 
of 1976) 

Progress grades due, 5:00 p.m. (Class of 1977) 

Instruction suspended, 1:00 p.m. 

Thanksgiving recess 

Instruction resumed, 7:30 a.m. 

Fall term instruction ends, 5:00 p.m. 

Study period 

Final examinations and clinical evaluation begin, 
9:00 a.m. 

Final examinations and clinical evaluation end, 
5:00 p.m. 

Christmas recess and intersession 

Registration, new and rejoining students 

Registration, continuing students 

Spring term instruction, all classes, begins 
8:00 a.m. 



Wednesday, August 27 
Friday, August 29 
Friday, August 29 
Monday, September 1 
Tuesday, September 2 
Monday, October 13 

Friday, October 24 
Friday, November 14 
Wednesday, November 26 

Monday, December 1 
Friday, December 12 



Tuesday, December 16 
Friday, December 19 

Thursday, January 29 
Friday, January 30 

Monday, February 2 



Spring recess 

Instruction resumed, 7:30 a.m. 

Midsemester grades due, 5:00 p.m. 

Spring term instruction ends, 5:00 p.m. 

Final examinations and clinical evaluation begin, 
1:00 p.m. 

Final examinations and clinical evaluation end, 
5:00 p.m. 

Convocation and Commencement 



Saturday, March 20 
Monday, March 29 
Wednesday, March 31 
Friday, May 14 

Monday, May 17 

Thursday, May 20 
Wednesday, May 26 



The dates shown in the Academic Calendar 
are subject to change at any time by official 
action of Cornell University. 

In enacting this calendar, the University Senate 
has scheduled classes on religious holidays. 
It is the intent of Senate legislation that stu- 
dents missing classes due to the observance 
of religious holidays be given ample oppor- 
tunity to make up work. 




) 



V 




Announcements 



Contents 



2 Academic Calendar 

7 History of the School 

8 Accreditation 

8 The Undergraduate Program 

12 Admission 

15 Grades and Academic Standing 

16 Degree Requirements 

17 State Registration for Graduates 

17 Expenses 

18 Financial Assistance 
20 General Information 

23 Division of Continuing Education 

23 Facilities for Instruction 

25 Description of Courses 

29 Register 

34 Index 

36 Application 

Inside back cover List of Announcements 







1 








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Cornell University 



Cornell University-New York Hospital 
School of Nursing 



History of the School 



The Cornell University-New York Hospital 
School of Nursing was established as a school 
in Cornell University in 1942, on the sixty-fifth 
anniversary of the founding of The New York 
Hospital School of Nursing. One of the earliest 
nursing schools in the country, the School is 
part of The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical 
Center, which includes also the Cornell 
University Medical College and the various 
buildings of The New York Hospital extending 
from Sixty-eighth to Seventy-first Streets on 
the East River. 

The Center is a joint undertaking of the Society 
of the New York Hospital and Cornell 
University, and is committed to a fourfold 
purpose including: (1) care of the sick, pro- 
viding the same wisdom and skill to rich and 
poor; (2) education of doctors and nurses, 
research workers, technicians, and others who 
will work in the field of medical science; (3) 
research to extend the boundaries of knowl- 
edge in the health fields; and (4) the promotion 
of public health through the development of 
preventive medicine. 

The New York Hospital is the second-oldest 
voluntary hospital in this country — its royal 
charter having been granted in 1771 in the 
reign of King George III. The first patients 
were soldiers wounded in the Revolutionary 
War. At that time the Hospital was located on 
the lower end of Manhattan, the only part of 
the city then settled. On early maps the loca- 
tion was designated simply as "the Hospital." 

Cornell University, with its campus in Ithaca, 
New York, received its charter in 1865. Three 
circumstances contributed to the founding of 
the University in the eventful years that 
marked the close of the Civil War. In the first 
place, Ezra Cornell, a citizen of Ithaca, had 
come into a large fortune from his holdings 
in the newly formed Western Union Telegraph 
Company and had devoted much thought to 
the good that might be done by giving his 



wealth to education. A second circumstance 
was the fact that the state of New York had 
received a substantial land grant, under the 
Morrill Act of 1862, for the support of 
colleges teaching agriculture and the 
mechanical arts. The third circumstance was 
that Mr. Cornell had as a colleague in the 
state legislature of 1864-65, a young senator 
named Andrew D. White, later to become the 
first president of the University, who had the 
vision of preserving the state's land grant 
intact for a single great institution which should 
teach not only agriculture and the mechanical 
arts but the humanities and the sciences as 
well. The Medical College, the School of 
Nursing, and the Graduate School of Medical 
Sciences are the divisions of the University 
which are located in New York City. 

The Hospital had been operating for over one 
hundred years before a school for the training 
of nurses was opened. Early steps had been 
taken, however, to improve the care given to 
patients. In 1799 Dr. Valentine Seamen, a 
scholar and prominent physician, had organized 
a series of lectures, combined with a course of 
practical instruction in the wards, for the 
women whom the Hospital had engaged as 
"watchers" and "nurses." Although the 
theoretical content was meager and the 
practical instruction not systematically planned, 
these classes focused attention on the fact 
that women who had some preparation for 
their work gave better care than those with- 
out instruction. When, in 1873, the first training 
school in this country on the Nightingale 
pattern was opened in Bellevue Hospital, the 
Governors of the Society of the New York 
Hospital contributed to its support. Four years 
later, in 1877, when the Hospital moved to 
new buildings, The New York Hospital Training 
School for Nurses was opened in quarters 
which were considered to have all the modern 
improvements of the times. The School moved 
to the present location when the Medical 
Center was opened in 1932. 

Since 1946 all students admitted to the Under- 
graduate Division have been candidates for 
the degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing. 



8 Undergraduate Program 



In 1968, noting a shift in the educational 
background of individuals seeking admission 
to the School, a separate program for college 
graduates was started. Beginning in the fall 
of 1975 all students admitted to the School 
who are not registered nurses will have the 
minimum of a Bachelor's degree in another 
discipline. 

In the fall of 1974, a small group of registered 
nurses from the staff of The New York Hospital 
were admitted to the upper division major to 
study for the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Nursing. 

The Division of Continuing Education was 
organized as an educational unit of the School 
of Nursing in 1971. Although it is a nondegree- 
granting division of the School, it has the 
same status within the structure as the organi- 
zational unit for undergraduate programs lead- 
ing to a degree. 

The Cornell University-New York Hospital 
School of Nursing Alumni Association, 
originally the Alumnae Association of The New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, was organized 
in 1893. It was one of the ten alumnae asso- 
ciations which helped to bring about the 
national professional organization of nurses, 
now known as the American Nurses' Associa- 
tion. In 1945 the Alumni Association became a 
part of the Cornell University Alumni 
Association. 

Accreditation 

The School is accredited by the Department of 
Baccalaureate and Higher Degree Programs 
of the National League for Nursing as a 
generic college program leading to a 
baccalaureate degree. 

The School is registered by the State Educa- 
tion Department, Division of Professional 
Education of the University of the State of 
New York. Cornell University is accredited by 
the Middle States Regional Accreditation 
Association. 

Undergraduate Program 

The Curricula 

The School of Nursing offers an undergraduate 
program for college graduates and registered 
nurses leading to the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Nursing. 

Goals of the University 

The University's basic objective is to produce 
men and women of intellect and to equip them 
to use their abilities wisely. Cornell is not 
solely a place for memorizing data or mastering 



a vocation. It is, instead, a route to intellectual 
maturity, a means for developing the ideas, 
insights, and values which form a permanent 
capacity for intellectual thought and action. 
Cornell students are prepared to use knowl- 
edge well for themselves and society. The 
diversity of Cornell contributes breadth and 
perspective to strong and specialized programs 
of study. 

Philosophy of the School of Nursing 

Education 

Education is a process that helps individuals 
to develop their potential so that they may 
function productively within existing and 
changing social systems. This is a dynamic 
process involving the active participation of 
students and teachers. The school provides the 
environment in which students can test their 
abilities and evaluate their progress. 

The major purposes of the general education 
courses preceding the nursing major are: 
to instill knowledge; to cultivate intellectual 
skills; and to nurture the traits of personality 
and character basic to a reasoned and re- 
sponsible life. Because of the foundation pro- 
vided by these courses, it is anticipated that 
students will be prepared to better under- 
stand themselves, their social and physical 
environment, and the role of the professional 
nurse in society. 

Nursing 

Professional nurses provide a vital, dynamic, 
evolving service within the health care system 
that maintains and promotes the health of 
individuals and groups who are under stress 
of a health-illness nature. They practice inter- 
dependent^ with other health care professionals 
in a variety of health care settings. Profes- 
sional nurses assume responsibility for pro- 
motion of individual and the profession's 
standards of nursing practice. They recognize 
the need to assume an advocacy role on 
behalf of their clients and to speak on com- 
munity and professional issues that are within 
their field of competence. As professional 
people they recognize the need to continue to 
develop personal and professional competence 
through the formal and informal educational 
structures that are best suited to their needs 
and abilities. 

Objectives of the Professional 
Program 

The nursing program aims to produce graduates 
who will: 
1. Use cognitive skills of assessment, decision 
making, and evaluation in diagnostic, 



A 







10 Program of Study 



health maintenance, preventive, restorative, 
and therapeutic measures. 

2. Understand the interaction of the internal 
system of man with his external system 
in a health-illness continuum. 

3. Apply principles of group process in the 
delivery of health care. 

4. Function interdependently with other 
health professionals in the management 
of health care. 

5. Demonstrate characteristics for continuing 
professional development in nursing. 

6. Promote standards of nursing practice 
through assessment of existing practice. 

7. Understand the effect of formal and 
informal structures and the functions of 
health care delivery systems in relation to 
nursing practice. 

8. Contribute to constructive change in 
nursing practice. 

9. Accept individual responsibility and 
accountability for nursing practice. 

10. Utilize practice as a means of gathering 
data for refining and extending nursing 
theory and practice. 

Program of Study 

Organization of Curriculum for the 
College Graduate 

The development of the curriculum reflects two 
components: a structural framework, that 
provides the skeleton for the curriculum and a 
conceptual framework, that provides a unifying 
theme for organizing theoretical content for 
nursing and cognate courses, as well as for 
understanding the process of nursing. 

Structural Framework 

The structural framework of the curriculum 
rests on three major assumptions: 

1. The upper division of a baccalaureate pro- 
gram in nursing provides the specialized 
theoretical knowledge upon which profes- 
sional nursing practice rests. 

2. A clinical experience core provides the 
opportunity to develop proficiency in exercise 
of clinical judgment and skills essential 

to professional nursing practice. 

3. Baccalaureate programs prepare nurses 
who can assume roles (practice) as inter- 
dependent practitioners in a variety of 
health care settings. 

The curriculum, a sixty-credit upper division 
nursing major, consists of nursing and cognate 
courses and a clinical experience core. The 
upper division courses in biological and 
psychosocial sciences focus on the level 
and type of information that is essential to 
provide theoretical understanding of the bio- 
logical and psychosocial functions that reflect 



the adapting human organism. Upper division 
courses in nursing provide an additional 
knowledge base essential for nursing theory 
and practice. 

Throughout the curriculum, and formalized in 
a research course, there is an emphasis 
upon the scientific mode of inquiry. Profes- 
sional practitioners of nursing require more 
than the mastery of a particular body of pro- 
fessional information or a cluster of technical 
skills. They need intellectual leverage for con- 
tinued learning, for modifying practice, and 
for understanding the social forces that facilitate 
or impede their ability to function effectively 
in their personal and professional life. 

Since nursing is an applied science, the 
ability in a given situation to exercise clinical 
judgment and skill is critical. The clinical ex- 
perience core provides the opportunity to 
develop proficiency in the coordination of 
knowledge and skills essential for nursing 
practice. The focus is on nursing functions; on 
assessment and problem-related intervention 
through health counseling, health education, 
preventive, restorative, and therapeutic 
measures. 

Each clinical nursing course is planned so that, 
within the course and within the sequence of 
courses, understanding of and skill in the 
nursing process develop as a continuum. The 
programs are planned so that the student 
moves from the less complex situation to those 
that test his or her ability to provide leader- 
ship in the delivery of nursing care services; 
to function in a collegial relationship with 
other members of the health team; and to 
appreciate the emerging roles of professional 
nurses. 

In the first semester the focus of the nursing 
major is upon the acquisition of skills in 
communication; the nursing process; selected 
technical skills; and study of the basic needs 
common to patients regardless of the nature 
of their health problem. The student then 
progresses to the study of concepts of psycho- 
social needs and problems, and physiological 
alterations of body processes of adult patients 
with representative acute medical-surgical 
health problems. In the courses in the second 
and third semester the student has clinical 
practice experience in the hospital, the home, 
and other community agencies. The content 
of the second semester deals with concepts and 
skills requisite to the health needs of child- 
bearing women, children, and families. Family 
influence, social trends, and normal develop- 
ment are integrated throughout the semester. 
The concept of nurturance for the promo- 
tion of optimum health provides the framework 
for nursing intervention. Experiences are pro- 
vided in teaching principles of health mainte- 
nance to families in a variety of settings. 



Program of Study 11 



In the third semester the focus is upon the 
prevention and control of selected community 
health problems including mental health 
problems. The common denominator used in 
teaching is the epidemiological approach. 
Experience also is provided for the student to 
have ongoing observations and participation 
in the dynamics of group process. 

In the fourth semester the focus is upon caring 
for patients with medical-surgical illnesses 
with multiple and complex nursing needs; 
having responsibility for nursing care of groups 
of patients; and participating in the leader- 
ship activities related to nursing care. 

Pharmacology, nutrition, and diet therapy are 
included within the structure of all of the 
nursing courses of the curriculum. 

Courses in the biological sciences and pro- 
fessionally related social sciences are offered 
concurrently with the nursing courses. Courses 
in the biological and social sciences correlate 
the sequential development of basic con- 
cepts and theories with the requirements of 
the various clinical nursing courses. 

Conceptual Framework 

Content and process are two dimensions central 
to the development of the conceptual frame- 
work. They are complementary components 
which are viewed in the context of a dynamic 
relationship. The approach to the selection of 
content for the curriculum is through the 
delineation of essential concepts. Essential 
concepts are derived from general systems 
theory and the basic sciences. This approach 
provides a structure within which nursing 
knowledge can be synthesized. Likewise, this 
approach allows students and faculty the 
opportunity to test general propositions (infer- 
ences) for validity and reliability within the 
context of selected phenomena in the practice 
setting. The premise is that although a con- 
cept may remain a constant element within the 
curriculum, the theoretical basis for the con- 
cept is constantly being altered through 
additional empirical evidence in nursing practice 
or through advances in science and tech- 
nology. Delineation of these essential con- 
cepts also provides a structure within which 
nursing practice can be analyzed. 

Organization of the Curriculum for the 
Registered Nurse 

The organization of the curriculum of the 
baccalaureate degree program for registered 
nurses (graduates of hospital diploma and 
associate degree programs) is similar to the 
program for college graduates and likewise 
reflects two components: a structural frame- 
work, that provides the skeleton for the 
curriculum, and a conceptual framework, that 



provides a unifying theme for organizing 
theoretical content for nursing and cognate 
courses, as well as for understanding the 
process of nursing. 

Structural Framework 

Candidates who have successfully completed 
the prerequisite admission requirements of 
sixty credits of general education courses; 
successful achievement in the New York State 
College Proficiency Examination, and success- 
ful achievement on the Cornell University- 
New York Hospital School of Nursing Clinical 
Proficiency Examination are considered for 
admission to the program. The assumptions 
for the structural framework of the curriculum 
are similar to those of the curriculum for 
college graduates. 

The curriculum as a thirty point upper division 
nursing major consists of nursing and cognate 
courses and a clinical experience core. In the 
instance of graduate nurse students, the 
assumptions reflect validation of previous 
education and experience in nursing. The upper 
division courses in biological and psycho- 
social sciences focus on the level and type 
of information that is essential to provide 
theoretical understanding of the biological and 
psychosocial functions that reflect the adapt- 
ing human organism. 

Conceptual Framework 

The clinical nursing core, or the study of the 
practice of nursing, in this curriculum will 
focus upon the process of nursing as a system- 
oriented process in the three domains of 
primary, acute and long-term care. The clinical 
experience core provides the structure for 
preparation of interdependent practitioners. 
Associated seminars serve as a mode for ex- 
tending the scope of knowledge and experience 
and for developing professional peer com- 
munication and decision-making skills. 

During the 1975-1976 school year one group of 
the Class of 1976 will be completing the 
requirements for the baccalaureate degree as 
Program I students. These students entered the 
School with sixty college credits and no 
professional education. 

Each student entering the School is expected 
to complete the entire program for which he or 
she is enrolled. To meet the objectives of the 
program, students will have clinical experience 
m a variety of hospital and community settings. 
In order to be eligible for the degree from 
Cornell, the last thirty credits must be taken 
in one of these programs. The faculty reserves 
the right to make changes in the curriculum 
that it believes are in keeping with the chang- 
ing needs of society or the best interests of the 
student and the School. 



12 Admission 



Program Plan-Class of 1976- 
Program I 

Fourth Year 

Fall Semester Hours 

Nursing 154 10 

Public Health 246 2 

Biological Science 131 3 

Elective (optional) 2 



Spring Semester 
Nursing 250 
Social Science 108 
Social Science 207 
Elective (optional) 



Typical Program Plan for 
College Graduates 

(A plan may be made for part time study.) 



First Year 
Fall Semester 
Nursing 156 
Nursing 160 
Biological Science 133 
Social Science 109 



Spring Semester* 
Nursing 157 
Social Science 1 10 
Biological Science 134 
Elective (optional) 



Second Year 
Fall Semester** 
Nursing 256 
Biological Science 136 
Elective (optional) 



Spring Semester 
Nursing 257 
Social Science 108 
Social Science 207 
Elective (optional) 



Hours 

10 
1 
3 
2 

16 



10 

3 

2-4 

15-17 

12 
2 
2 
2 

18 



* Beginning with the Class of 1977 one-half 
of the class will be assigned to this 
sequence of courses in the fall semester 
1976. 
** Beginning with the Class of 1977 one-half 
of the class will be assigned to this 
sequence of courses in the spring semester 
1976. 



Suggested Guide for Planning a 
Program for Registered Nurses 

(This suggestion is based on the assumption 
that registered nurses may be part-time 
students.) 
First Year 

Fall Semester Hours 

Biological Science 133 3 

Social Science 109 2 

Pharmacology* 140 2 

and/or 
Epidemiology* 247 2 



Spring Semester 
Biological Science 136 
Social Science 110 
Social Science** 108 

and/or 
Social Science** 207 



Second Year 

Fall Semester 

Clinical Nursing 365 or 366 

Assessment of Health Status 360 

*Pharmacology 140 or Epidemiology 247 



Spring Semester 

Clinical Nursing 367 

**Social Science 108 or Social Science 207 



7-9 

3 
2 
2 



7-9 



5 
2 
2 

7-9 

5 
2 



5-7 



Admission 

General Requirements 

The number of qualified applicants exceeds the 
number of students that can be admitted to 
the programs of the nursing major each year. 
Applicants selected will be those who, in 
competition with others seeking admission at 
the same time, have demonstrated by their 
qualifications that they are well fitted for the 
nursing profession. 

Evaluation of the candidate's ability to profit 
from the instruction at the School of Nursing is 
based on secondary school and college 
records, the recommendations of school 
authorities, and the results of standardized 
achievement tests; evidence of the candidate's 
ability to make effective use of free time, and 
capacity for leadership and concern for 
others, is given due consideration. Evaluations 
are also made on the basis of extracurricular 
activities, references, and an interview. 
Interviews are granted only to those applicants 
meeting certain minimum admission standards. 
A final disposition on a student's application 
cannot be made unless the student attends a 



tiE^A 




14 Admission 



personal interview at the School of Nursing. 
An extensive medical report is required because 
of the nature of the professional program. 

Students already enrolled in the nursing major 
of another college or university may request 
the evaluation of their college records for 
possible transfer to the School at Cornell. 

It is the policy of Cornell University actively 
to support equality of educational opportunity. 
No student shall be denied admission to the 
University or be discriminated against other- 
wise because of race, color, creed, religion, 
national origin, or sex. 

Specific Requirements for the Baccalaureate 
Degree Program for Registered Nurses 

Registered nurses who are employed by The 
New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center 
and/or have earned a certificate from the 
Division of Continuing Education of the School 
of Nursing may be considered for admission 
to this Program of the nursing major. Each 
applicant must complete a minimum of sixty 
semester hours of general education courses at 
any university, college, or junior college 
accredited by one of the regional associations 
of colleges and secondary schools. Upon 
completion of forty-five semester hours of 
credits, including the required courses in the 
natural and social sciences, applicants may 
register for selected courses in the profes- 
sional major as unclassified students while con- 
currently completing the sixty-credit require- 
ment. 

Applicants to this Program are required to take 
the NLN Pre-Nursing and Guidance Examina- 
tion, The University of the State of New York 
College Proficiency Examinations, Baccalaureate 
Level, in Medical-Surgical Nursing, Psychiatric- 
Mental Health Nursing, and Maternal-Child 
Nursing, and the Cornell University-New York 
Hospital School of Nursing Clinical Proficiency 
Examination. Thirty credits by examination 
will be granted for satisfactory performance in 
the New York State College Proficiency 
Examination and the Cornell University-New 
York Hospital School of Nursing Clinical 
Proficiency Examination. 

The following distribution of general education 
courses is required for admission: 

Communications, 6 credits: composition, public 
speaking, or speech. 

Humanities, 20-30 credits: art, language, 
literature, music, philosophy, religion. No 
credit will be granted for studio humanities 
courses, such as painting, ceramics, voice, etc. 

Natural science and mathematics, 12 credits: 
general biology or an acceptable substitute 
(4 credits) and general chemistry (4 credits) 
are required. Transfer credit will not be granted 
for science courses with an ecological or 



sociological approach or for a "D" grade in 
the natural sciences. 

Social science and history, 12-22 credits: 
sociology (3 credits required), psychology 
(3 credits required), political science, anthro- 
pology, economics, history, geography. Transfer 
credit will not be granted for a "D" grade in 
the required sociology and psychology courses. 

Specific Requirements for the College Graduate 

Persons who hold or are to be awarded a 
baccalaureate degree by an accredited senior 
college or university may be considered for 
admission to this Program of the nursing 
major. Applicants will be required to take the 
Graduate Record Examination. 

The following distribution of courses is required 
for admission to the Program for College 
Graduates 

Humanities, 10 credits. 

Social science, 10 credits: sociology (3 credits 
required), psychology (3 credits required). 
Transfer credit will not be granted for a "D" 
grade in the required sociology and psychology 
courses. 

Natural science and mathematics, 8 credits: 
general biology or an acceptable substitute 
(4 credits) and general chemistry (4 credits) 
are required. Transfer credit will not be granted 
for science courses with an ecological or 
sociological approach or for a "D" grade in 
the natural sciences. 

Applications 

Prospective students should write the Office of 
Admissions, Cornell University-New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, 515 East 71 Street, 
New York, New York 10021, for forms to be 
used in making application for admission. 

Important Dates 

For College Graduates 

The following information and dates apply for 
applicants to the Program for College Graduates. 
Requests for applications may be made any 
time after May 1, 1975 for admission in 
September 1976. 

Admissions applications are due by October 1, 
1975 for early review and by January 1, 1976 
for regular review. Applications will be released 
and accepted after January 1, if places re- 
main to be filled. 

Early review decisions are announced by 
January 1. Though all qualified applicants who 
have completed their applications by October 1 
will be interviewed in the fall, only those 
meeting the criteria for early review will receive 
their admissions decision by January 1. In 



Grades and Academic Standing 15 



addition those applicants who do not qualify 
for the program will be notified once their 
application has been reviewed. Decisions made 
by regular review are announced in March and 
April. Applications submitted after January 1 
will be acted upon as they are completed. 

Each applicant accepted by regular review 
must advise the School of his or her decision 
regarding admission within two weeks of 
acceptance. Upon acceptance, early review 
applicants will be advised of the date their 
decision is due. 

For Registered Nurses 

The following information and dates apply for 
the registered nurse applicants. A preliminary 
application may be filed at any time. (No fee 
is required.) This entitles the applicant to 
advisement relative to planning a program of 
study to meet the general education require- 
ments. The formal application for admission 
should be filed by applicants who have earned 
at least forty-five of the required sixty general 
education credits. 

The application and all accompanying forms 
must be received by May 1 for the fall semester 
and November 1 for the spring semester. 
Applicants will be notified about their admission 
status by July 1 for the fall semester and 
January 1 for the spring semester. 

For All Applicants 

The Financial Assistance Application must be 
filed by February 15. Decisions are announced 
May 1. Offers must be accepted within three 
weeks of receipt. 

Visits to the School 

Members of the staff are available to meet with 
prospective applicants to discuss the School's 
admission requirements, application procedures, 
and the appropriateness of the applicant's 
general education in satisfying the requirements 
for admission. Appointments for these visits 
are required. Prospective applicants are asked 
to call the Admissions Office to schedule an 
appointment. 

An informational visit does not take the place 
of the required interview which is scheduled 
after application materials have been submitted 
and reviewed. 

Grades and Academic Standing 

The Academic Standards Committee, composed 
of faculty representing the two nursing pro- 
grams and the dean or her representative, 
meets at least two times each year to review 
the academic records of students in the School. 
The Committee is responsible for reviewing 



the records of students whose suitability for 
nursing is in question, whose cumulative 
average does not meet minimal standards for 
promotion, whose cumulative average has 
dropped seriously since the previous semester, 
or students whose performance in the major 
nursing course is below the acceptable level 
of achievement. 

The Committee recommends to the faculty the 
promotion of all students and the candidates 
for the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Nursing. The Committee acts on the records of 
those students who qualify for the Dean's List 
and those who are to be considered for 
graduation with distinction. 

The grading system is based on a 4.0 scale 
as follows: 4.0-3.5 (100-90%= A) excellent 
to very good; 3.4-2.5 (89-80% = B) good; 
2.4-1.5 (79-70% =C) satisfactory; 1.4-0.5 
(69-60% =D) below acceptable level; 0.4-0.0 
(Below 60% = F) failing. 

S and U Grades: Final grades of S (satisfactory) 
and U (unsatisfactory) also may be given in 
certain courses and for all clinical laboratory 
courses. A grade of S is equivalent to 1.5 or 
higher; a grade of U is equivalent to 1.4 or 
lower. The specified course credit will be 
given for grades of S; no credit will be given 
for grades of U. S and U grades are not used 
in computing grade point averages. 

Incomplete Grades: An incomplete (INC) is a 
temporary grade. It is given only when students 
are unable to complete all the requirements 
for a course because of illness and/or pro- 
longed absence due to circumstances beyond 
their control. 

Students who receive an incomplete in a 
course, unless it is a prerequisite course, are 
required to complete the course work within 
one year after the grade is recorded or the 
grade will be changed to a U. If the incom- 
plete is in a course that is prerequisite to 
another course, the student must complete the 
required work before registering for the 
subsequent course. 

The faculty may grant approval fo/ a student 
to repeat a course and/or a full semester if, 
for acceptable reasons, the student's achieve- 
ment was below the school's expected level. 
In such instances, the first grade(s) will not 
appear on the official records. Notations to this 
effect will be entered on the back of the 
transcript but will under no circumstances be 
disclosed. 

Notice of Grades: Grades are issued directly 
to the students at the end of each semester. 
Parents and guardians may be notified when a 
student is placed on academic warning and/or 
asked to withdraw from the School. 

Exemption of Courses: College graduates who 
wish to obtain credit by examination for one 



16 Degree Requirements 



of the biological science or social science 
courses must make an application through the 
Office of Records sixty days prior to the official 
date of enrolling in the course. 

The student will be notified of the date, time, and 
place of examination by the Office of Records. 
The examination must be taken at least two 
weeks prior to enrollment in the course. Upon 
successful completion of the examination, 
the transcript will show the course and credits 
earned by examination. 

Auditing Courses: Students who wish to audit 
a course by regular attendance with the 
privilege of participating in class discussions 
and obtaining all course materials may do so 
by making formal application to the Office of 
Records. Courses with limited enrollment, labo- 
ratory courses (clinical and science), and 
seminar courses will not be open to auditors. 

Students who earn credit for a course by 
examination (as outlined in the Policy on 
Exemption Examinations) may, with the per- 
mission of the faculty member responsible for 
the course, attend selected lectures if there has 
been evidence of limited recall in a particular 
area of content. 

Academic Standing 

In order to be in good standing for a semester, 
a student must: (1) attain a grade of 2.0 or 
better in nursing theory, 1.5 or better in re- 
lated courses, and S in clinical laboratory 
courses; and (2) have a minimal cumulative 
average (M.C.A.) for the semester as follows: 
first semester, 1.6; second semester, 1.76; 
third semester, 1.82; and fourth semester, 1.83. 

Students whose grades or averages fall below 
these levels at midsemester and/or end of 
semester will be placed on academic warning 
by the Office of the Dean. A student may 
remain on academic warning for only one 
semester. If the conditions of the warning have 
not been removed by the end of the next 
semester, the student will be required to 
withdraw from the School of Nursing. 

Dean's List 

Students who attain a semester average of 3.50 
without any D or U grades and have completed 
all of the required course work by the end 
of the semester are eligible for the Dean's 
List. The Dean's List will be posted by the 
Office of Records. 

Dismissal 

The faculty of the School of Nursing reserves 
the privilege of retaining only those students 
who in their judgment demonstrate satisfactory 
progress towards the degree, meeting the 



requirements of scholarship, mental and 
physical health, and personal attributes con- 
sidered suitable for professional nursing 
practice. Students whose suitability for nurs- 
ing is questioned may be asked to withdraw 
from the School. 

Withdrawal 

A student may withdraw from the School at 
any time. The designation of withdrawal in 
good standing will be recorded if the student's 
academic and personal performance is in 
accord with the standards of the School and 
the financial record has been cleared. A stu- 
dent who plans to withdraw must notify the 
Office of Records and discuss the reason for 
leaving with the dean. 

Degree Requirements 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing 
is conferred by Cornell University upon 
recommendation of the faculty of the School 
of Nursing. In order to qualify for the degree, 
the candidate must have attained the required 
cumulative average for the total program and 
have completed satisfactorily all theory and 
clinical laboratory courses outlined in this 
Announcement and/or required by decision of 
the faculty. 

Bachelor of Science with Distinction 

Upon recommendation of the faculty, the 
degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing with 
distinction will be conferred upon those stu- 
dents who: have achieved a cumulative average 
of 3.50, completed all requirements for the 
degree, and attained a grade point average of 
B for college work completed prior to transfer- 
ring to the School of Nursing. 

Sigma Theta Tau 

In 1968 the School received a charter for the 
Alpha Upsilon chapter of Sigma Theta Tau, 
the National Honor Society of Nursing. The 
purposes of the Society are to recognize 
the achievement of scholarship of superior 
quality, to promote the development of leader- 
ship qualities, and to encourage creative work 
while fostering high professional ideals. It is 
hoped that the commitment of the individual 
to the ideals and purposes of professional 
nursing will be strengthened by participation 
in the Honor Society. 

Students who have completed at least one-half 
of the nursing major, and have a minimum 
grade point average of 3.0, are considered for 
induction into Alpha Upsilon chapter. In addi- 
tion to demonstrated superior scholastic 
achievement, a candidate must also give evi- 
dence of professional leadership potential. 



Expenses 17 



Eligibility for State Registration 

Graduates of the School of Nursing are eligible 
for admission to the licensing examination in 
all states. Since states require a nurse to be 
licensed in order to practice nursing, students 
are encouraged to take the examination in 
the state in which they plan to practice. Each 
graduate is expected to take the first licens- 
ing examination that is administered following 
completion of the program. Satisfactory perfor- 
mance on the licensing examination results in 
state registration of the license and the 
designation of Registered Nurse. 

Expenses 

The costs of attending the School of Nursing 
fall into two general categories. The first 
category includes certain fixed charges for 
tuition, fees, and charges for services pro- 
vided by the School. The second category 
includes living costs and items of personal 
expense. To help students prepare their indi- 
vidual budgets an estimated budget is pub- 
lished. Although expenses, excluding fixed 
fees, vary for the individual student, the esti- 
mated budget reflects the usual expenses for 
single, full-time students living in University 
housing. 

The estimated total expenses for the academic 
year include: 

Item Estimate 

*Tuition $2400 

Housing 1500 

Food and maintenance 1000 

Books and supplies 300 

Uniforms, entering students 250 

Transportation, clinical experience 100 

Incidental expenses 250 

**Health insurance 175 



* Tuition: A semester of full-time study con- 
sists of 12-18 credit hours of course work. 
This may be any combination of required elec- 
tive or audited courses. The full tuition will 
be charged and there will be no prorated refund 
for courses dropped or exempt; nor will there 
be an additional charge for electives added 
within this number of credit hours. 

A semester of part-time study consists of ten 
or fewer credit hours of course work. This 
may be any combination of required and elective 
courses. The maximum number of credits to 
be taken by an individual registered for part- 
time study will be by advisement. Tuition of 
$80 per credit hour will be charged. 

** Health insurance: Each student is required 
to be enrolled in a health insurance plan. An 



Fees 

Application Fee. (For applicants registered in 
a general education program.) A fee of $20 
must accompany the application for first 
admission. 

Transfer Fee. (For applicants registered in a 
baccalaureate nursing program.) A fee of $25 is 
charged to evaluate the record of a student 
already registered in a baccalaureate nursing 
program who wishes to apply for transfer 
to this School. 

Reinstatement Fee. (For students previously 
registered in this School.) A fee of $10 will be 
charged to evaluate the record of a former 
student seeking to reregister in this School. 

Acceptance Fee. A nonrefundable deposit 
of $50 is required of every student upon 
acceptance for admission to the University; 
and when the student first registers, it is used 
to cover matriculation costs. The deposit does 
not apply to the first semester's tuition and 
fees. 

Late Registration Fee. A fee of $5 is charged 
to each late registrant. First semester registra- 
tion closes 5 p.m., August 29, 1975. Second 
semester registration closes 5 p.m., Friday, 
January 30, 1976. 

Exemption Examination Fee. The usual fee for 
an exemption examination is $15. 

Fee for Auditing a Course. There will be no 
charge for full-time students. Part-time stu- 
dents will be charged $45 for the privilege of 
receiving the course outline, the bibliography, 
and attending selected classes. 

Payment of Bills 

Bills for fixed charges are distributed approxi- 
mately two weeks prior to each semester. The 
bill is due and payable at registration each 
semester, unless special arrangements have 
been made with the School. The amount, time, 
and manner of payment of tuition, fees, or 
other charges may be changed at any time 

associated hospital plan is available to all 
students in the Medical Center. Students will 
be exempt from enrollment in the Center plan 'f 
they give evidence of carrying comparable 
health insurance and sign a waiver to that 
effect at the time of admission and every 
semester thereafter while registered in the 
School. Students enrolled in the plan available 
at the Medical Center will be billed each 
semester. These charges will appear as a 
separate item on the bill and will reflect the 
current insurance rates. Questions concern- 
ing waivers or billing should be discussed with 
the assistant to the dean, on S 10. 



18 Financial Assistance 



without notice. Students who have questions 
regarding their bills or the payment of grants 
or loans should see the assistant to the dean, 
on S 10. 

Provision is made for the payment of bills during 
the registration period at the beginning of 
each semester. Financial assistance awarded by 
the School, except loans, will be applied 
directly to the fixed charges. No reimburse- 
ment of assistance offered as a grant is 
anticipated unless the student voluntarily leaves 
the School during the course of a semester. 
In this case, a proportionate amount of the 
grant, not to exceed one-half, is to be 
reimbursed. 

In order for a student to remain in good 
standing, receive an honorable withdrawal from 
the School, or participate in the commence- 
ment exercises, all bills must be paid and 
satisfactory arrangements made for the future 
repayment of loans. Any student who registers 
for a semester and then withdraws before 
the semester bill is paid must make a satisfac- 
tory settlement of tuition and fees due before 
the withdrawal form can be signed. 

A student completes arrangements for a loan 
authorized by the School by signing a note and 
receiving the check during the registration 
period. The proceeds of a loan must be applied 
first to the balance due on School charges 
but may not be claimed as an exemption from 
the bill. 

New York State tuition assistance awards may 
not be claimed as an exemption from the tuition 
bill since the state prepares individual checks, 
that are payable to the student, and sends 
them to the School for distribution. Checks for 
these awards will not be available at the time 
tuition and fees are due. When an extension 
of time for payment of part or all of the tuition 
and fees is granted, based on a New York State 
award, it is with the understanding that should 
the state for any reason fail to prepare a 
check for the amount of the award, the student 
is personally responsible for the amount due. 

Refunds 

Part of the tuition will be refunded to students 
who officially withdraw during the first half 
of the semester. The refund will be based on a 
deduction of 10 percent a week on all charges 
as of the first day of the semester. No refund 
will be made after the midsemester. 

Financial Assistance 

In general, students plan to meet the cost of 
their education through self-help (loans and 
employment). To the extent that is possible, 
parents and spouse are expected to con- 
tribute to the cost of a student's education. 



The Cornell University-New York Hospital 
School of Nursing participates in the College 
Scholarship Service (CSS) of the College 
Entrance Examination Board. Participants in 
CSS subscribe to the principle that the amount 
of financial assistance granted a student 
should be based upon financial need. The CSS 
assists colleges and universities and other 
agencies in determining the student's need for 
financial assistance. Each entering student 
who seeks financial assistance is required to 
submit a copy of the appropriate Confidential 
Statement form to the College Scholarship 
Service by February 15, designating Cornell 
University-New York Hospital School of Nurs- 
ing as one of the recipients. The Confidential 
Statement should be obtained from the School 
of Nursing. 

Financial assistance is offered to students 
usually as a combination of scholarship or 
grant, loan, and employment. The scholarships 
and grants administered by the School are 
described below. These are assigned on the 
basis of need rather than academic rating. 

Loans may be available from a fund estab- 
lished jointly by the School and the federal 
government. No more than $2,500 may be 
borrowed by a student during an academic 
year. The amount of loan awarded to each 
eligible student is dependent upon the total 
amount of federal funding made available to 
the School. To be eligible for either a grant or 
a loan, a student must intend to be enrolled 
at least half-time and demonstrate the need 
for financial assistance. In addition, the student 
must be a citizen or national of the United 
States, or have immigration status and personal 
plans to justify the conclusion that he or she 
intends to become a permanent resident of the 
United States. 

Application for Financial Assistance 

Entering students who will need financial assist- 
ance should return the Financial Assistance 
Application with their application forms by 
February 15. These will be forwarded to the 
chairperson of the Financial Assistance Com- 
mittee. The Confidential Statement should be 
filed through the College Scholarship Service by 
February 15 of the year the applicant anticipates 
admission to the School of Nursing. 

Students enrolled in the School who expect to 
register for the next academic year and who 
anticipate the need for financial assistance, 
should make appointments to see the chair- 
person of the Financial Assistance Committee 
before December 15. Students receiving financial 
assistance may arrange an interview with the 
chairperson of the committee during the fall 
semester to review their awards. Those who 
may or may not be receiving financial assistance 
and whose family situations change during an 





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20 General Information 



academic year, should fee! free to discuss their 
problems with the chairperson of the com- 
mittee. 

Financial Assistance Administered 
by the School 

Vivian B. Allen Scholarship Fund. Established 
as an endowed fund by gifts from the Vivian B. 
Allen Foundation, Inc.; income from which is 
used to provide scholarship aid annually for one 
or more students in need of financial assistance. 

Allstate Foundation Grant. A grant is made 
available to the School each year to assist a 
student throughout the program. 

Juliette E. Blohme Scholarship Fund. 

Established as an endowed fund by Dr. and 
Mrs. George H. Van Emburgh as a memorial to 
Juliette E. Blohme of the class of 1922 through 
a gift of $6,000, the interest on which may be 
used in whole or in part each year. 

Fund of the Committee for Scholarships. A 

fund, established and maintained by a 
committee of women interested in the School 
of Nursing, to assist students who need 
financial help in order to prepare for nursing. 
Awards from the fund are made to entering 
students and to students enrolled in the School. 

Cornell Women's Club of New York. In the 

spring of the year a scholarship is made avail- 
able by this Club for the ensuing school year. 
It is awarded either to an entering student or a 
student enrolled in the School. 

Davison/ Foreman Foundation Grant. Grants 
from this Foundation are allocated in the spring 
semester for the education of women working 
for a college degree. The awards are made 
to students enrolled in the School. 

Samuel J. Moritz Scholarship Fund. Estab- 
lished in 1960 as a memorial to Samuel J. Moritz, 
and made possible by a gift from Edward Moritz 
and LeRoy Moses, executors of his estate. 
The income provides scholarship aid annually 
to one or more students in need of financial 
assistance. 

Helena Rubinstein Foundation, Inc. Grant. 

Grants from this Foundation are made available 
to the School and administered to students 
who have demonstrated need for financial 
assistance. 

The Switzer Foundation Grant. A grant of 
$2,500 is made available to the School each 
year. This grant is intended to assist students 
who are American citizens living within fifty 
miles of New York City and who have financial 
need. 



Tudor Foundation Student Loan Fund. A loan 
Fund established by the Foundation and 
administered by the School to assist students 
in need of aid who hold scholarships or grants 
to defray the cost of tuition and who need 
further financial assistance to enable them 
to attend the School. Loans from the Fund 
are not to exceed $1,000 to any one student in 
any one school year. 

Women's Florist Association, Inc., Scholarship. 

Under a scholarship plan established in 1949 
by the Women's Florist Association, Inc., a 
nursing student who has satisfactorily com- 
pleted one year of the nursing major is eligible 
for a scholarship not to exceed the sum of $200. 
This scholarship is to be used for tuition by a 
student in financial need. Since 1959, two of 
these scholarships have been made available 
to the School of Nursing each year. 

The Christian C. Yegen Scholarship Fund. 

Established in the spring of 1965 as a memorial 
to Mr. Christian C. Yegen, father of an alumna 
of the Cornell University-New York Hospital 
School of Nursing. 

Financial Assistance Administered 
by Outside Sources 

New York State Regents Scholarships, 
Grants, and Loans 

The following assistance is available for resi- 
dents of New York State. 

Tuition Assistance Program. Grants of $1 00- 
$600 yearly, depending on need and tuition 
paid, with a minimum yearly grant of $100. 
For those students who demonstrate a capacity 
to pursue a degree and plan to attend college, 
and to those who are presently in college and 
maintain satisfactory academic performance. 

For more information on these awards, write to 
the Regents Examination and Scholarship 
Center, 99 Washington Avenue, Albany, New 
York 12210. 

New York Higher Education Assistance 
Corporation sponsors a program through which 
students may obtain loans from local savings 
banks. 



General Information 



School Organization 

Any student entering the School is automatically 
a member of the student organization. The 
functions of this organization are to contribute 
to the development of the professional educa- 
tion of the individual student through co- 



22 General Information 



operation with fellow students and faculty; to 
represent the individual student in matters of 
student-faculty concern; to encourage in the 
student body maturity in matters of scholarship 
and personal conduct; to provide an all- 
inclusive organization through which business 
pertaining to the whole body of students may 
be transacted; and to foster an attitude of 
involvement in student life and development in 
the nursing program. 

Housing 

Facilities 

Students attending the School of Nursing may 
live in University housing or select their own 
living facilities within the community. Applica- 
tions for University housing should be available 
about April 1. 

Jacob S. Lasdon House, located at 420 East 
70 Street, provides fully furnished, carpeted, 
and air-conditioned apartments with kitchens, 
dining areas, living rooms, and baths for both 
single and married nursing, medical, and 
graduate students registered in Cornell. Single 
students may share a one- or two-bedroom 
apartment. By using the living room and the 
bedroom(s) as individual bedroom/study 
rooms, two students may share a one-bedroom 
apartment and three students may share a 
two-bedroom apartment. Four single students 
may share a two-bedroom apartment if two 
students share one bedroom. There are a limited 
amount of studio apartments for married stu- 
dents. Married students without children will 
find the studio and one-bedroom apartments 
suitable. Married students with children will 
find the two-bedroom apartment more appro- 
priate. 

Regulations 

Students signing leases for University housing 
must notify the appropriate office at least thirty 
days in advance of any move or change of 
roommate. 

Students living a distance from the School 
should consider the time to be spent in 
commuting each day. Classes and clinical ex- 
perience may be scheduled Monday through 
Saturday in a combination of hours that may 
begin as early as 7:30 a.m. and end at 
9:00 p.m. 

All students must keep the Office of Records 
informed of their correct address and tele- 
phone number. The Student Handbook outlines 
the system used for distribution of official 
School communications to students. Each 
student is expected to follow the procedure 
to avoid delay in responding to the com- 
munications. 



Recreational Facilities 

Because the School believes that the education 
of young men and women today includes 
healthful social relationships, provisions have 
been made for the development of such rela- 
tionships in the life of the student. 

A social committee is responsible for a full and 
varied social calendar that includes such 
activities as dances, coffee hours, and suppers. 
Other activities in which students may par- 
ticipate are the yearbook and singing groups. 
The director of student relations is available 
at all times to advise students in the organiza- 
tion of discussion groups and in the planning 
of social and cultural activities. 

Health Services 

Personnel Health Service of The New York 
Hospital, located in J— 1, provides health care 
for students enrolled in the School. This in- 
cludes: a physical examination and routine tests 
following the initial registration in the School, 
an ongoing immunization program, ambulatory 
medical care in the outpatient clinics, and, 
when indicated, admission to The New York 
Hospital. The health of the student is closely 
monitored throughout the program with the 
expectation that each student will be self- 
directive in maintaining a positive health status. 

Health insurance is required. At registration, 
each student must either enroll in the Blue 
Cross/Blue Shield of Greater New York plan 
available at the School or provide evidence of 
equivalent health insurance coverage and 
sign a waiver. For insurance coverage through 
the School, a fee will be charged each semester 
based on the current insurance rate. (See 
Expenses p. 17.) 

Students are expected to take corrective action 
for any health problems including dental work 
before registration in the School. Any subse- 
quent elective procedures are to be scheduled 
during vacation periods. 

If in the opinion of the Personnel Health Service 
physician, the condition of a student's physical 
or emotional health makes it unwise for the 
student to remain in the program, the School 
authorities may require the student to withdraw 
either temporarily or permanently at any time. 

Counseling Services 

The School maintains active counseling services 
that are available to any students who need 
assistance, either in connection with routine 
matters that may come up in their work in the 
School or in connection with special personal 
problems. 

The director of student relations assists stu- 
dents in every way possible in their educational, 



Facilities for Instruction 23 



personal, and social adjustment, and co- 
operates with the faculty in helping students 
in these areas and directs students to those 
members of the staff who are best qualified 
to be of assistance in relation to the particular 
problem at hand. 

Group therapy is also made available through 
the office of the director of student relations 
to assist students whose effectiveness and 
adjustment are impaired by personal concerns. 

Division of Continuing 
Education 

The Division of Continuing Education is an 
organized educational unit of the School of 
Nursing under the administration of the dean. 

The Division offers organized and planned 
presentations of appropriate educational ex- 
periences at a professional level that are 
university oriented and related to the needs and 
purposes of the employment or practice situa- 
tion. The programs offered by the Division 
have their origins in selected areas of nursing 
practice. The objectives of the programs are 
directed toward enabling registered nurses, both 
in practice and returning to practice, to update 
and expand their knowledge and skills in 
circumscribed areas of clinical nursing practice. 

A variety of special workshops and formalized 
training programs are conducted cooperatively 
with the Cornell University Medical College, 
the professional staffs of The New York 
Hospital-Cornell Medical Center; the Depart- 
ment of Health, Health Services Administration 
of the City of New York; the Visiting Nurse 
Service of New York; and other cooperating 
community agencies. 

Information on programs being offered, 
applications, and fees may be obtained by 
writing to: Division of Continuing Education, 
515 East 71 Street, New York, New York, 10021. 

Facilities for Instruction 

The facilities of The New York Hospital-Cornell 
Medical Center provide the setting for the 
major part of the educational program offered 
to students in both divisions of the School of 
Nursing. The classroom and office facilities for 
the School are located at 515 East 71 Street. 
In addition to the usual classroom and con- 
ference room facilities, there are an audio- 
visual laboratory and learning laboratories for 
the practice of basic nursing skill. 



The library, in the Samuel J. Wood Library and 
Research Building at 1300 York Avenue, is 
shared by the students and the faculties of the 
School of Nursing and the Medical College, 
and the staff of The New York Hospital. 

The reading room of the library is located on 
the first floor. Adjoining the reading room are 
the sections for current journals, reference works, 
and monographs. The book stacks and carrels 
are on two floors below the main reading room. 
Sixteen hundred current journals are received 
each year; the total collection has reached more 
than 100,000 volumes. 

The library also is equipped with a com- 
munication terminal linked to a computer to 
provide searches of the medical literature. The 
Information and Reference Department receives 
requests for these searches. Typing and 
duplicating services and, most importantly, a 
staff willing to help are also available. 

The clinical nursing departments have small 
libraries containing literature pertaining espe- 
cially to the subject matter of the department. 
These collections, interlibrary loans, and photo- 
duplicate copies from other libraries, including 
the National Library of Medicine, supplement 
the main library. 

All students have clinical experience on the 
patient units of The New York Hospital. The 
Hospital comprises five clinical departments — 
Medicine, Surgery, Lying-in Hospital, Pediatrics, 
and The Payne Whitney Clinic (psychiatry). 
Each of these units (largely self-contained) has 
facilities for inpatients and outpatients, and for 
teaching and conducting research. The Hospital 
has approximately eleven hundred beds and 
ninety clinics. 

In order to meet the objectives of the program, 
the School of Nursing contracts with selected 
voluntary and governmental agencies for addi- 
tional clinical experiences. It is a requirement 
of the program that each student participate in 
the care of patients in the community. Repre- 
sentatives of various governmental and voluntary 
agencies plan with the faculty for appropriate 
ways to contribute to the student's knowledge 
of the community and the organization for 
human services. Individuals who feel it would 
be difficult to travel within some parts of the 
New York City community and to participate 
fully in assigned experiences, should give 
thoughtful consideration to this before regis- 
tering in the program of the School. 



Cornell University 



Description of Courses 



Nursing Courses 



All academic courses of the University are open 
to students of all races, religions, ethnic origins, 
ages, sexes, and political persuasions. No re- 
quirement, prerequisite, device, rule, or other 
means shall be used by any employee of the 
University to encourage, establish, or maintain 
segregation on the basis of race, religion, ethnic 
origin, age, sex, or political persuasion in any 
academic course of the University. 

156 Introduction to the Nursing Process, Care 
of the Adult Patient Fall. Credit: five hours, 
theory; five hours, clinical laboratory. 
M. Sugimoto and faculty. 
Composed of two units. The first unit is con- 
cerned with introduction of the nursing process, 
and learning and practicing nursing skills 
basic to all nursing care. During the second 
unit, the nursing process is applied to the 
care of adult patients with representative 
medical-surgical health problems. Pharma- 
cology, nutrition, and diet therapy are integrated 
throughout the course. The clinical area is 
utilized to apply concepts and skills in caring 
for patients with major medical-surgical health 
problems. 

154-157 Maternal-Child Nursing Fall and 
spring. Credit: five hours, theory; five hours, 
clinical laboratory. Prerequisite: Nursing 
153-156. Registration for this course is by 
advisement. E. W. Haas and faculty. 
Emphasis is placed on the study of the health 
needs of childbearing women, their children, 
and families. Family influences, social trends, 
and normal development are integrated through- 
out the semester. The concept of nurturance for 
the promotion of optimum health provides the 
framework for nursing intervention. Experiences 
are provided in teaching principles of health 
maintenance to families in a variety of settings. 



160 Interpersonal Processes in Nursing Fall. 
Credit one hour. Prerequisite: psychology, three 
credits; sociology, three credits. L. Schwager. 
Concepts of behavior, anxiety, socialization, 
and grief are studied in the context of the 
nurse-patient relationship. Emphasis is on 
principles of communication and interviewing. 
The content is prerequisite to subsequent 
nursing courses. 

250 Transition to Nursing Practice Spring 
Credit: five hours, theory; seven hours, clinical 
laboratory. Prerequisites: Nursing 153, 154, 155. 
J. B. Dorie and faculty. 
Offers the student the opportunity to care for a 
group of individuals with a variety of health 
care needs including oncological conditions. 
Within these groups the student will assist 
individuals and/or families to achieve their 
optimal degree of health as goals are modified 
to reflect evolving needs. The student will have 
the opportunity to apply leadership principles 
in the management of patient care through 
participation with other health care workers 
in a variety of settings. 

256 Community Health: Care of Patients with 
Environmentally Related Health Problems 

Fall and spring. Credit: five hours, theory; five 
hours, clinical laboratory. Prerequisites: Nursing 
156. Registration for this course is by advise- 
ment. B. H. Rosner and faculty. 
Focus is on the prevention and control of 
selected community health problems; e.g., 
cerebral vascular accident, venereal disease, 
tuberculosis, mental illness, and social prob- 
lems such as addiction. The modality of 
nursing care will be both individual (thera- 
peutic nurse-patient relationship) and group 
(family) in acute psychiatric hospital settings 
and the community. The common denominator 
utilized in teaching the selected community 
health problems will be the epidemiological 
approach. Experience is also provided for stu- 
dents to have ongoing observations and 
participation in the dynamics of group process. 



26 Description of Courses 



257 Dimensions of Nursing Spring. Credit: 
four hours, theory; eight hours, clinical labo- 
ratory. Prerequisites: Nursing 156, 157, 256. 
Faculty to be appointed. 
Consideration of selected aspects of profes- 
sional nurse practice: caring for patients 
who have multiple and complex nursing needs; 
sharing responsibility for nursing care of groups 
of patients; and participating in the leader- 
ship activities related to nursing care. A variety 
of settings will be utilized for clinical learning. 

360 Assessment of Health Status of Children 
or Adults Fall, intersession, and spring. Credit: 
two hours. Required course: registered nurses; 
other students by advisement. M. Miller. 
Supervised practice in techniques of observa- 
tion, interviewing, percussion, palpation, and 
auscultation with emphasis on normal ranges 
of the healthy individual. The course includes 
relevant anatomy, physiology, and pathology 
basic to understanding the significance of find- 
ings. Six hours of combined conference and 
practice are required each week. 

365 Clinical Nursing — Acute Care of Children 
or Adults Fall. Credit: five hours. Prerequi- 
site: Course 360 must be taken prior to or 
concurrently with this course. Required course: 
registered nurses not taking Course 366. 

B. Jones. 

Within this clinical experience core the student 
has the opportunity to develop proficiency in 
the exercise of clinical judgment and skills 
requisite to the supportive management of 
children or adults who require continuous, com- 
prehensive observation in an intensive or 
critical care environment. Opportunities are 
provided for systematic study in a clinical 
area of interest. The focus is on nursing 
functions: assessment and problem-related in- 
tervention through health counseling, health 
education, and preventive, restorative, and 
therapeutic measures. Associated seminars 
serve as a mode for extending the scope of 
knowledge and experience and for developing 
professional peer communication and decision- 
making skills. Fifteen hours of combined prac- 
tice and correlated seminars are required 
each week. 

366 Clinical Nursing — Long Term or Chronic 
Illness of Children or Adults Fall. Credit: 

five hours. Prerequisite: Course 360 must be 
taken prior to or concurrently with this course. 
Required course: registered nurses not taking 
Course 365. B. Jones. 

Within this clinical experience core the stu- 
dent has the opportunity to develop proficiency 
in the exercise of clinical judgment and 
skills requisite to the supportive management 
of children or adults with long-term or pro- 
gressive chronic illness. Opportunities are pro- 
vided for systematic study in a clinical area 



of interest. The focus is on nursing functions: 
on assessment and problem-related inter- 
vention through health counseling, health 
education, and preventive, restorative, and 
therapeutic measures. Associated seminars 
serve as a mode for extending the scope of 
knowledge and experience and for developing 
professional peer communication and decision- 
making skills. Fifteen hours of combined 
practice and correlated seminars are required 
each week. 

367 Clinical Nursing — Primary Care of Chil- 
dren or Adults Spring. Credit: five hours. 
Prerequisite: Nursing 365 or 366. Required 
course: registered nurses. B. Jones. 
Within this clinical experience core the student 
has the opportunity to develop proficiency in 
the initial screening assessment of the 
psychosocial and physical status of children 
or adults and responsibility of the continuum 
of care of selected patients within the protocols 
mutually agreed upon by medical and nurs- 
ing personnel. Experiences offer opportunities 
for the reinforcement or development of skills 
in case finding, interpretation of selected 
laboratory tests, health counseling, health 
teaching and techniques of surveillance and 
management of care for the selected patients 
(children or adults) in ambulatory care settings. 
Associated seminars serve as a mode for 
extending the scope of knowledge and experi- 
ence and for developing professional peer 
communication and decision-making skills. 
Fifteen hours of combined practice and corre- 
lated seminars are required each week. 

Professionally Related Courses 

131-134 Biological Science Fall and spring. 
Credit: three hours. Prerequisite: Biological 
Science 130 or 133. Required prior to or con- 
current with Nursing 154-157. R. S. Rubenstein. 
This course includes some aspects of human 
reproductive physiology: male and female 
anatomy, sex steroids, birth control, and maternal 
and neonatal physiology. Also covered are 
principles of heredity, medical genetics, and 
simple embryogenesis. There will be a survey 
of pathogenic microorganisms to acquaint the 
student with communicable diseases that are 
endemic and epidemic. 

133 Biological Science Fall and spring. 
Credit: three hours. Required course: all stu- 
dents. V. Stolar. 

An introduction to the fundamental mechanisms 
of human physiology. The course progresses 
from the cell to the complexities of human 
control systems, utilizing at each level of in- 
creasing complexity the information and 
principles developed previously. This approach 
is based on the theme that all phenomena of 



Description of Courses 27 



life are ultimately describable in terms of 
physical and chemical laws. 

136 Biological Science Fall and spring 
Credit: three hours. Prerequisite: Biological 
Science 133. Required course: all students. 
V. Stolar. 

Morphological and functional study of the 
nervous system in man. Histology, neuro- 
transmitters, gross anatomy, stimulus-response, 
and integrative control are covered. The 
physiology of striated, smooth, and cardiac 
muscle will be included. 

140 Pharmacology Fall. Credit: two hours. 
Prerequisite: Nursing 156 or equivalent. Re- 
quired course: registered nurses; other students 
by advisement. A. B. Drakontides. 
The emphasis of the course is placed on the 
basic principles of pharmacology. These prin- 
ciples are elaborated in discussions of drugs 
acting on the nervous system, cardiovascular 
drugs, chemotherapy, endocrine pharmacology, 
and drug interactions. 

247 Epidemiology Fall. Credit: two hours. 
Required course: registered nurses; other 
students by advisement. M. Warren, R. S. 
Rubenstein. 

Introductory course in which the meaning and 
scope of epidemiology are considered. Relevant 
content is drawn from biostatistics, micro- 
biology, environmental studies, and health 
service administration. Particular emphasis is 
on scientific appraisal of community health 
and the processes involved in determining the 
health of people as it is influenced by changing 
patterns of health and disease in a society. 

108 Introduction to Research Spring. Credit: 
two hours. Required course: all students. 
Faculty to be appointed. 

The student is introduced to the basic skills 
needed for the evaluation of research material — 
critical thinking about situational and written 
data pertinent to nursing, and recognition of 
appropriate use of common statistical concepts. 

109 Life-span Growth and Development 

Part I Fall. Credit: two hours. Required course: 
all students. L. Schwager. 
Study of the psychophysiological and psycho- 
social factors that produce a range of human 
behavior in the life cycle from birth through 
childhood years. The focus will be on physical, 
sensory, and perceptual, motor, cognitive and 
language, personality, and social development. 

110 Life-span Growth and Development 

Part II Spring. Credit: two hours. Prerequi- 



site: 109 Life-span Growth and Development 
or by permission of instructor. Required course: 
all students. L. Schwager. 
Study of the psychophysiological and psycho- 
social factors that produce a range of human 
behavior in the life cycle from adolescent years 
through aging years. The focus will be on 
continued development, maturation, and/or 
decline in physical, perceptual, cognitive, moral, 
sexual, personality, and social functioning. 

207 Nursing in the Social Order Spring 
Credit: two hours. Required course: all students. 
L. Schwager. 

The structure and function of both formal and 
informal social organizations are considered, 
especially as they influence the work of the 
professional nurse in the delivery of health 
services. 

246 Public Health Fall. Credit: two hours. 
M. P. Cunningham. 

A study of community health needs and designs 
for meeting these needs. Programs and 
organizations participating in the formal and 
informal community health structure will be 
examined using an epidemiologic framework. 

Spanish for Health Professionals Spring. 
Credit: two hours. Prerequisite: one year of 
Spanish (vocabulary and grammar) and 
pretesting for section assignment. Elective. 
Faculty to be appointed. 
The course assists the person already familiar 
with Spanish to develop skills in conversation as 
it relates to health care services. 

Independent Study Offers the student an 
opportunity to delineate an area of interest for 
self-directed, systematic study under the 
preceptorship of a faculty member. Planned 
essentially for the winter intersession, on- 
or off-campus study is possible for credit 
ranging from one to four hours. S-U grades. 
Proposals must have the approval of the 
Committee for Independent Study. 

Guided Study Offers qualified students an 
opportunity to participate in a specially designed 
program of study and course visitation under 
the direction of a faculty member. It permits 
participation in classes, seminars, conferences, 
library research, and selected nursing service 
programs. Offered within the regular term 
date. No credit or grade is given but a record 
of achievement is filed in the student record. 
A special fee is established after consultation 
with the dean's office. Request for attendance 
is filed in the Office of Records and referred to 
the dean. 




•■■■■BKsSs 



IKHSSTOSmBi 




Cornell University 



Register 



University Administration 



Dale R. Corson, President of the University 

David C. Knapp, University Provost 

Mark Barlow, Jr., Vice Provost 

W. Donald Cooke, Vice President for Research 

June M. Fessenden-Raden, Vice Provost 

William D. Gurowitz, Vice President for 

Campus Affairs 
Robert T. Horn, Vice President and 

Chief Investment Officer 
Samuel A. Lawrence, Vice President for 

Administration 
E. Hugh Luckey, Vice President for Medical 

Affairs 
Robert M. Matyas, Vice President for 

Planning and Facilities 
Paul L. McKeegan, Vice Provost 
Arthur H. Peterson, University Treasurer and 

Chief Fiscal Officer 
Richard M. Ramin, Vice President for 

Public Affairs 
Byron W. Saunders, Dean of the 

University Faculty 
Neal R. Stamp, University Counsel and 

Secretary of the Corporation 

The New York Hospital- 
Cornell Medical Center 
Administration 

E. Hugh Luckey, M.D., President 
Charles H. Dick, Vice President for 

Public Affairs 
Roger H. Sheldon, Vice President for Planning 
Theodore S. Alexander, Director of Development 

The New York Hospital 
Administration 

David D. Thompson, M.D., Director 
Melville A. Piatt, M.D., Executive Associate 
Director 



H. Henry Bertram, Associate Director, 

Personnel Services 
Susan T. Carver, M.D., Associate Director, 

Professional Services 
Richard J. Olds, Associate Director, 

Engineering and General Services 
H. Mefford Runyon, Associate Director, 

Corporate Affairs 
John Watson, Associate Director, Financial 

Services 
Cosmo J. LaCosta, Assistant Director 

Joint Administrative Board 

Representatives from the Board of 
Trustees of Cornell University 

Dale R. Corson, Chairman 1976 
Arthur H. Dean 
Robert W. Purcell 
Harold D. Uris 

Representatives from the Board of 
Governors of the Society of the 
New York Hospital 

Stanley de J. Osborne, Chairman 1975 
Kenneth H. Hannan 
Frederick K. Trask, Jr. 
John Hay Whitney 

Members at Large 

E. Roland Harriman 
Walter B. Wriston 

Ex Officio Member 

E. Hugh Luckey, M.D. 

Officers of the School 

Dale R. Corson, Ph.D., President of the 

University 
David C. Knapp, Ph.D., Provost of the University 



30 Register 



Eleanor C. Lambertsen, Ed.D., D.Sc. (Hon.), 

R.N., Dean of the School of Nursing and 

Professor of Nursing 
Louise S. Hazeltine, M.A., R.N., Associate Dean 

and Assistant Professor of Nursing 
Nina T. Argondizzo, M.A., R.N., Assistant Dean 

and Assistant Professor of Nursing 
Gloria E. Wilson, M.A., R.N., Assistant Dean and 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 

Faculty and Staff 

Administration 

Eleanor C. Lambertsen, Ed.D., D.Sc. (Hon.), 

R.N., Dean of the School of Nursing and 

Professor of Nursing 
Louise S. Hazeltine, M.A., R.N., Associate Dean 

and Assistant Professor of Nursing 
Nina T. Argondizzo, M.A., R.N., Assistant Dean 

and Assistant Professor of Nursing 
Gloria E. Wilson, M.A., R.N., Assistant Dean 

and Assistant Professor of Nursing 
Meimi Joki, A.B., Assistant to the Dean 
Edna Johnson, Director of Student Relations 
Judith A. Court, M.A., Director of Admissions 

Undergraduate Faculty 

Eddie Mae Barnes, M.A., R.N., Assistant 
Professor of Nursing; Director of Nursing, 
Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic 

Helen M. Berg, Ed.D., R.N., Associate Pro- 
fessor of Nursing; Department Head of 
Medical Nursing 

Mary T. Bielski, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor 
of Nursing; Department Head, Baker Pavilion 
Nursing Service 

Marie Boguslawski, M.S.N., R.N., Assistant 
Professor of Nursing 

Marion Peters Braxton, M.P.H., R.N., Assistant 
Professor of Nursing 

Francesca Castronovo, M.A., R.N., Assistant 
Professor of Nursing 

Margaret Cotterell, M.A., R.N., Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Nursing 

Sister Catherine M. Cummings, M.S.N., R.N., 
Assistant Professor of Nursing 

Marion Phyllis Cunningham, M.S., R.N., 
Assistant Professor of Nursing 

Lynne J. Dawson, M.P.H., R.N., Instructor in 
Nursing 

Helen Demitroff, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor 
of Nursing 

Jeanne B. Dorie, M.A., R.N., Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Nursing 

Anna B. Drakontides, Ph.D., Associate Professor 
of Pharmacology 

Gladys M. Dykstra, M.A., R.N., Instructor in 
Nursing 

Dorothy Ellison, M.A., R.N., Associate Pro- 
fessor of Nursing; Department Head of 
Operating Room Nursing 



I. Darlene Erlander, M.A., R.D., Assistant 
Professor of Nutrition 

Ann K. Galligan, M.S., R.N., Assistant Professor 
of Nursing 

Elenora Haas, M.S., R.N., C.N.M., Assistant 
Professor of Nursing 

Louise S. Hazeltine, M.A., R.N., Assistant 
Professor of Nursing; Associate Dean 

Eleanor Krohn Herrmann, M.S., R.N., Assistant 
Professor of Nursing 

Maryann Johnston, M.Ed., R.N., Instructor in 
Nursing 

Bonnie L. Jones, M.S., R.N., Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Nursing 

Jo Ann Keith, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of 
Nursing 

Katherine A. Knight, M.Ed., R.N., Assistant 
Professor of Nursing 

Patricia A. Kosten, M.Ed., R.N., Assistant 
Professor of Nursing 

Eleanor C. Lambertsen, Ed.D., D.Sc. (Hon.), 
R.N., Professor of Nursing; Dean of the 
School of Nursing 

Mariamma K. Mathai, M.Ed., R.N., Instructor in 
Nursing 

Martha A. McNiff, M.A., R.N., Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Nursing 

Marjorie A. Miller, M.S., R.N., Associate 
Professor of Nursing 

Agnes E. Morgan, M.A., R.N., Assistant Profes- 
sor of Nursing 

Diana Newman, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 

Deanna R. Pearlmutter, Ed.D., R.N., Associate 
Professor of Nursing 

Bernice Horner-Rosner, M.S.N., R.N., Assistant 
Professor of Nursing 

Reva Scharf Rubenstein, Ph.D., Associate Pro- 
fessor of Science 

Lois Schwager, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor 
of Nursing 

Laura L. Simms, Ed.D., R.N., Associate 
Professor of Nursing; Department Head of 
Surgical Nursing 

Elizabeth D. Ivey Smith, M.A., R.N., Assistant 
Professor of Nursing 

Vera Stolar, M.S., R.N., Assistant Professor of 
Science 

Marie D. Strickland, M.Ed., R.N., Assistant 
Professor of Nursing; Department Head of 
Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing 

Madeleine S. Sugimoto, M.Ed., M.A., R.N., 
Assistant Professor of Nursing 

Carolyn E. Wagner, M.A., R.N., Instructor in 
Nursing; Department Head of Outpatient 
Nursing 

Imelda C. Weisinger, M.A., R.N., Instructor in 
Nursing 

Eloise Werlin, M.S., R.N., Assistant Professor of 
Nursing 

Rita Reis Wieczorek, Ed.D., R.N., Assistant 
Professor of Nursing 

Gloria E. Wilson, M.A., R.N., Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Nursing; Assistant Dean 



Register 31 



Continuing Education Faculty 

Nina T. Argondizzo, M.A., R.N., Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Nursing; Assistant Dean 

Eddie Mae Barnes, M.A., R.N., Assistant Profes- 
sor of Nursing; Director of Nursing, Payne 
Whitney Psychiatric Clinic 

Mary Bartlett, M.S., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 

Louise Battista, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 

Helen M. Berg, Ed.D., R.N., Associate Professor 
of Nursing; Department Head of Medical 
Nursing 

Mary T. Bielski, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor 
of Nursing; Department Head, Baker Pavilion 
Nursing Service 

Barbara Boyce, M.A., R.N., Instructor in 
Nursing 

Grace E. Brown, M.A., R.N., Instructor in 
Nursing 

Amy Chou, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 

Elaine Crimmins, M.A., R.N., Instructor in 
Nursing 

Edna Danielsen, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor 
of Nursing 

Virginia C. Dericks, M.A., R.N., Assistant 
Professor of Nursing 

Alice DonDero, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor 
of Nursing; Department Head of Pediatric 
Nursing 

Dorothy Ellison, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor 
of Nursing; Department Head of Operating 
Room Nursing 

Joanne Foster, M.A., R.N., Administrative 

Liaison, Assistant Director of Nursing Service 

Geraldine K. Glass, M.A., R.N., Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Nursing 

Alene Haas, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 

Christina L. Haas, M.A., R.N., Instructor in 
Nursing 

Alice Hugo, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of 
Nursing 

Patricia Jones, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 

Helen King, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 

Eleanor C. Lambertsen, Ed.D., D.Sc. (Hon.), 
R.N., Professor of Nursing; Dean of the 
School of Nursing 

Martha Leonard, M.N., R.N., Instructor in 
Nursing 

Emelia Luddy, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 

Margery Manly, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 

Marjorie A. Miller, M.S., R.N., Associate Pro- 
fessor of Nursing 

Grace Moroukian, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor 
of Nursing 

Margaret J. O'Brien, M.A., M.P.H., R.N., Adjunct 
Assistant Professor 

Patricia M. O'Regan, M.A., R.N., Instructor in 
Nursing 

Madeline Petrillo, M.Ed., R.N., Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Nursing 

Eva M. Reese, M.S., R.N., Adjunct Assistant 
Professor 

Lena J. Saffioti, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor 
of Nursing 



Adele Schlosser, M.P.H., R.N., Adjunct Assistant 
Professor 

Doris Schwartz, M.A., R.N., Associate Pro- 
fessor of Nursing 

Laura L. Simms, Ed.D., R.N., Associate Pro- 
fessor of Nursing; Department Head of 
Surgical Nursing 

Marie D. Strickland, M.Ed., R.N., Assistant 
Professor of Nursing; Department Head of 
Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing 

Carolyn E. Wagner, M.A., R.N., Instructor in 
Nursing; Department Head of Outpatient 
Nursing 

Mamie Kwoh Wang, M.A., R.N., Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Nursing 

Margie Warren, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor 
of Nursing 

Emeritus Professors 

Virginia M. Dunbar, M.A., R.N., Professor 

Emeritus of Nursing and Dean Emeritus 
Verda F. Hickox, M.A., R.N., Professor Emeritus 

of Nursing 
Mary Klein, M.A., R.N., Professor Emeritus of 

Nursing 
Margery T. Overholser, M.A., R.N., Professor 

Emeritus of Nursing 
Bessie A. R. Parker, B.S., R.N., Professor 

Emeritus of Nursing 
Veronica Lyons Roehner, M.A., R.N., Professor 

Emeritus of Nursing 
Henderika J. Rynbergen, M.S., Professor 

Emeritus of Science 
Agnes Schubert, M.S., R.N., Professor Emeritus 

of Nursing 

Class of 1976 

The name of the student is followed by his or 
her home address. The college or university 
from which the student transferred is given 
in parentheses. 

Program I 

Adams, Yvonne, New York, New York (University 

of Delaware) 
Almquist, Gretchen, Milford, Pennsylvania 

(Vassar College) 
Andreasen, Christine, Apalachin, New York 

(Houghton College) 
Anyaogu, Evelyn, Nigeria (City College) 
Baglio, Virginia, Oneida, New York 

(Manhattanville College) 
Bukberg, Anne, Plainview, New York (State 

University at Binghamton) 
Bures, Elyse, Melville, New York (Mt. Holyoke 

College) 
Collins, Catherine, Denville, New Jersey 

(Caldwell College) 
Davis, Diane, Medfield, Massachusetts (Hood 

College) 



32 Register 



DeCastro, Eileen, Bronx, New York (St. John's 

University) 
Dembo, Judith, New York, New York 

(Allegheny College) 
Enchelmaier, Nancy, North Caldwell, New 

Jersey (Houghton College) 
Epstein, Sheryl, Brooklyn, New York (Brooklyn 

College) 
Facca, Elissa, Whitestone, New York (Hunter 

College) 
Farkas, Carol, New York, New York (Finch 

College) 
Frole, Patricia, Bronx, New York (Fordham 

University) 
Fruchter, Irene, Brooklyn, New York (Brooklyn 

College) 
Glick, Joan, Glen Cove, New York (State 

University at Stony Brook) 
Gussman, Debra, Huntingdon Valley, Pennsyl- 
vania (Temple University) 
Harris, Margaret, Avon, Connecticut (Newton 

College of the Sacred Heart) 
Hooley, Priscilla, Merritt Island, Florida (Wake 

Forest University) 
Jacobson, Eleanor, White Plains, New York 

(Newton College of the Sacred Heart) 
Johnson, Deborah, Claverack, New York 

(Cornell University) 
Kessler, Diane, Closter, New Jersey (Barnard 

College) 
Kilroy, Kenneth, Stoneham, Massachusetts 

(Northeastern University) 
Kirwan, Diane, Demarest, New Jersey (Mary 

Washington College) 
Klein, Karen, Lynbrook, New York (Cornell 

University) 
Knorton, Donna, Santa Clara, California (West 

Valley College) 
Kornfeld, Karen, Brooklyn, New York 

(Kingsborough Community College) 
Krongaus, Laurie, Encino, California (University 

of California) 
Lahm, Maxine, Plainview, New York (State 

University at Stony Brook) 
Levine, Anita, North Bellmore, New York 

(State University at Stony Brook) 
Levine, Myrna, Woodside, New York (Queens 

College) 
Liebman, Leslie, Melville, New York (State 

University at Albany) 
Mahany, Mary, Camillus, New York (Cornell 

University) 
McElhenny, Margaret, Erie, Pennsylvania 

(Gannon College) 
McLaughlin, Maureen, Memphis, Tennessee 

(St. Mary's College) 
Motschwiller, Debra, Wantagh, New York 

(Hofstra University) 
Pluth, Theresa, Two Harbors, Minnesota 

(University of Minnesota) 
Quartana, Michelle, Brooklyn, New York 

(Brooklyn College) 
Redd, Sharon, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (Cornell 

University) 



Ruggiero, Camellia, Malverne, New York 

(Hofstra University) 
Sanchez, Clyde, Belen, New Mexico (Cornell 

University) 
Sanchez, Dorothy, Albuquerque, New Mexico 

(Cornell University) 
Schmidt, Mary, Richmond Hill, New York 

(Queens College) 
Sohmer, Maryellen, New York, New York 

(Loyola University) 
Sterk, Linda, Grand Rapids, Michigan (Calvin 

College) 
Thomas, Claville, Berbice, Guyana (The Western 

College) 
Windemuth, Donna, Cumberland, Maryland 

(Western Maryland College) 
Zappoio, Catherine, Carmel, New York (Cornell 

University) 

Program for College Graduates 

Adams, Melissa, Highland Park, New Jersey 

(University of Pittsburgh) 
Altman, Patricia, New York, New York (Cornell 

University) 
Anagnos, Alexander, Boston, Massachusetts 

(University of Massachusetts) 
Andersen, Gretchen, West Suffield, Connecticut 

(University of Rochester) 
Arrington, Maria, Lansdale, Pennsylvania 

(Ursinus College) 
Berger, Robyn, Valley Stream, New York (Cornell 

University) 
Breuer, Wendy, Roslyn, New York (Oberlin 

College) 
Butler, Christine, Harmony, Rhode Island 

(Springfield College) 
Cameron, Beth, Lake Park, Florida (Cornell 

University) 
Caponegro, Mary, Brooklyn, New York (College 

of Mount Saint Vincent) 
Clark, Alison, Scarsdale, New York (Trinity 

College) 
Copley, Ann, Stoughton, Massachusetts (Colby 

College) 
Cummings, Elizabeth, New York, New York 

(Mt. Holyoke College) 
Dlugose, Deborah, Albany, New York (Syracuse 

University) 
Downey, Sister Roberta, Stamford, Connecticut 

(Villanova University) 
Falters, Beth, Chicago, Illinois (Lawrence 

University) 
Feibusch, Betty, Brooklyn, New York (Brooklyn 

College) 
Gantman, Elisabeth, Winthrop, Massachusetts 

(University of Massachusetts) 
Germano, Elaine, Easton, Pennsylvania 

(University of Rochester) 
Goldberg, Ina, New York, New York (New York 

University) 
Grove, Nancy, Sarasota, Florida (Brown 

University) 



Register 33 



Grun, Olga, White Plains, New York (New York 

University) 
Haber, Andrea, Westbury, New York (State 

University at New Paltz) 
Hansen, Susan, New York, New York (Brown 

University) 
Herndon, Carolyn, Avondale, Pennsylvania 

(University of Michigan) 
Jameson, Deborah, Northampton, Massachusetts 

(University of Pennsylvania) 
Kortrey, Wendy, Staten Island, New York 

(Wagner College) 
Kramer, Marcia, Woodside, New York (Cornell 

University) 
Landesberg, JoAnn, Silver Spring, Maryland 

(Washington University) 
Lester, Lucy, Hamburg, New York (University of 

Washington) 
Lewis, Jane, Bayside, New York (State 

University at Albany) 
Long, Margaret, Orinda, California (Stanford 

University) 
Lovell, Richard, New York, New York (St. Peter's 

College) 
Lowe, Joseph, Elmira, New York (Columbia 

College) 
Mangini, Edward, Whitestone, New York (lona 

College) 
Marcil, Patricia, Adams, Massachusetts 

(Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute) 
McMechan, Mary, New York, New York (City 

College) 
Ourach, Linda, Kew Gardens, New York (Knox 

College) 
Rodde, Helen, New York, New York (Stanford 

University) 
Rossi, Laura, Bronx, New York (Marymount 

Manhattan College) 
Schulman, Janet, Bronx, New York (Queens 

College) 



Shmagm, Barbara, Forest Hills, New York 

(Barnard College) 
Smith, Randy, Dumont, New Jersey (Douglass 

College) 
Spodek, Susan, East Rockaway, New York 

(University of California at Berkeley) 
Summers, Donna, Astoria, New York (Hunter 

College) 
Taylor, Betty, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (Douglass 

College) 
Treiber, Adele, Garden City, New York (Ohio 

Wesleyan University) 
Wormser, Ann, New Rochelle, New York 

(Oberlin College) 
Young, Cynthia, Tuckahoe, New York (Bucknell 

University) 
Young, Mary, Fayatteville, North Carolina 

(Cornell University) 

Registered Nurse Students 

Armstrong, Kerry, Staten Island, New York 

(Montclair State College) 
Fidgeon, Patricia, New York, New York 

(Marymount Manhattan College) 
Krebs, Alecia Miloski, New York, New York 

(Hunter College) 
Lang, Cheryl, Bronx, New York (Lehman College) 
Logan, Mary, New York, New York (Hunter 

College) 
Luczun, Mary Ellen, New York, New York 

(Hunter College) 
Niessner, Patricia, New York, New York (Hunter 

College) 
Owczarczak, Joyce, New York, New York (Hunter 

College) 
Rivera, Romen, New York, New York (Hunter 

College) 
Wheeler, Kathleen, New York, New York 

(Metropolitan Junior College) 



Cornell University 



Index 



fee, 17 



Academic Calendar, 2 

Academic standing, 16 

Acceptance, dates of, 14-15; 

Accreditation, 8 

Administration, University, 29; School, 30 

Admission, 12-15; general requirements, 12-13; 

College Graduate Program, 14; Registered 

Nurse Program, 14 
Applications, 14; dates for filing, 14; fee, 17; 

requests for, 36 
Assessment of Health Status of Children or 

Adults, 26 
Auditing of Courses, 16; fee, 17 
Baccalaureate Degree Program for Registered 

Nurses, 11, 14 
Bills, payment of, 17-18 
Biological science courses, 26-27 
Calendar, 2-3 

Care of the Adult Patient, 25 
Class of 1976, 31-33 
Clinical facilities, 23 
Clinical Nursing — Acute Care of Children or 

Adults, 26 
Clinical Nursing — Long-Term Care or Chronic 

Illness of Children or Adults, 26 
Clinical Nursing — Primary Care of Children 

or Adults, 26 
College Graduate Program, 10, 14 
College Scholarship Service, 18 
Community Health, 25 
Continuing Education, Division of, 23 
Cornell Medical Center, 29; Joint Board, 29 
Cornell University administration, 29 
Counseling services, 22-23 
Courses, plan for Program I, 12; plan for College 

Graduates, 12; plan for Registered Nurses, 12 
Dean's List, 16 

Degree, requirements, 16; with distinction, 16 
Department of Health, 23 
Dimensions of Nursing, 26 
Dismissal, 16 

Division of Continuing Education, 23 
Epidemiology, 27 
Exemption of courses, examination, 15-16; 

fee, 17 
Expenses, 17 
Facilities, clinical, 23; for instruction, 23; 

housing, 22; recreational, 22 
Faculty, administration, 30; continuing educa- 
tion, 31; emeritus, 31; undergraduate, 30 



Fees, 17 

Financial assistance, 18-20; application for, 1) 
dates for, 15, 18; administering, 20 

Foundations of nursing, 25 

Full-time study, 17 

Grades, 15 

Grants, 18, 20 

Guided study, 21 

Health services, 22 

History of School, 7 

Honor society, 16 

Housing, costs, 17; information, 22; regula- 
tions, 22 

Independent Study, 27 

Information, request for, 35; visit for, 15 

Interpersonal Processes in Nursing, 25 

Introduction to Nursing, 25 

Introduction to Research, 27 

Instruction facilities, 23 

Instructors, 30 

Jacob S. Lasdon House, 22 

Joint Administration Board, 29 

Late registration fee, 17 

Library, 23 

Life-span Growth and Development, 27 

Living out, 22 

Loans, 18, 20 

Maternal-Child Nursing, 25 

New York Hospital, 7; administration, 29; 
facilities for instruction, 23 

Nursing courses, 25-26 

Nursing in the Social Order, 27 

Nursing major, 10-12 

Objectives, 8-10 

Organization, student, 20, 22 

Part-time study, 17 

Pharmacology, 27 

Philosophy, 8 

Professors, emeritus, 31 

Program I, 12 

Program for College Graduates, 12 

Program for Registered Nurses, 12 

Public Health, course, 27 

Recreational facilities, 22 

Refunds, 18 

Register, 29-33 

Registered Nurse Program, 12 

Registration, late fee, 17; state, 17 

Reinstatement fee, 17 

Requirements, general, 12-14; degree, 16 



Index 35 



Research, Introduction to, 27 

Scholar Incentive Program, 20 

Scholarships, 20 

Sigma Theta Tau, 16 

Social Order, Nursing in the, 27 

Social science courses, 27 

Spanish for Health Professionals, 27 

State registration for graduates, 17 

Students, 31-33 

Transfer fee, 17 

Transition to Nursing Practice, 25 

Tuition, 17 

Undergraduate program, 8-1 1 

Visiting nurse, 23 

Visits to the School, 15 

Withdrawal, 16; refund for, 18 



Request Form 

□ I wish to apply for admission in September, 



(year) 

Please send me an application blank for 

□ College Graduate Program 

□ Registered Nurse Program 



street address 



Further Information and Application 
Undergraduate Program 

It is important that persons interested in 
pursuing one of the programs at the School of 
Nursing make plans well in advance so that 
their college programs may be arranged to 
provide the necessary background. 

To receive assistance in such planning, or an 
application, an interested student should fill out 
the form on this page and send it to 

Admissions 

Cornell University-New York Hospital School of 

Nursing 
515 East 71 Street 
New York, New York 10021. 

(The writer should include a zip code.) 



city 



state zip 



date of birth 



name of high school 



address 



date high school diploma received 



name of college 



address 



dates of college attendance 



List of Announcements 

Following is a list of Announcements 
published by Cornell University to provide 
information on programs, faculty, facilities, 
curricula, and courses of the various 
academic units. 

Agriculture and Life Sciences at Cornell 
New York State College of Agriculture and 

Life Sciences: Courses 
College of Architecture, Art, and Planning 
College of Arts and Sciences: Courses of Study 
College of Arts and Sciences: Introduction 
Department of Asian Studies 
Graduate School of Business and Public 

Administration 
College of Engineering 
Engineering at Cornell 
Graduate Study in Engineering and Applied 

Sciences 
General Information* 
Graduate School 

Graduate School: Course Descriptions 
School of Hotel Administration 
New York State College of Human Ecology 
New York State School of Industrial and Labor 

Relations 
Law School 

Medical College (New York City) 
Graduate School of Medical Sciences 

(New York City) 
Cornell University-New York Hospital 

School of Nursing (New York City) 
Officer Education (ROTC) 
Summer Session 
New York State Veterinary College 

* The Announcement of General Information 
is designed to give prospective students 
pertinent information about all aspects and 
academic units of the University. 

Requests for the publications listed above 
should be addressed to 

Cornell University Announcements 
Edmund Ezra Day Hall 
Ithaca, New York 14853. 



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I WOULD 
FOUND AN 
INSTITUTIO 
WHERE